Back to school advice thread

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by JaZzPrImE74, Jul 29, 2018.

  1. JaZzPrImE74

    JaZzPrImE74 Sub to my YT Supreme J

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    Hey guys, so I’m going to be a junior this year and i see ALOT of negative things about junior year but no one ever elaborates why, can i get some tips advice please?
     
  2. UltraAlanMagnus

    UltraAlanMagnus See ya!

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    Lay low, do your school work. Never be late, always attend every day.
     
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  3. MetalRyde

    MetalRyde is an a-hole with a heart.

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    Don't slack off.
    Study hard.
    But casually take a break once in a while.
    And at this point, decide what you want to do with your life.

    (Saying "I want to rock" is not a valid choice)
     
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  4. Aernaroth

    Aernaroth <b><font color=blue>I voted for Super_Megatron and Veteran

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    Set good habits early. When you get up, when you do your homework, when you go to sleep, when you work out,what you eat, etc. It's easier to do that and then stick with them than to try and break bad habits later.

    Start thinking about what you want to do with your life as an adult. You don't need to be super-specific, but if you know the sort of thing you might want to do as a career, you can look backwards towards what education that requires or can be supported by, and what kind of classes or extracurricular activities you can do to prepare yourself for that. If you find you don't like the path you're taking, you've got plenty of time to change it, but basically every road to success is paved with hard work, so don't expect things to be quick or easy.

    Work hard. Literally everything you're doing now is an opportunity to learn and grow as a person, whether you realize or not. This doesn't necessarily mean you should focus on your studies 24/7 (if anything, a more well-rounded lifestyle is better for you in the long run), but it does mean that while you're in class (or doing anything, really) that you should be focused on that, giving it your best, and trying to get as much out of it as you can.

    Have fun. High school IS a lot of work, but its only going to get tougher from there. You're becoming an adult, gaining more and more responsibilities as you take more and more control over your life, but that also means you're still free from some of the obligations and responsibilities adults have. Take advantage of that while you can, and enjoy yourself and the company of the people around you while you can. Naturally, don't get yourself into trouble or cause trouble for others, but don't be afraid to stretch your legs as the world available to you expands around you.

    Don't sweat it. Whether you're willing to admit it or not, you're an immature person, surrounded by (probably) hundreds of other immature people. You and they are going to make mistakes, and are going to do things that you may look back on years from now and wonder at the stupidity of (just like you can do now with stuff you did 10 years ago). This is normal, and part of the aging process. High School is a small (if not important) part of your life, and whatever happens, it too shall pass. If you're lucky, you'll hold onto at least some of the relationships you make in high school, but expect that many of them (as well as people's memories of most of the things you've done, for better or worse) to fade over time. That being said, be mindful, be compassionate, and do the right thing as often as you can. This is a grander version of setting those good habits early that I mentioned at the start of this post.
     
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  5. Macross7

    Macross7 Well-Known Member

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    You are with the same people you have been with. Just keep doing what you have been. Its not like being a Junior is some massive step up. Probably a big change is people are going to start to drive.
     
  6. Blackout32

    Blackout32 MEGADETH - Rust in Peace

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    I'd say do your homework but enjoy being a junior in school cause before you know it you'll graduate and then that is when life really starts. What i mean is have fun but not to much that you forget to do a eassy paper or something. Stick with your best friends and try to get classes with them whenever possible.
     
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  7. KnightSaberAmi

    KnightSaberAmi Nyan Nyan

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    Dude High School is easy af. See here's the thing I figured out a little too late. Double up if you can. Meaning you have a credit system, get used to it you're going to be verrry familiar with it in college/uni. You require so many credits to move on academically from Jr. to Sr. years. If you can, try to take a literature and English writing class this coming semester, instead of an elective if you can hack it. Take the 2 Senior Level Language Arts classes in the spring.

    Your summer going into Senior year take both senior mathematics. Personally, I was always better off in a 3-hour math class A/B vs C/D regular 40min math class which was why I preferred summer school in hs/coll. This will allow you in your senior year to start college-level courses and have mostly electives sr year.

    Read 3 Chapters ahead in all classes, regardless, and take notes. You will familiarize yourself with terms and techniques before walking into it cold. Should you have any issues with any of the material take it up with the teacher. I was more of a show-me than read it to me kind of learner. Should your teacher give you: "the you didn't read the required chapter bull" like mine tried to give me, pull out your notes from reading and tell her to kiss your ass like I did to mine in college in front of the dean.

    B**** try me now.

    Study for exams/tests/qizzes. Write papers as soon as you get the assignment. Research papers are the easiest to write as well as comparison and contrast. The nice thing about it, it has its own bibliography, so utilize Wikipedia, but do not cite it, cite its sources.

    I feel like I just gave you the keys to the kingdom, young padawan, use this information wisely.
     
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  8. Rodimus74

    Rodimus74 Well-Known Member

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    Star figuring out now what you want to do for the rest of your life. Pick a career and dedicate yourself to achieving it. Or else you'll end up a loser with a dead end job and no will to live, like me.
     
  9. JaZzPrImE74

    JaZzPrImE74 Sub to my YT Supreme J

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    Thanks to everyone for the advice , i have a question , when i think about what i want go do and what i truly enjoy doing it sort of fall in the same thing, unlike most when they think of what they want to do and say nurse, Dr, police man, i am different. I want to be a YouTuber, but everything about that is self made really but i know that i must need a backup plan , one that would definitely require me to go to college, so my question is this...

    In the next 2 years how much should i focus on my dream, and trying to find something else i enjoy that i guess you could say would gurantee that im not still living with my parents at 25 if it dosent work out.

    This is the biggest problem i am facing. I know that with hard work and dedication that i can make my dream of being successful come true , but i know that i have to be smart and also have a backup plan, i just don’t know how much time and effort i should spend on it .
     
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  10. Aernaroth

    Aernaroth <b><font color=blue>I voted for Super_Megatron and Veteran

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    We've gone through this discussion before, and what I said then still stands. I'd add now that if you think everything about being a youtuber is self-taught and you're not going to reap any benefit from higher education, then you're not thinking hard enough about educational opportunities. Diplomas in A/V tech or media production, acting/drama, marketing or promotions, all of these could help you develop skills that would be complementary to being a youtuber, and give you connections to an industry that (while difficult to break into) you could potentially derive an income from while trying to follow your dream.

    But to be frank with you, in the year or two since we last talked about this, how much progress have you made? How many more subscribers do you have, and do you feel like you're on a path to the numbers you'd need to make a living off of (especially with youtube clawing back more and more money from content creators as time goes on, if what I hear is true)? Do YOU feel like it's something that will lead to your long-term success and happiness if you devote all or most of your time to it? There's no reason you couldn't do it as a hobby, like many other youtubers (especially in the transformers community), what else do you think you'd be satisfied doing for a living, and what do you think it will take to get there? How much time will that leave for your dream?
     
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  11. Moonscream

    Moonscream YES, We Exist, and We DON'T Want to Date You

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    Nothing's better than the school of life! Go out in the woods, strip off all your clothes, and learn to live amongst the wolves. When society collapses, you'll have the skills to survive!

    :D 

    --Moony
     
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  12. Starfire22

    Starfire22 :D

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    :lol 
     
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  13. Fallout

    Fallout a dude he can't lose when lives on love

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    junior year was a weird year for me for a lot of reasons. some of those are specific to my experience, but a lot of it was because i got my first job and first car. a lot of people did. sophomore and junior year of high school is when most people really become young adults because of those. you're probably gonna have to learn how to balance work and school if you haven't already, and take a lot more responsibility for things like insurance if you're just about to start driving.

    best thing you can do, though, is getting ahead. start looking into post-high school shit now. take your act/sat this year. even if you don't plan on college, having one act/sat score under your belt isn't a hard thing to do and will pay off later.

    keep in mind that 90% of your peers are going through the same stuff as you. you're all going down a similar path right now, and everybody's stressed. don't judge people without knowing their situation fully, be patient, and be the bigger person.

    and enjoy the ride. it gets more harrowing as your high school experience starts to draw to an end, and you don't want to spend all your time stressing. you can have fun and work hard at the same time. it may take time finding the balance for you, but you'll find it. have good times.
     
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  14. edgs2099

    edgs2099 Optimistically realistic. Moderator TFW2005 Supporter

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    This. While I could never give anyone the advice to try and be internet famous, if you're going to do it, learn the tech side and if no one ends up giving a shit about YOUR youtube channel, you may be able to use said skills to pay required bills for someone with a successful channel.
     
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  15. JaZzPrImE74

    JaZzPrImE74 Sub to my YT Supreme J

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    Thanks for all of the great advice guys. Finding a balance will definitely be a challenge but once i do im sure thing with be way more smooth
     
  16. ByteBack

    ByteBack Well-Known Member

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    Note: I grew up and went to school in Scotland, so the school system is a bit different. I started secondary / high school at 11, but I imagine the stresses and change in environment were similar. I'm going on my own experiences which were 30 years ago (yikes!!)

    So why is being in the first year of the next level of education tough? Here's why.


    Everything is different: new teachers, new way of working, new time table, a new school that may not have any any idea how to navigate, new subjects and even the old subjects you had at school somehow managed to change. It was a lot adjust to in a short period of time and it could get a bit stressful.

    Everybody is different: you end up being put into classes with people you don't know. As if it wasn't stressful enough dealing with a change in environment, you also have to try and somehow make friends. Not only that, the people you knew at school before the summer may not be the people who come back. There was a lot of growing up happening in the summer I moved from primary to secondary / high school.

    There's a lot of work: and a lot more than you're used to. There was homework for a start, which I hadn't had to do since I was six (school starts at 5 years in the UK) and it always seemed like there was never enough time to get stuff done!

    You're new and an easy target: In my school, you were usually thrown into the rose bushes and referred to as a "pleb" by in your first year by the older pupils. Pleb is a Latin work meaning the "common person" which goes to show that bullies can sometimes be quite sophisticated.

    How to survive it.

    Like everybody else has said, keep your head down. Pay attention and don't let the stress get to you. If you ever find it too much to deal with, just take it one step at a time. Don't expect too much of yourself - don't punish yourself if you find it too much to deal with or if you mess something up. These things happen, and remember; school is not the be-all-and-end-all of your life. In just a few years, you'll be done with it.

    Everybody finds school tough, especially when moving up to the next level of your education. If anybody looks as if it's easy, all that means is that they're really good at hiding it.

    Oh...and say if one day for phys ed during the autumn when you have to play basketball in doors, and you forget your PE kit, and the PE teacher throws a ball at your head because you're too interested in the suddenly VERY interesting jiggling motion that is happening in the girls PE lesson; remember not to get angry. Whatever you do, do NOT walk up to the PE teacher when he demands that you give the ball back and when he shouts that he meant you to throw the ball to him, do NOT UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCES, throw the ball at his face at point-blank-range and give him a bloody nose.

    They tend to not like that sort of thing.
     
  17. ILoveDinobot

    ILoveDinobot *º* Hockey Mom *º*

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    You are worrying about school already? When do you start?
     
  18. JaZzPrImE74

    JaZzPrImE74 Sub to my YT Supreme J

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    August 8th
     
  19. raindance773

    raindance773 Well-Known Member

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    I'm probably going to rub against the grain here, but I refuse to blow smoke. As a teacher who had a career before teaching (in the military) I have seen a lot of kids who want to do something similar to being a professional Youtuber or do something like design video games. Those are awesome, and I wish I could say those pan out. But, they don't, just like most people aren't Lebron James and aren't going to break into designing video games (because those guys and girls are a dime a dozen and the market is saturated to the point if you're not top flight, you're basically expendable). Truth is, kids don't and I see them flipping burgers after high school trying to get their life together. Then they ask me if they can still do some of the things I told them they should have done as Juniors and Seniors, and they can, but they've lost two years of wage earning on their peers who listened to adults in the years prior.

    You have to look at some serious things like:

    1. Will you be able to afford necessities (shelter - a place to stay; food - because eating is important; bills - because you have to pay those; clothing - need that too; insurance - medical and everything else; transportation; etc.)? While it may not sound really important, the Rule of Threes kind of applies because you will find not having a place to stay (homelessness) and being hungry, thirsty, and dirty sucks and can dramatically alter your quality and quantity of life.

    2. Can the job you are doing support you in the future when your desires change and you want to do something like get married, have a family, relocate, go to school, etc. At 19, getting high, working at an entry level position, or living in Mom and Dad's basement bumming their booze and food seems okay. But there is a purpose for your life, and at 20, those same things are starting to get tacky, and at 21, they are downright moldy.

    So, sorry, I would really give you the advice that your backup plan needs to become your primary plan and having a thriving YouTube channel should become a goal and a hobby instead. If it makes money, more power to you. I would, however (if you're American), do all of the things below (and if you're not, do them anyways, because they are gateways to citizenship in the U.S. and most other countries as well):

    1. Take the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery. It's free. Plus, for five or six years of service you get an actual set of skills that can be marketed in the real world, and you get the Post-9/11 G.I. Bill, a benefit which is potentially worth thousands of dollars if you use it correctly. Also, they changed the standards recently so now you a forced to invest in your 401(k) from the day you ship to Basic until you're out. Plus, you've served and that's really something to be valued, and you get to see the world. #SemperFiuntilIdie.

    2. Look at vocational schools (auto mechanics, WELDING, air conditioning repair, roofing, etc.). You may thing, "nah, not for me," until you realize that a fully qualified welder makes more than most white collar jobs. Want to finance a YouTube channel quickly? Learn a trade and do it well and money will come to you (for example, think of all the people who have to get car maintenance done - it's a steady flow of business ALWAYS. Similarly, all those people whose heat or A/C goes out in the summer and winter - it's $100 just to have them LOOK at your stuff and tell you what's wrong with it).

    3. Look at Community Colleges to see if you even want to go to college. More bang for your buck.

    4. Look at applying to West Point, the Air Force Academy, and the Naval Academy, or ROTC. Nothing is better than a free ride to school in exchange for four years of service and the G.I. Bill and Officer pay. Make them tell you no.

    5. Look at scholarships if going to a traditional four year school is how you want to do it. It's expensive, and the payoff is limited. I would steer away from liberal arts unless you want to join the military or teach. The jobs for liberal arts are hard to come by, sadly. So, this really needs to come with a plan on what you realistically want to do because they will take your money, absolutely, but what are you getting in return for your money and effort?

    All that said, take 10 minutes, and watch a pretty good (actually a really good video) from Mike Rowe (the guy who does the TV show Dirty Jobs).

     
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  20. ILoveDinobot

    ILoveDinobot *º* Hockey Mom *º*

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    Oh wow, is that in the USA?