Haslab Unicron

Discussion in 'Transformers News and Rumors' started by bearytrek, Jul 15, 2019.

  1. BB Shockwave

    BB Shockwave Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2003
    Posts:
    6,407
    News Credits:
    34
    Trophy Points:
    337
    Likes:
    +3,304
    Ebay:
    You fail to understand how stores work... Ollies ALREADY bought those toys from retailers at likely 140$ or so, and those retailers bought it from Hasbro at some lower cost. They now OWN the toys. Whether they can sell them at 150 or 40, Hasbro did not lose anything in this transaction. What, you thought Hasbro is only getting paid once the actual toy is sold? If econimy worked like that they would have gone bankrupt ages ago. If retailers could return unsold product, I couldn't have found a toy storehouse in Wien still full of unsold Transmetal 2 Optimus Minors and Armada Laserbeaks. ;) 
     
    • Like Like x 3
  2. Crim

    Crim Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2013
    Posts:
    3,630
    Trophy Points:
    222
    Likes:
    +3,493
    Ollies probably got them way less then that and probably from stores that did pay that much for them.
     
    • Like Like x 3
  3. GoLion

    GoLion Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2014
    Posts:
    8,430
    News Credits:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    242
    Likes:
    +4,618
    Ollie's probably paid a small marginal fee for the figures. So not what we would have paid at retail, but a bit above what the retailer paid to purchase the item from the manufacturer.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  4. Hoffman

    Hoffman Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2014
    Posts:
    3,583
    News Credits:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    222
    Likes:
    +2,790
    No, Ollie's would have paid less than what they were selling them for. The original retailer would have taken a huge loss dumping them off on Ollie's.

    Stores don't liquidate their stock if they stand to make a profit. They dump it off however they can, because it's better to have that cash flow in than sit of thousands of dollars of dead stock.

    If Ollie's paid more than what they sold them for, they wouldn't exist.
     
    • Like Like x 6
  5. GoLion

    GoLion Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2014
    Posts:
    8,430
    News Credits:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    242
    Likes:
    +4,618
    I'm not sure. We are missing a few parts of the puzzle. What did regular retail pay to purchase them in bulk? What retail pays for the figure and what they sell it for are a different price. I imagine that Ollies paid a bit above the price that retail paid to purchase the figure from the supplier/manufacturer. Ollies then turned around and sold said items just above what they paid for them. Still making a profit. Again, I could be wrong.

    I do not think Ollies bought the figures at the price they were being asked at retail. That doesn't mean they didn't pay a small marginal price above what retail paid to get them in store.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  6. mikequillm

    mikequillm Wrecker

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2013
    Posts:
    4,054
    News Credits:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    222
    Likes:
    +2,444
    They advertised them at thirteen dollars at my store from the get-go
     
    • Like Like x 1
  7. Mattymo

    Mattymo Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2017
    Posts:
    1,307
    News Credits:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    197
    Likes:
    +2,663
    It depends. They probably paid more than they sold and then got allowance or what we vendors call a SCAN. A SCAN is when something comes in at a price and is sold very cheap and for every item that is sold the store gets a SCAN from the company of the product to make money off of.

    Example is, say fort max was brought in at a price of $100 and the store sells him for $75. For every fort max that is sold hasbro gives them $50. That means that store made $25 behind the scenes.

    Example in my own business. I sell something in for $10 and I have the store sell it for $9. For every one they sell I give them a scan for $3. Now it cost $10 to produce. My customer is actually making money but I’m making a loss but I’m making money on a higher priced other I have that I also sell the store.

    That’s how retail works. One item being a flop doesn’t mean a loss when you sell hundreds of items

    I’m not saying that’s how Ollie’s works but that’s actually how a lot of stuff is sold so cheap.
     
    Last edited: Aug 22, 2019
    • Like Like x 3
  8. Crim

    Crim Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2013
    Posts:
    3,630
    Trophy Points:
    222
    Likes:
    +3,493
    Dude, no business is gonna buy these at $50 and then turn around and sell them for $40. No business is gonna take a lost like that. What happened is that Ollies bought a ton of these from some sort of liquidator who bought them from stores all at a VERY reduced cost. If a $150 product isn't selling and is taking up space it's better to sell it for as low as they can, write it off and get their shelf space back.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  9. Mattymo

    Mattymo Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2017
    Posts:
    1,307
    News Credits:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    197
    Likes:
    +2,663
    Yes they do. They do it all the time. I’m a vendor. It happens all the time. One item being sold dirt cheap can be a loss but it means getting rid of unwanted inventory.
     
    • Like Like x 3
  10. Hoffman

    Hoffman Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2014
    Posts:
    3,583
    News Credits:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    222
    Likes:
    +2,790
    As a vendor, you sell below cost when you have to. Which is what the original retailers do.

    A liquidation store has absolutely no incentive to do that, as they can just as easily not buy that product. They don't need to have specific things in stock.

    As a retailer myself, I'd love to hear specific examples of when you would intentionally purchase a product and then immediately sell it below your cost.

    (loss leaders aside, which really only applies to the largest of retailers where rules don't really apply)

    Cost on toys is nowhere near that low. They could not sell them at $40 and make a profit over original wholesale. It would be a significant loss.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 22, 2019
    • Like Like x 3
  11. TAAO

    TAAO Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2018
    Posts:
    172
    Trophy Points:
    87
    Location:
    Fredonia, NY
    Likes:
    +354
    Ebay:
    I think you failed to read my post in it's entirety. My post was referring to the fact that Titans at reduced prices does not necessarily mean a "financial failure" on the part of Hasbro. Maybe you could kindly read the actual lines instead of reading between them. Thanks
     
    • Like Like x 1
  12. Mattymo

    Mattymo Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2017
    Posts:
    1,307
    News Credits:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    197
    Likes:
    +2,663
    In an example of fort max and trypticon no doubt hasbro sold them under cost of production but it doesn't matter when you’re a multi billion dollar company and it’s one or 2 items compared to hundreds to thousands SKUs that you make.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  13. Jmaster99

    Jmaster99 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2017
    Posts:
    120
    Trophy Points:
    77
    Likes:
    +167
    I am so preordering this with BBTS at the end of the month. I deserve nice things and I just get the biggest feeling they will do anything for the fans that are willing to pay so much for this, some how, and if not, I at least get my money back
     
    • Like Like x 7
  14. Hoffman

    Hoffman Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2014
    Posts:
    3,583
    News Credits:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    222
    Likes:
    +2,790
    Fair enough, but again a manufacturer selling at a loss is very different than a retailer buying wholesale and then selling for cheaper. Again, with some exceptions for the largest of the large.

    I sincerely doubt that liquidation stores ever intentionally follow this model though, as their entire business model is to sell whatever they can acquire for cheap and turn for a profit.
     
    • Like Like x 3
  15. prfctcellrulz

    prfctcellrulz #BringBackNationalDex

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2009
    Posts:
    9,286
    News Credits:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    287
    Location:
    Union Beach, New Jersey (Still for now)
    Likes:
    +4,418
    Facebook:
    Twitter:
    Instagram:
    YouTube:
    Tumblr:
    New video detailing the removable head/faceplate



    Mod edit: Screencaps added
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 22, 2019
    • Like Like x 13
    • News Credit News Credit x 1
  16. Mattymo

    Mattymo Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2017
    Posts:
    1,307
    News Credits:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    197
    Likes:
    +2,663
    I love that feature. It’s a great touch
     
    • Like Like x 6
  17. GoLion

    GoLion Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2014
    Posts:
    8,430
    News Credits:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    242
    Likes:
    +4,618
    As I wrote in my post, I'm not sure about the actual details. I'm just supposing based on my limited knowledge of how sales work in the retail landscape. You could very well be right.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  18. Mattymo

    Mattymo Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2017
    Posts:
    1,307
    News Credits:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    197
    Likes:
    +2,663
    Companies success is based on several thing. Most companies targets are three things: volume, margin, and revenue.

    Volume is how many items you sell. Margin is the percentage you want to make off items and revenue is well...revenue. It’s how much you make as a whole. My company for years cares about volume. How much you’re moving. Now for the past couple years we’ve moved to revenue. Volume goes down but prices go up and the goal is make a bigger revenue. One item not making money means nothing when you’re revenue is good. Considering hasbro releases their revenue reports I’m gonna wager that’s their focus. Their over all profits.
     
    • Like Like x 4
  19. CannibalChow

    CannibalChow Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2019
    Posts:
    354
    News Credits:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    112
    Location:
    Orlando, Florida
    Likes:
    +793
    Starting to realize that head is like baseball sized. ._.
     
    • Like Like x 3
  20. Hicks_Royel

    Hicks_Royel Nifty

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2007
    Posts:
    10,223
    News Credits:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    312
    Likes:
    +6,286
    Agreed, but let's use simplified, entirely fictional numbers to better explain.

    TRU retail price, $140.
    TRU purchase from Hasbro price, $30.
    Ollie's retail price, $50.
    Ollie's purchase price from TRU liquidation, anywhere between $25 to $35 depending on whether TRU was in a position where they were desperate enough to some recover money by either taking a marginal loss or make a marginal profit.

    But, yes, Ollie's doesn't sell products at financial loss to them.
     
    • Like Like x 4