going to see v for vendetta tonight...for free

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Lumpy, Mar 13, 2006.

  1. TrickyDisco

    TrickyDisco <b><font color=blue>Voted TFW2005's Sexiest Female

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    Yeah, got to see it last night (and they had the Superman trailer in the previews hee hee :D  )
    I was pleasantly surprised, they did a good job with it. I know for sure I'll never listen to the 1812 overture the same way again and of course the whole audience howled with laughter during the 'Benny Hill' bit :lol  Stephen Fry is a total marvel.

    I'll definitely go and see it again when it officially opens here. :) 
     
  2. Jetfireinthesky

    Jetfireinthesky Well-Known Member

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    I just saw it. Awesome movie. I hwven't read the comic but I know Moore's is usually dark. So at the end I was sitting absorbing the ending. But it was a reeeeeaaalllly good movie. And I got to see the Superman Returns and X-Men: The Last Stand trailers back to back.
     
  3. ChldsPlay

    ChldsPlay Well-Known Member

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    We had the x-men and superman teasers. No trailers. Was pretty sad seeing old previews on a new release when there are new trailers out.
     
  4. Lord Of Tetris

    Lord Of Tetris Well-Known Member

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    I saw it tonight and thought it was fantastic. GREAT adaptation of a comic book, and I actually liked how it changed from the book. It meant I had a few surprises left in store for me when I saw the movie.

    The final fight scene is probably the COOLEST fight scene I've seen in a movie since Matrix 3. WOW.

    Honestly, just about my only complaint with the movie is that I wished the end credits was NOT rock-n-roll. I would've gone with Mozart or something like that if I was the director.
     
  5. Razerwire

    Razerwire 99 Problems... Veteran

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    I heard Alan Moore wanted nothing to do with the movie since the Wachowski brothers changed some of it... Is this true???
     
  6. Wing alpha

    Wing alpha <b><font color=blue>I voted for Super_Megatron and

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    yeah its true read it yesterday in the Dose(Canadian newspaper)

    in other news holy crap this movie ROCKED as in it made you think. Im a fan of big explosions, and well the matrix moves at the end didnt reallly bother me as Im somewhat of fan. overall Im impressed. the second half could have gone better but hey nobody is perfect.
     
  7. Lord Of Tetris

    Lord Of Tetris Well-Known Member

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    The thing with Alan Moore is, he's a GREAT author. I don't think anybody can contest this. However, he might be batshit insane. He hates EVERY movie based on his work. He hates it before he sees it. He hates it before he reads the script. He doesn't offer to help. He just hates it, steps away, and says horrible things. Since he disowns it and refuses to give his input, OF COURSE he hates it, and OF COURSE it sucks because he won't talk to the writers/director.

    With a more sensible author (let's just use, for example, Bob Kane for Batman 1). Bob Kane didn't write Batman 1 (the movie), but he was on set for all 4 Batman movies. Kane submitted some redesigns for the Batmobile and the bat-costume (none were used, however), and he even did a piece of artwork that made it into the final movie of Batman 1. His influence was minimal, but he supported the movie, liked it, and when Tim Burton asked Bob Kane a question, Bob was on set and very happy to answer it.

    Let's say Bob Kane were alive, and he tells us he really hates the movie adaptation of some of his works. This would be acceptable.

    But with Alan Moore, he's really become the boy who cries wolf. Don't listen to him when he says his movies suck. He's usually right, of course, but don't listen to him. He'll hate it regardless of how good/bad it is.
     
  8. RabidYak

    RabidYak Go Ninja Go Ninja Go

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    I wouldent go as far as saying that Moore was batshit, but he's certainly an eccentric who takes business far too personally.
     
  9. JoshBot

    JoshBot Well-Known Member

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    The main reason Alan Moore had such a problem with the movie was because Joel Silver outright lied about his involvement with it. He didn't really care too much one way or another, but then Joel Silver said he'd read the script and loved it and had been interacting with the Wachowskis about it. Well, he hadn't, and was understandably pissed that Joel Silver had said that he had. That was what prompted the incredibly vitriolic rants of his that popped up online. Yes, Alan Moore is a grumpy-ass pessimist, but in this case he had the right to be.
     
  10. The_Bardock

    The_Bardock ****** of the Minicons

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    Just got back from seeing it (the staff viewing didn't happen so I had to wait until now) and man was it awesome.
     
  11. Ops_was_a_truck

    Ops_was_a_truck JOOOLIE ANDREWWWWWS!!!!!!

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    My girlfriend and I saw this tonight. It's an amazing film and I wonder if it will garner any awards when the Academy Awards 2006 roll around.

    One thing that I really enjoyed about the film was its commentary on cultural inevitability - society's mutual agreement on the vilification or vindication of someone can be easily molded by the media and government. When one individual has the moral courage to stand up and say something in defense, they have to make a pretty damn effective show of it or their point will be washed away.

    I deleted this next sentence about 5 times because I kept rethinking what I was going to say next. Although I wanted to say "I wish someone would do that with America," I realized that someone had, but by running a plane into a building. Whether or not we vilified those invidiuals, their point was transmitted - they stand for a fundamental religion and have a polar opposition to our way of life.

    The question of how to make "a damn effective show of it" when making your political point is, at this point, very muddy. Terrorism has now, realistically, worked in America to make a point about a single religious stance and the ripples of that terrorist event were and are shaped and molded by the media like water through pipes. There was one image, though, that wasn't filtered and hit nearly everyone - a plane hitting a building, causing deaths. To be absolutely blunt, that's effective transmission of a point.

    Vendetta's antihero transmitted a very effective message to his oppressed countrymen about the freedoms they lost and the government that had taken them, all in the name of peace and harmony. How do you make a point bolstering the principles Americans hold proud - those outlined in the Constitution and the Bill of Rights, like peace and harmony - without filtering it through the media anymore? Without spin or watering-down? Or, to put the point simply, how do you effectively transmit a message now?

    If this is far too political and has to go, edit as necessary, mods.
     
  12. Razerwire

    Razerwire 99 Problems... Veteran

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    Dammit Ops, I didn't want to THINK this weekend and you just made me do it...:lol 
     
  13. Pravus Prime

    Pravus Prime Wields Mjolnir!

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    I say this with full candor, without exageration or agrandizement; without the novelty of newness. As a cold detached film major, as a film lover, and someone who hopes to be a scriptwriter, I say this; it's one of the best films I've ever seen.

    I was amazed. I went in expecting a good movie. I got a fantastic one instead. Make fun if you want, but this is a very strong movie on every level.
     
  14. KA

    KA Well-Known Member

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    hes got his own agenda, basically. DC as licensor has for the most part screwed him and collaborators out of fair share and credit, so much so the he has, on occasion, compensated fellow collaborators out of his own pocket.

    (note that david lloyd has a share in the creation of v vs vendetta. comics as a medium is a strong combination of visual and the written language)

    which is why purist hold him in high regard. in this day and age where ppl are looking to cash in at the first chance, he actually has integrity. this is even more admirable when his own stature as a writer is unquestionable.

    i am pleasantly surprised to hear nothing but good comments from friends whove seen it. looking fwd to it.
     
  15. Vangelus

    Vangelus Long Live the New Flesh Moderator Content Contributor

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    Finally (yes, one day after release is "finally" when it comes to me and V) saw it.

    Damn.

    Yes, things are different (in some cases, VERY different) from the book. However, I believe the movie still was incredible. Its changes weren't overly distracting to me, and I've read the book just the other week.

    One thing I -was- worried about was the message being lost, and I'm happy to say that I think it was still there, albeit dumbed down for film audience.

    My biggest, most justified gripe would probably be that the movie was too black + white. The villains, you hated. V, you loved (more or less). The book was more effective at being subtle and leaving things grey, IMO.

    However, I certainly would not say the movie was bad. I think it really was a triumph, especially in the sense of taking V's story and reworking it into something palatable by the general audience of today. And most of all, it remained more or less timeless, in that its story won't lose value in a few years from now.

    Also, keeping the torture/Vanessa scene practically word-for-word REALLY helped up my opinion of the movie.

    Anyway, GO SEE IT NOW.

    *listens to his MP3 of Vicious Cabaret*
     
  16. KA

    KA Well-Known Member

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    vicious cabaret FTW!
     
  17. KA

    KA Well-Known Member

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    good call on the parallels with 9-11. the comic was written in the 80s and borrows freely from orwell's 1984, so it was written very much in regards to the cold war and tatcherism in mind. remarkable how the warchowski bros. have effectively made it contemporary and valid to our current political climate.

    just got back from watching it and must say it was a-MAY-zing how similar yet different it is from the book. so much so that i was almost sad that only david lloyd's name was attached to the film as per the credits.

    i held my breath as evey's catharsis unfolded and was in awe as the movie unravelled to its inevitable conclusion (despite major changes in story elements).

    again, credit really must go the bros. for effectively translating this movie onto the big screen. despite the brevity theyve managed to convey the essence of the original while adding elements that enhanced it.
     
  18. wheeljack01

    wheeljack01 Happiness is a warm gun

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    Going to see it today. I can't wait!
     
  19. Lord Of Tetris

    Lord Of Tetris Well-Known Member

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    I have a quick thing to say about accuracy to the comic book: it is, more or less, as comic-accurate to the comic book as Batman Begins was. Accurate enough so that the "soul" is adequately onscreen, but with some specifics changed.
     
  20. The Spider

    The Spider Well-Known Member

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    First off your Bob Kane analogy doesn't work. Bob Kane didn't write many of the early Batman comics either. Bill Finger was the one who designed the actual Bat-suit and wrote the first story, among other things.... At http://www.tcj.com/271/i_robinson.html Jerry Robinson (who worked with Kane and Finger, and was also co-creator of Robin and Joker) recounts what Bob Kane and Bill Finger ACTUALLY worked on.

    This instance, along with the other story about what happened to Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster from the 50's to the 70's, is why Moore would be justified in being overprotective of his work.

    As for Moore--he didn't have quite major problems with the film adaptations until someone sued 20th Century Fox claiming that they hired Moore to write a comic that would rip off a film idea sold to Fox. THAT is the major source of Moore's anger with Hollywood. See http://www.comicbookresources.com/columns/index.cgi?column=litg&article=2153

    From there, Moore requested that he really, really not be associated with film adaptations, and that his name be taken off the credits. Then some time ago Joel Silver claimed that Moore was supporting the V FOR VENDETTA movie, and that led to Moore making the demand that his name be taken off DC books.

    Now, is Moore overreacting? Sure, and he's overreacted before (try to do a search for what happened between him and Steve Bissette, and the debacle over Captain Britain & Marvelman with Alan Davis). But still, I wouldn't say this is a "Boy Who Cried Wolf" case. Moore didn't really scream out "BAD MOVIE, LOOK OUT BAD MOVIE RUN AWAY" constantly when FROM HELL and LXG came out. If you look at these complaints, the major problems came about when people tried to associate him WITH the movie.