Artificial intelligence creates a manga

Discussion in 'Comic Books and Graphic Novels' started by QLRformer, Jun 7, 2020.

  1. QLRformer

    QLRformer Seeker

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    Phaedo: Kioxia Debuts First English AI-Designed Manga

    Kioxia Corporation announced that it will release an English translation of the artificial intelligence-designed manga Phaedo.

    In a press release, Kioxia billed the upcoming manga as "the world’s first international manga created through human collaboration, high-speed and large-capacity memory and advanced AI technologies." The collaboration between AI and human input is based on the artistic style of the "Father of Manga" Osamu Tezuka.

    "Phaedo is the story of a homeless philosopher and his robot bird, Apollo, who try to solve crimes in Tokyo in 2030."

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    n order to recreate Tezuka's overall style, the AI studied the characteristics of his writing and characters from over 130 issues, including Astro Boy and Black Jack. This allowed them to create 129 possible stories, new story outlines and physical characteristics for new characters. All the research and data went on to inform the collaboration between Kioxia's engineers, Tezuka Productions Co.'s illustrators and writers and researchers from Keio University and Future University Hakodate.


    What grabbed my attention was the Artificial Intelligence working on this. But it's not really sentient but still on a programmed leash by its engineers, it's more something novel rather than a computer milestone. Still, it's something notable.
     
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  2. SouthtownKid

    SouthtownKid Headmaster

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    I guess it's easier to get one AI to recreate Tezuka than try to enact that "infinite number of monkeys with typewriters" plan to reproduce Shakespeare.

    I see they still need humans to actually draw it, though.