Cobra Kai Syndrome

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by flamepanther, Jan 3, 2017.

  1. flamepanther

    flamepanther Interested, but not really

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2005
    Posts:
    15,352
    Trophy Points:
    337
    Likes:
    +5,735
    There's possibly a real name for this, but I don't know what it is. I've noticed a tendency where people who clearly have tons of natural talent will jump straight into the advanced stuff in their field and have a lot of success right away, but as a result they never master the basics. Flashy advanced moves, no fundamentals, hence I'm calling it "Cobra Kai Syndrome" until I find out an existing name for it. I don't think it's about how young someone is when they hit success or how long it takes them to become successful per se--only that becoming too successful before they master the basics stops them from ever mastering those basics. A couple of prominent examples in my mind:

    Rob Liefeld: Comes up with some pretty cool characters. Extremely talented at linework and detailing. Has a natural sense of dynamism. Master of the 1990s "edgy" comics aesthetic. Got scouted by Todd McFarlane and boosted to career stardom before he could learn the framework those things should be built on. He never learned anatomy or perspective, so he has no idea how to draw feet or where to actually put all those cool shading and musculature details he's so good at drawing.

    J. J. Abrams: Good eye for composition when he's not spamming lens flares or trying too hard to get creative. Knows what will look cool in an action scene. Works really well with actors and is able to draw performances out of them that are fun and endear the characters to the audience. Still hasn't figured out why a plot is important or how it works. This leads to films (and TV) consisting of a lot of scenes that, while great individually, don't always seem to follow a natural progression of events. His seat-of-the-pants "what's a plot" approach leads him to lean too hard on creating a forced sense of mystery or trying to surprise the audience. It hampers his ability to present useful contexts or build up to meaningful payoffs for the characters he's so good at drawing out of his actors.

    This is of course my interpretation, and there's no proof that these people would have ever mastered the basics even had they not become super-successful. But I think it does have some explanatory merit.

    Has anyone else noticed this type of effect from natural talent and too much success?
     
    • Like Like x 4
  2. seali_me

    seali_me RIP January 2018

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2007
    Posts:
    19,845
    Trophy Points:
    337
    Likes:
    +2,373
    Boooooo!

    I was expecting leg sweep analogies.

    :D 
     
    • Like Like x 6
  3. SCPrime

    SCPrime Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2006
    Posts:
    4,690
    News Credits:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    262
    Likes:
    +537
    Most NBA players. Tim Duncan was the last true great player with fundamental skills.
     
  4. gil

    gil Godmaster

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2002
    Posts:
    2,888
    Trophy Points:
    307
    Likes:
    +380
    Roy Jones Jr. Pound for Pound, one of the greats in Boxing. His Athleticism was unmatched in the ring. First Middleweight Champion to become a Heavyweight Champion in over 100 years. But time takes its toll and when it took away his speed and reflexes, he didn't have the fundamentals to fall back on. Boxers he beat early in his career like Bernard Hopkins and James Toney were still threats later in their careers because they had better fundamentals. MMA probably has an equivalent. Right now, none more famous than Ronda Rousey.
     
  5. seali_me

    seali_me RIP January 2018

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2007
    Posts:
    19,845
    Trophy Points:
    337
    Likes:
    +2,373
    Ronda "hands up/head movement" Rousey.

    Hideo " where's the action in action game" Kojima. If he was an actual movie director I bet he'd make a 6 hour long boring one.

    Shaquille "forgot to practice shooting a ball" O'Neil.

    Most if not all current rappers.
     
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2017
  6. KA

    KA Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2003
    Posts:
    23,425
    News Credits:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    412
    Likes:
    +258
    its just flash over fundamentals. and it affects generally performance orientated activities where talent is a commodity (talent can come naturally unlike skills which are developed). u can see it in arts (visual and performance), even in writing. sports like mentioned above.

    a lot of young talent become bust professionally because other pros expose their poor fundamentals, where these things are forgiven when theyre young. or if u dont develop beyond your initial potential you can become exposed too.

    in TF nerd speak, think hot rod being granted the matrix and struggling as rodimus prime. lol
     
    • Like Like x 1