Fixing too tight pegs: Sanding down the pegs vs sanding down the holes

Discussion in 'Transformers Toy Discussion' started by Nevermore, May 16, 2020.

  1. Nevermore

    Nevermore It's self-perpetuating a parahumanoidarianised!

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    So there's this issue with Earthrise Grapple, where the pegs on his crane arm/head assembly that slot into his feet in vehicle mode are such a tight fit that they easily break. Happened on my first specimen too, and the second one is an even tighter fit.

    Some people recommend sanding down the pegs, which seems rather complicated (and risky, considering those pegs' design) compared to my solution: Sanding down the pegholes.

    For that, all you need are a matching 5mm metal pin that's a tight fit, and a pair of pliers. My pin came from a piece of furniture.
    Peghole.jpg

    Simply slot in the pin, then use the pliers to turn it around until it becomes loose enough to turn the pin with your fingers. Now the pegs go in and out just fine.

    Another advantage: Pegholes that are sanded down are less obvious unless you actually look inside compared to sanded down pegs.


    What do you guys think? Do you prefer sanding down pegs or pegholes?
     
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  2. Dachande

    Dachande Very Hank. Moderator TFW2005 Supporter

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    Pegs, personally. All you need to do is wrap a piece of sandpaper around it and twist a few times.
     
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  3. DecepticusPrime

    DecepticusPrime "Essential" Personnel

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    Depends. In the case of grapple, those holes are part of his combat system and wouldn't want to risk the ability to weaponize him.
     
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  4. Driskull98

    Driskull98 Icon by @DTDraws on Twitter

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    It's easier to fix the pegs if you mess up compared to fixing the holes.
     
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  5. Shin Densetsu

    Shin Densetsu I WILL DESTROY YOU Super Mod

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    @ziltama shaved down the 5mm ports too
     
  6. EarthGBilly

    EarthGBilly Sucker for a GERWALK Mode

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    I... I usually check to see which is off with existing weapons that are supposed to fit into the holes. If I have a weapon which is proven true, it tells me which part needs adjustment.
     
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  7. atomD21

    atomD21 Not made of sterner stuff...

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    I've done both before, but prefer to sand or shave the pegs.
     
  8. Aimless Misfire

    Aimless Misfire Banned

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    This is what I do. Done in a few seconds & pegs fit perfectly. There is no reason to do it any other way unless you like wasting time & extra work.
     
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  9. ziltama

    ziltama Mods, molds, and casts. Also full of hot gas.

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    I posted about Grapple's peg and port problem earlier and mirrored it to my bloated mod thread:
    Heavy/Scratch: - Various mods (of mods), custom stuff

    The problem with Grapple is that his feet ports are warped causing them to be narrow. The pegs are properly sized. The appropriate solution is to fix the ports, not the pegs. Otherwise, any other peg plugged into his feet (feet armor, jet blasts, etc...) will have the same problem.

    The best and safest way is to hold a 5mm drill bit by hand (must be metric) and then twist until there is no more resistance to make a proper 5mm port.

    The problem with your solution is that you're trying to fix a warp with a warp. The plastic will likely go back to the way it was (unless it cracks or unless you heat treat, which I don't recommend at all) and then you're back to square one.
     
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  10. Shin Densetsu

    Shin Densetsu I WILL DESTROY YOU Super Mod

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    I might end up trying this on SIEGE Apeface for the stabilizer section that plugs in for jet mode.
     
  11. fschuler

    fschuler Post Count Inflated With Hot Air TFW2005 Supporter

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    ^This is the safest bet.
     
  12. Mister D

    Mister D Bloosh Compatible TFW2005 Supporter

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    I used a flat head screwdriver. 3mm I think. Scraped the inside of each side of the hole. Took 3-5 scrapes each. Worked fine.
     
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  13. Sponge

    Sponge Herald of Unicron

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    I usually go with pegs, however it depends, there are cases where sanding the peg of a tight weapon makes it unusable with other peg holes, so it’s kinda case by case, tho I much prefer sanding the pegs when it’s an option since it’s faster and more consistent for me to do
     
  14. PlanckEpoch

    PlanckEpoch Red and black red and black

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    Maybe bias, maybe plastic models experience. But it's usually always better to work on the pegs than it is the holes. Easier to control the pegs, like using a small file or sandpaper. Messing up the holes come with all kinds of issues.
     
  15. WereDragon EX

    WereDragon EX Well-Known Member

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    How do you fix them? I do so by applying a thin layer of super glue to thicken the peg slightly.
     
  16. SPLIT LIP

    SPLIT LIP Be strong enough to be gentle

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    That's actually a pretty cool way of fixing "slight intolerances." I do normally sand down the peg as it's easier to fix than a hole, but if I know it's the hole that's too tight and and the peg is a weapon handle, I'll usually get some sort of close-enough dremel tip or even drill bit and lightly, gently shave away until it's a snug but manageable fit.
     
  17. Driskull98

    Driskull98 Icon by @DTDraws on Twitter

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    I don't use super glue because it's fragile. I have a bottle of Pledge Floor Care Finish that I use instead. It's similar to the old Pledge Future floor polish you see a lot of older posts talk about that's no longer in production in the U.S. I just take a q-tip, dip it into a small amount of the finish, and lather it onto both the joint/peg and the hole. I also plug the joint in and move it around a bit to really get the polish in there. Some times a single coat is all it takes, other times multiple coats are needed and sometimes it doesn't work at all. I tend to use this mostly on ball joints with some success on other friction joints. Never used it on pinned joints, though.
     
  18. imfallenangel

    imfallenangel Well-Known Member

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    1st thing: I always... ALWAYS check against other accessories and other figures to determine which is the problematic. Jumping to an assumption could lead to screwing things up instead of fixing anything.

    2nd... always... ALWAYS aim to correct the hole first if in any doubt. A hole is better to fix for several reasons, mainly that a larger hole can be "re-tightened" using floor polish or clear coat. You have a much better control over the accuracy with the hole using a 5mm drill bit than sanding a peg.

    Sanding a peg will weaken it, and should only be done if it's confirmed that it really is the guilty party, and should be done slowly, with constantly testing the fit, as if you screw up, you can and will weaken the peg and it can snap. You are removing plastic to a part that should always be as strong as possible.

    Using a metal furniture peg is a bad idea as this will place (and use) pressure, which can snap the part. When it's in the middle of a large part, you might not think it will break, but an unlucky weak point in the plastic and it can happen. Small parts would be quite a risk. But the point is, you are forcing pressure to warp the plastic and that's just a bad thing overall.

    Super glue to fix a broken part can work on most plastics, but not always, so it can be a gamble. I also use talcum (the real stuff aka crushed stone and not starch) to re-enforce it (making it into a very strong paste) to fix holes and missing pieces. Proper epoxy is also a much better approach to use for those heavy repairs. Melting the plastic is something that requires practice and a fair amount of skill and can be very tricky and one screw-up and you can destroy the part completely. For any stress bearing part, I will reinforce using metal wire (twisted into "pins" to provide proper grip and solidity) that I will melt into the parts, then use good epoxy that I will sand if required. I have used small screws to the same effect depending on the type of repair needed.

    To tightened, floor polish is a neutral substance (doesn't affect the plastic) that can do miracles for joints that you don't want to take apart as you just need to drop a few drops into the joint, while clear coat (also fairly neutral) is a great approach for the very loose part but needs (usually ) to take the pieces apart.. Both are semi-permanent fixes, which will wear down in time but not much worse than the normal wear and tear that we get with plastic anyways.

    I would never use super glue to "fix" loose joints. It's chemical composition, it's interaction with plastic, etc. is a risk to end up with a seized (permanently glued) part, and also cause wear on the plastic making it worse in the end.

    I've repaired so many things in my life (not just toys), and through trial and error, I've been able to fix most of anything that is fixable, most to the level of "just like new" or stronger than before.

    So anyways.. the fact that people will spend hundred of dollars on toys and so many will hesitate and not go spend under 5$ for a metric 5mm drill bit that will last them forever (used with plastic) and the proper and best approach is beyond me. And yes, I do expect people to argue about it.