Why was the Neo Geo so expensive

Discussion in 'Video Games and Technology' started by jorod74, Nov 22, 2009.

  1. jorod74

    jorod74 Psycholagnist (Ret.)

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    I wanted a Neo Geo console when they came out, but $600 for the consoloe, and $275 for the cartridges was unbelievable.

    so how could a company release a unit that was so prohibitive?

    and to anyone who owned it, was it worth that kind of loot?
     
  2. McBradders

    McBradders James Franco Club! Moderator

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    It was running a 16 bit processor in your home long before the SNES or Megadrive would, it also had a second 8 bit processor on board. Back then memory was prohibitively expensive and they weren't converting the games down, these were the actual arcade games running on your home television.
     
  3. hXcpunk23

    hXcpunk23 The Chaos Bringer

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    It was essentially a true home arcade system. I had one up until a few years ago (sold it off on eBay with all the AES and MVS carts and MVS Phantom-1 converter I had). It originally came out in the early 90's and it was one of the only consoles to basically do straight arcade ports to their home console. The AES carts were roughly the same size as the MVS carts (the MVS carts being the carts that were used in the actual videogame arcades).

    I didn't buy into this until years later (around 2003, I believe)--even I knew $600+ was too much back in the day. I picked up the console from a seller for about $150-$200 (can't recall the exact price) and I proceeded to buy tons of the AES & MVS carts and a Phantom-1 converter that allowed you to play the MVS carts on the AES console. In other words, I had the home arcade fun with the actual TRUE videogame arcade titles (literally the carts from the large arcade machines). In my opinion, it was WELL worth it to have those great games to play (especially the Fatal Fury, King of Fighters, and Samurai Spirits/Samurai Shodown games).

    The reason the price was so high was based on the fact that the games were cart based. If you look back at most cartridge games (especially those during that same time period like the SNES and Genesis), you'd see the high price attached to those also (between $40 & $60 a pop). I'm not certain, but I also believe the console cost upwards of $600 based on the fact that it came with actual arcade style joystick controllers (something basically unheard of at the time) and the console was packed with pretty much the same hardware that ran the games in the arcade machines.

    If you were to get into it today, you could have a very nice collection of SNK titles for a fraction of what they originally cost (hell, I still kept my Fatal Fury: Real Bout Special MVS cart because it was always one of my favorites to play--I sold everything else, but still have it and I believe it only cost me about $30-$35 a few years ago).

    I moved on to the Neo Geo CD shortly after selling off the AES console and AES/MVS carts, so I can still game with most of the games I really loved on the AES system. It may have been a bit high-priced back in the day, but now it's a steal for true arcade gameplay--and if you look around, you can get them modded (which is how mine was) to display with component cables--in other words, a MUCH better picture than previously seen on these games.

    Twin Twist with the tech specs to round it all out. Nice job, man. :) 
     

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