Do superhero secret identities still have worth nowadays?

Discussion in 'Comic Books and Graphic Novels' started by QLRformer, Mar 20, 2020.

  1. SouthtownKid

    SouthtownKid Headmaster

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    Yeah, just watching the Michael Jordan documentary on netflix right now, you really get a sense of how emotionally draining it is and much sanity you lose by being in the public eye 24 hours a day. Secret identities might seem like an outdated concept to some, but if it can be pulled off, I think a person would have to try if they wanted to remain grounded at all.
     
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  2. Rewind Eject

    Rewind Eject Headmaster Compatible

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    I like the system in the Arrowverse where their identities are still a secret to the general public but their supporting casts all know sooner rather than later. No more of this "If I tell Lois Lane then my enemies will go after her" nonsense.
     
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  3. Gordon_4

    Gordon_4 The Big Engine

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    I think that's becoming a more popular middle ground these days. And it makes sense to me for them to do that.
     
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  4. Wh33l JcK

    Wh33l JcK Well-Known Member

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    Its not just for the hero, it is for protecting their loved ones... but maybe the modern writer doesn't care because they killed Alfred anyways,,,
     
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  5. Star Saber

    Star Saber Cybertron 5th Commander

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    I feel a lot of modern writers want to try and break the mold, but don't really think about what happens afterwards when they turn it over to the next writer. Editors particularly during the 70s and 80s if I remember correctly were very specific about what a hero could or couldn't do since they needed to preserve the brand moving forward.
     
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  6. SouthtownKid

    SouthtownKid Headmaster

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    And the downside to that is stagnation. The 1970s is one thing, because you were talking about a continuity that was only about a decade old, both at Marvel and DC. But the more decades you tack onto that, the less viable a strategy it is.

    What I always think of is reading about Siegel & Shuster's plans for Superman, if DC hadn't taken the character away from its creators. They had a continuing, evolving story in mind, with Lois figuring out Clark's identity and them eventually getting married, before DC hijacked the whole thing and fired the people who were responsible for DC's million dollar property. And then what we got was the endless Goundhog Day world we all know.