Non-TF: Display shelf

Discussion in 'Radicons Customs' started by the_last_toltek, Feb 18, 2013.

  1. the_last_toltek

    the_last_toltek technobot

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    This is something I thought up while my wife was doing some decorating in the kitchen. So last year i picked up all of the Gundam 00 1-144 HG good guys from season two, and i had a lot of instruction papers, color guides, etc. lying around and I thought there must be something I could use these for.
    So we had a number of shelves and shadow boxes lying around not being used, and just one day it hit me to do what my wife has been doing on a lot of stuff, and that's modge podging.
    Now I realize I may have to give up my man card after doing this, but i think it turned out really good. So I just thought I'd through it out there and see if any of you guys would ever want to do something like this too.
     

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    Last edited: Feb 18, 2013
  2. ichnach

    ichnach Predacon

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    no more Man card? get out in the kitchen and knit me a sammich! Seriously though, this is a pretty cool idea. what kind of adhesive did you use?
     
  3. the_last_toltek

    the_last_toltek technobot

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    it's the modge podge. Seriously that's what it's called. It's really easy and this job only took about an hour. I did top, and bottom. The good thing about it is that it become like a petrified coat over it as if it was made or printed professionally.
     
  4. Syncrosect

    Syncrosect Well-Known Member

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    No more man card? We're all playing with toys here; I'm not sure all relevant my man card was to begin with. But that looks pretty cool! Good use of those manuals that would've have otherwise just sat there. Like decoupage, but cooler.
     
  5. BLOODRAGED189

    BLOODRAGED189 In it for the engineering

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    I might try that with Voyager boxes, thanks!
     
  6. destrongerlupus

    destrongerlupus Well-Known Member

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    Modge podge is GREAT stuff, also know traditionally as "decoupage" you can use it for all kinds of cool stuff, including ading faction symbols to toys or whatever.

    You sir, get +10 man points.
     
  7. the_last_toltek

    the_last_toltek technobot

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    Thanks guys
     
  8. the_last_toltek

    the_last_toltek technobot

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    how easy is that and how do you keep it smooth?
     
  9. destrongerlupus

    destrongerlupus Well-Known Member

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    Very easy, the key is using thin layers and building it up slowly over a few layers, you actually can manage to get it perfectly smooth so it seems less like a sticker and more like a tampograph, which traditional appeal of decoupage.

    You'll probably want to lightly sand the surface of the toy first to give the adhesive something to grab on to.

    The Modge Podge stuff is great, but thinned white glue will even do the trick.

    D/L
     
  10. Plainsjumper

    Plainsjumper Well-Known Member

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    Building shelves = manly
     
  11. the_last_toltek

    the_last_toltek technobot

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    do you have any that you could post in here, i'd love to see some examples. Then i'd love to try that on a custom i'm working on right now.
     
  12. destrongerlupus

    destrongerlupus Well-Known Member

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    Not handy, unfortunately, when kidbash.com was still alove and I was blogging for them I did a whole article on it, I gave Energon SteamHammer a minicon symbol that I cut out of a catalog (which was a nonsensical choice, but that wasn't the point)

    I'll poke around a little and see what I can find, otherwise I might cook up somehting new.

    That said, you've already done a great job with the shelves, this is the same thing on a smaller scale.

    Edit- Internet Wayback Machine FTW! (if the Mods want, I'd be happy to have this archived as a proper tutorial)
    http://web.archive.org/petabox/20100314232641/http://www.kidbash.com/blog/atom.xml


    Fancy French Faction Symbols


    Monday, March 08, 2010, 11:44:03 PM |

    When I was a kid one of my earliest “mods” was to add Transformer faction symbols to non-Transformer robot toys. Well meaning relatives bought the occasional Shogun Warrior or Go-Bot, and while I usually thought the toy was cool, I wasn’t happy unless they were sporting a faction-emblem. (In retrospect, I wish I had been creative enough as a kid to find value in “neutrals,” but I digress).

    In that era before Reprolabels, or the ability to print water-slide decals at home on your inkjet printer, my solution was a simple, if inelegant, one. I would cut the symbols out of the catalogs that were packed in with the toys and use invisible tape to affix the emblems. It was ugly, and decidedly non-permanent, but my child-self was onto something.

    In our world of print-media (and on-demand color printing) there’s an almost infinite supply of logos, symbols, and other decorations that you could cut out and attach to your toys for decoration. Scotch-tape is a lousy way to affix these cut-outs, but if there was a better solution, it might be a lot quicker, easier, and cheaper than creating your own waterslides, and it might work better than most of the “sticker paper” that is readily available for the home-printer.

    You guessed it, there IS a solution. It’s called “decoupage.” That’s French for “to cut up.” It’s mostly used by crafty-moms to decorate switch-plates and the like, but as I mentioned in a previous article, there’s a lot of good robot building stuff in the craft aisle!

    I’m only going to cover the most basic technique here, but if you want to do more research there’s a million articles on the subject online, and you can accomplish all kinds of really compelling effects, including applying your “cut outs” to textured surfaces (like the sculpted body of a toy, for instance), and building up the finish so that the applied cut out feels seamless as compared to the surface it’s been applied to. Great stuff, and cheap and easy in the bargain! Let’s have a look-
    [​IMG]
    I started with some basic materials:
    A robot to receive a new emblem
    A catalog to cut something out of
    A pair of scissors to cut with
    An old paint brush
    A pointed tool
    A bit of sandpaper (I like Testor’s flexible model-grade stuff)
    “Mod Podge”
    Mod Podge is water-soluble adhesive/finish specially formulated for this kind of work. You can use regular white glue for a lot of decoupage applications but since we’re doing toys instead of scrap-books, I suggest spending the extra couple of bucks (I think that bottle cost me like $6), to get the real stuff.

    So our first step is to simply cut out the image we want to pate onto our figure. I cut out this minicon emblem. Why? Because I needed an example, and I wanted to pick something that I DIDN’T have a million actual decals of.
    [​IMG]
    Next I sand the place I want to apply the cut-out. The idea here is to rough up the surface just a little to give the adhesive something to stick to.
    [​IMG]
    With the surface roughed up, I’ll now use my brush to spread a little of the Mod Podge on the toy:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    With the adhesive spread around, the next step is to apply the cut out to the toy, this is where the pointed-tool comes in handy (You want to keep your fingers out of the equation as much as possible, fingerprints are never our friend!)
    [​IMG]
    I also used a moistened brush to thin out the Mod Podge and spread it around a little more evenly. It’s perfectly fine to cover over the top of the cut-out or to spread the adhesive around the area, it will dry completely clear.
    [​IMG]
    It dries after just a few minutes, and now it’s just a matter of building up layers. With a little time and a bit of patience you can build up the area around the cut-out to create a totally smooth surface, with the cut out essentially laminated into your figure.
    [​IMG]

    After the first few layers, I suggest working around the cut out and not going over the top of the paper-piece any more. Once it’s well adhered, you want to concentrate on building up the surrounding area so as to create a smooth surface.
    [​IMG]
    So SteamHammer is now proud to be a mincon! To do a good job I’d need to add a lot more layers, and I should have taken more care to apply thin coats and avoid air-bubbles, but even this quicky slap-dash effort has yielded a good looking result, and when I rub my finger across it, it actually feels more like the slight-raised area of a tampograph than like a sticker, with some more layers to blend it, even that subtle difference in surface texture could be worked away.

    A couple of quick notes about inkjet prints. Because the Mod Podge (or most other products that you can use this technique with) is water based, it can and will cause inkjet print-outs to bleed. There are a few easy fixes for this. You can use a spray fixative like the kind used for inkjet-waterslide decals (But that kind of defeats the cost-savings). You can spray your print out with hairspray (reportedly the cheaper the better). Or finally you could make a color-photocopy of your inkjet-print.

    And there you have it. We’re blessed in this age of Internet commerce that there is a LOT of support for our art-form, so this is probably not an every-day technique. However, I know every once in a while I want to add a particular something to a custom, and there’s not always a ready-made decal or water-slide available. If that special-something happens to appear in a magazine, book, or even as an image on a webpage, this CAN be the road of least resistance to go from 2D graphic to 3D deco.

    Next week, silk-flower-arrangements as Beast Machines era energon-weapons.
    I’m kidding.
    Do you have a crazy quilting-circle technique to make your super robots extra cool? Let us know about it in the comments below!
     
  13. TWINTURBO

    TWINTURBO Mandiprime97's badass :)

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    nice job,