Customs: Need advice 3D modeling faces.

Discussion in 'Creative General Discussion' started by reluttr, Feb 8, 2019.

  1. reluttr

    reluttr Well-Known Member

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    I used to be a pretty heavy user of Tinkercad, but as of late the service has really went to crap.

    So I have been trying to learn Fusion360, which I have had a lot of success using, even though the creative process really clashes with what I am more comfortable with. Fusion basically expects you to have everything blueprinted out in a 2d, then you use tools to pull the model out of that drawing. Where I am more accustomed to tinkercads way of taking a basic shape and subtracting from it to get what I want.

    But something that has really turned into a roadblock for me is trying to model a good looking face. It's actually surprisingly easy to model a face shape with hard lines, like bumblebee's, using two sketches and the loft function. But I'm having trouble making the face looked more polished. Simple things like making a subtle curve to the front of the face or even adding on rounded face plate.

    So I am curious what other people use when modeling their faces?

    I found this program made by the same developers as ZBrush called "Sculptris", but my issue is how do you set parametric constants in a program like that? Because obviously if I am making a replacement face for a figure then certain parts have to conform specifically in order to fit correctly.
     
  2. Snaku

    Snaku Well-Known Member

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    Sorry you haven't gotten a response yet. I don't know any of those programs or what a parametric constant is so I can't really offer much help with that. I thought fusion 360 had three different modeling methods - the more drafting style one you talked about, a more sculpting oriented one, and a third with like vector curves or something.

    Personally, I use blender because it was the first thing I tried, I got pretty ok at it, and now I'm too lazy to try to relearn what limited skills I have in a new program.
     
  3. Rodentus prime

    Rodentus prime Old Git

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    In fusion - Create >Create Form is what you're looking for, then you make a shape and manipulate the vertices. Look for tutorials on youtube.
     
  4. Ruizu1990

    Ruizu1990 dark energon is one hell of a drug

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    I think it's probably best to persevere with Fusion 360. I believe Hasbro uses a similar software to design their toys (probably Autocad or the like). I started off with Blender but often times it's a nightmare getting the final sculpt to be 3D printable. It CAN be done, but it's a pain in the butt. Fusion 360 generates nice clean geometry than rarely needs any repair work done to it (none of mine have needed any so far).