Heavy/Scratch: Casting with Superglue? A poor man's alternative to resin casting.

Discussion in 'Radicons Customs' started by Quantum25, Jun 20, 2013.

  1. Snake_eyes1975

    Snake_eyes1975 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2010
    Posts:
    8,773
    News Credits:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    287
    Location:
    Michigan
    Likes:
    +2,734
    Ebay:
    Perfect example for use of the garage vacuform..Is to replace a seeker jet canopy with a whole different color and things.

    Wow...This thread brings up old memories of casting parts like this with my dad when building models.
     
  2. Quantum25

    Quantum25 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2011
    Posts:
    2,182
    Trophy Points:
    202
    Likes:
    +106
    That is some amazing stuff right there, wow! Thanks for sharing.
     
  3. Crazen

    Crazen TF Animated

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2010
    Posts:
    123
    Trophy Points:
    56
    Likes:
    +11
    Wow. Another good tip. Ill definitely use it. Thanks for this tutorial man!! Thumbs up!!
     
  4. Quantum25

    Quantum25 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2011
    Posts:
    2,182
    Trophy Points:
    202
    Likes:
    +106
    I'm looking forward to see what you and everyone else are able to do with this technique. Thanks for taking a look at my tutorial! :) 
     
  5. cheetor71

    cheetor71 Autobot

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2009
    Posts:
    5,145
    Trophy Points:
    191
    Likes:
    +9
    I've used superglue as gap filler but never would have thought of this.
     
  6. phantro

    phantro Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2003
    Posts:
    908
    Trophy Points:
    222
    Likes:
    +79
    Ebay:
    That was neat, thank you for sharing. :) 
     
  7. TM2 Dinobot

    TM2 Dinobot closet otaku

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2003
    Posts:
    6,487
    News Credits:
    6
    Trophy Points:
    337
    Likes:
    +5,142
    Ebay:
    oh my gosh, that's amazing.
     
  8. THEdeathsHEAD

    THEdeathsHEAD All are dead, yes?

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2010
    Posts:
    997
    Trophy Points:
    202
    Likes:
    +1,128
    Very cool!
    Can you glue plastic to your new part? Will they bond?
     
  9. Quantum25

    Quantum25 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2011
    Posts:
    2,182
    Trophy Points:
    202
    Likes:
    +106
    Thanks for taking a look at my thread! :)  Hope it comes in handy one day.

    Thanks for the complement!

    Yes, you can glue plastic to the new part. I recommend sanding the piece down until it's a more workable shape first; mainly the mold flash.

    You can also continue to use super glue and baking soda to build up the piece, along with using the SG+BS combo to help fill in the gaps and strengthen the bond between the plastic and the new part.
     
  10. titan

    titan Still Vehicon

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2009
    Posts:
    967
    Trophy Points:
    111
    Likes:
    +0
    ^^This is a great write-up. Thanks so much.

    Question: After the initial superglue swirl to coat the mold, you add baking soda and then dump the excess. On the subsequent adding of superglue, do you swirl again? Or just simply add more SB to start "filling" the mold, and then BS, dump, fill some more? Do you swirl at each step?
     
  11. Quantum25

    Quantum25 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2011
    Posts:
    2,182
    Trophy Points:
    202
    Likes:
    +106
    After dumping out the excess BS, you're going to be left with a rough surface on the inside of the mold (this being the solid produced by the SG and BS) and there's also going to be some baking soda still left inside. Because of this, it makes it hard to be able to swirl SG in the mold since it would catch on the nooks and crannies of the previous layer along with beginning to react with the baking soda already in the mold. This also makes it harder for the SG to pool up on you, more on that down below. So swirling the SG around the mold isn't necessary after the first layer is done.

    Specifically, after the excess BS is dumped out, I fill the mold with a thin layer of SG, enough that coats the previous layer and the sides of the mold, but not to the point where it pools up at the bottom of the mold. This differs from mold to mold, but generally with conical molds, pooling is a bigger issue.

    However, if you do end up adding too much if can be easily fixed by dabbing away the excess with a paper towel or something else to absorb the SG. While applying the SG, if it gets stuck on anything, I use the tip of my super glue bottle to help spread it around to evenly coat everything.

    After adding the BS, I keep repeating the process until the mold is full.

    Once you get the hang of it, you can tell when too much SG is too much since the point of swirling is to prevent the SG from pooling up in the initial layer of SG & BS. You don't really need to swirl in the latter steps as it's harder for the SG to pool up since it has stuff to stick too, so as long as you're careful applying the SG, you should be fine.

    Should it end up pooling, it can really ruin your part if you don't notice right away, and makes for a terrible mess when you're removing the part from the mold; super glue gets all over your fingers, the part is ruined, etc.

    :lol  This explanation seems rather long, but hopefully it answers your question. Thanks for taking a look at my tutorial and thanks for the question. I really appreciate being able to answer them to help clarify certain details I may have overlooked in my tutorial.

    Best Wishes and hopefully Happy Casting
    - Q25
     
  12. titan

    titan Still Vehicon

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2009
    Posts:
    967
    Trophy Points:
    111
    Likes:
    +0
    ^Q25, that is GREAT detail and specifics right there. Thanks for jumping on my question promptly and thoroughly - much appreciated.
     
  13. gargunkle

    gargunkle someone

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2007
    Posts:
    4,735
    Trophy Points:
    212
    Likes:
    +34
    My usual method for making heads is the one described here: http://www.tfw2005.com/boards/tutorials-how-tos/214515-easy-guide-making-custom-heads.html
    with 2-part putty like Magic-Sculpt. My results vary. Usually I can make most heads work with this but some are difficult. Also one factor I don't really like is that I have to mix the putty and then come back ~2.5 hours later (depends on which kind of putty you use of course).

    I started experimenting with the superglue/baking soda method. The results so far are promising. I like how well the kneaded eraser takes the details of a part (head). Typically much better than the putty does. I did notice that the resulting SG part may be somewhat brittle so I started filling it up with putty (maybe I just need to layer the SG more though).

    I am using Loc-Tite SG (usually found in hardware section rather than office supplies) and I don't actually notice any heat/fumes during the process. Wonder if it's a different chemical compound.

    Worst part so far is just how hard it is to get the eraser off the casted part.
     
  14. konrathink

    konrathink Jared Magnus

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2007
    Posts:
    2,417
    Trophy Points:
    262
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    Likes:
    +800
    I've tried this method about 6 times with a Gen Voyager Springer head. 90%-95% or the mold is amazing. It get the eye detail and groves in some of the vents. But, there is always that 5% or so of the mold that has an air pocket in it and because of the size, it makes it near impossible to fill in or fix (at least with the SG / BS). Is there anything more workable that will stick to the finished product to fill in small defects?

    I love this method, and perhaps it's just the Springer head, so I will be experiment more with other heads and perhaps weapons.

    Thanks for this tutorial!

    (I also tried silly putty for the mold, but I think the chemical reaction heats up and distorts the silly putty is spots)
     
  15. The621

    The621 Fuck you, that's why!

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2006
    Posts:
    5,022
    News Credits:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    232
    Likes:
    +86
    Should've done this instead of buying EasyCast. Shit was a lie. Couldn't make any balljoints with it.
     
  16. actual customs

    actual customs Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2013
    Posts:
    272
    Trophy Points:
    92
    Likes:
    +26
    Thanks for putting this up
     
  17. Superquad7

    Superquad7 OCP Police Crime Prevention Unit 001 Super Content Contributor

    Joined:
    May 19, 2003
    Posts:
    51,319
    News Credits:
    15
    Trophy Points:
    447
    Likes:
    +5,276
    Twitter:
  18. Dormamu

    Dormamu I am Broot.

    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2007
    Posts:
    5,545
    News Credits:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    287
    Location:
    Clarksburg, MD
    Likes:
    +457
    Would mold release (or whatever it's called) or spraying some PAM in there help instead of just dusting it with baking soda to release it from the kneaded eraser? Just curious because I <really> want to try this.
     
  19. gargunkle

    gargunkle someone

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2007
    Posts:
    4,735
    Trophy Points:
    212
    Likes:
    +34
    Personally I haven't had any problems getting original parts out of the eraser so far, but getting the casted SG part separated from the eraser is much harder and more time-consuming.

    It may work, but I'm not 100% certain of the durability.

    For something with decent thickness (like say, a robot head) I think it will be okay, but thinner parts may be brittle.
     
  20. Quantum25

    Quantum25 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2011
    Posts:
    2,182
    Trophy Points:
    202
    Likes:
    +106
    It's good to hear that you're having promising results with this, but I agree, trying to clean off the final part is a major pain. I'm sure there are some solvents out there that can dissolve the eraser, but I rather not have to deal with harsh chemical. I've found that letting the piece soak in some rubbing alcohol (91%) for a bit helps "loosen up" the eraser, but it still takes a good 10-15 minutes to scrub all of it off.

    Also, thanks for mentioning the brittleness issue. I haven't had any problems with any casted part breaking on me yet, but I've noticed that while I'm cleaning off the flash from the part, if I'm not careful it ends up tearing a small chuck off the edge. There's also how size may factor into the problem, since the larger the part, the more layers are needed, so I'm going to look into that. At least reinforcing it with putty works.

    Thanks for feedback! I believe some kind of putty or apoxie sculpt would fill up those air pockets quite nicely, especially if they're in the hard to reach crevices of the part.

    I also wouldn't mind if you guys could post up pics of your casts, I'll love to see how your casts turn out.

    Unfortunately, you're probably better off buying balljoints or scavenging them from other toys instead of casting them. I don't believe the baking soda/super glue compound can hold up to the stress of being a balljoint. :( 
    However, I can make a recommendation for Hobby Base balljoints.

    :) 

    :)  Thanks!

    Presumably, using some kind of mold release would help get the original part out easier, though I haven't had any problems removing the original part. The dusting of baking soda also doubles as something for the initial coat of super glue stick to and react with so you can get a crisp cast that retains as much detail as it can from the mold. It's something I'll look into since as long as the superglue doesn't react negatively with the mold release/PAM etc. and the resulting cast retains enough detail, it'll be something worth doing. But in the meantime, we're stuck with scrubbing away the excess eraser.

    If you happen to get to trying out the mold release before I do, I'll love to hear how it went. Also, it's great to see that you're interested in trying this out. I'm mean all of this literally started as a spur of the moment kinda thing where I thought "I wonder if this would work?", and after a couple tests, it worked, so don't be afraid to try out new ideas with this. :) 

    And Gargunkle is spot on with the durability of the casts, a nice thick part is quite solid, but thinner parts can be more brittle.