What do you think Decepticon means?

Discussion in 'Transformers Movie Discussion' started by RedWolf, Feb 22, 2008.

  1. Trip2boy

    Trip2boy Well-Known Member

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    Barricade death Transformers Decepticons.jpeg
     
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  2. ChaosDonkey

    ChaosDonkey Lord Brain

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    Robotnik, rabotnik is a slavic word not a greek. And it's laborer/worker. Not slave
     
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  3. SMOG

    SMOG Vocab-champion ArgueTitan

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    Yes... 11 years ago... I thought the root was Greek. :lol 

    But I did know it was a Czech who originated the modern term - I had misunderstood that Capek borrowed the word from Greek.

    Based on the sources I've come across, the original word refers specifically to "forced labour" and the tradition of serfdom, not simply "work" in the generic sense. Serfs were not free, tacitly belonged to land-owners (technically tied to the land itself), and were subject to forced labour. I think "slave" remains a fair approximation.

    zmog
     
  4. Cyberbot8460

    Cyberbot8460 Average Geewunner.

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    In the IDW comics, they’re called Decepticons after their motto, “You are being deceived.”
     
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  5. ChaosDonkey

    ChaosDonkey Lord Brain

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    It derives from ancient slavic(church Slavonic today). And it's still an ongoing discussion what came from what. Rabotnik/robotnik(worker) from rab/rob(slave) or the other way around.
    Interesting enslave is said zarobit za = for.
    Or porobit with po meaning at. All depending of the slavic country in question.
    For work :) 
    At work :) 

    It was just čapek who is Czech that coined the word to describe automatons.
     
  6. SMOG

    SMOG Vocab-champion ArgueTitan

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    Exactly. That's the part that every sci-fi nerd knows. :) 

    The deeper slavic etymology is not something I can really say much about.

    zmog