Who made the G1 toys ??? Various ???

Discussion in 'Transformers Toy Discussion' started by entITy, Jan 16, 2012.

  1. entITy

    entITy G 1

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    I have a question. Did hasbro deal with any factories to make g1 toys?

    I know of diacast or whatever and there were like 5 companies made transforming robots but then it seemed hasbro bought the companies and made a cartoon named TF, like a copy and slap job.

    Like devastator and raiden (never heard of until recently) were made in 1983 or so but just recolored and renamed as toys shipped here.

    Same with Omega.

    Same with prime and jetfire and...every g1 toy lol ???

    Were these diacast and takara gundam molds of toys just slapped with TF logos?

    Give me a history lesson...and why are there so many re issues and k.o. as a collector it is confusing. The fake and real g1 prime look damn near same.
     
  2. Valkysas

    Valkysas Attack Buffalo

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    Transformers come from a variety of sources, mostly Diaclone and Microchange, both by Takara.

    No Gundam toys were ever involved with Transformers.
     
  3. entITy

    entITy G 1

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    Thank you.

    So they were from 1983 and Hasbro just bought the companies and just made up the TF idea after?

    Did a Hasbro bought company, ever make their own g1 molds?

    It seems every g1 toy was molded before the idea of TF ever existed by others you mentioned.
     
  4. Shockwave9227

    Shockwave9227 I'm actually 16.

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    Pretty much this but wasn't Toyco also involved? They did create Astro Magnum, which was then made into Shockwave and wasn't there a pre-Transformers Omega Surpeme as well?
    Bandai was involved as well as they made G1 Jetfire, their only Transformers product.
     
  5. grimlock1972

    grimlock1972 "No Mas" My Wallet

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    Skylynx and Omega supreme came from a company called Toybox, Jet fire was made from the mold for a Macross/Robotech Valkyrie. Roadbuster and Whirl were molds from the Dorvack toyline. The Deluxe Insecticons came from Molds owned by Bandai. other than those I believe all molds were own by Hasbro or Takara. forgot about Shockwave.
     
  6. entITy

    entITy G 1

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    It would have been a good idea to ship raiden here when they released devastator since both are from same earlier company and both bios have them as enemies, instead of writing all these non related TF comic and toon stories that had Omega was his enemy...Omega owned him it wasnt even fair lol. I think Overlord released way later would have made a better enemy tbh.
     
  7. entITy

    entITy G 1

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    Thanks guys for answers. What under Hasbro direct (not bought another company molds) toys did they make for example? Like Jazz?
     
  8. Inikalord

    Inikalord Legal Binding Contracts

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    Practically everything Season 3 is original and not from other companies except for Ultra Magnus which was from the Diaclone toyline like most Transformers.
     
  9. Agent Adam

    Agent Adam Well-Known Member

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  10. Valkysas

    Valkysas Attack Buffalo

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    But all movie era, and post-movie toys were still engineered by Takara. Hasbro and Takara formed a partnership, rather than hasbro buying any other companies.
     
  11. The Dark Seeker

    The Dark Seeker Well-Known Member

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    The Jetfire mold was originally a Takatoku Macross VF-1S with the super parts/armor. When they used it for Jetfire, they changed the nose on the plane. The original Macross toy had a more "sharper" nose whereas Jetfire's nose in alt mode was more "stubby."
     
  12. grimlock1972

    grimlock1972 "No Mas" My Wallet

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    I am aware of that likely done for toy safety reasons or to distinguish Jetfire somewhat from the Valkyrie. I did not feel the need to get so specific but hey that great info to know .
     
  13. entITy

    entITy G 1

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    Thank you guys. About the "google" comment, the reason I joined here was to get a vast more knowledge from members here, rather than vauge google searches.

    However your right google could have been a good search, however I like the fact I can ask things here and get very fast, very specific info from many experts.
     
  14. CZ Hazard

    CZ Hazard Sons of Unicron PTT

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  15. QmTablit

    QmTablit Disguise: Check. Robot...

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  16. entITy

    entITy G 1

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    Thank you.
     
  17. entITy

    entITy G 1

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    Is a Diaclone swoop worth more than g1 swoop, both same condition ?
     
  18. QmTablit

    QmTablit Disguise: Check. Robot...

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    Don't take this as fact, as I don't know for sure, but I would imagine it is.

    For one, it's obviously an older toy. Secondly, it's actually a screen-accurate color scheme, which easily drives interest in it.

    That said, it was never released in "The Transformers" packaging, so that could be a knock against it.
     
  19. entITy

    entITy G 1

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    Ok thank you...
     
  20. Nevermore

    Nevermore It's self-perpetuating a parahumanoidarianised!

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    Okay, a better explanation.

    Back in the early 1980s, "converting robot toys" were more or less an established concept in Japan. Most of what would later become known as the 1984/85 Transformers toys was originally released in Japan as part of several toy lines that were spin-offs of a line named "Microman" by a company named Takara.

    The "Diaclone" line featured the first robot toys that could be converted into cars. Kōjin Ōno is credited for designing the first "car to robot" toy ever, which would later become known as the Autobot Sunstreaker. The Diaclone line featured the "Car Robos" (which would later become the Autobot Cars), the "Jet Robos" (which would later become the Decepticon Planes), the "Double Changers" (which would later become the Omnibots), the "Triple Changers" (of which only one would be released as a Transformer, the Decepticon Blitzwing), the "Construction Robo" (which would later become the Constructicons), the "Dinosaur Robos" (which would later become the Dinobots), the "Insecter Robos" (which would later become the Insecticons), "Battle Convoy" (which would later become Optimus Prime), "Powered Convoy" (which would later become Ultra Magnus) and more. Several planned but never released Diaclone concepts would ultimately see their release as Transformers only.

    Meanwhile, the Microman sub-line "MicroChange" featured robots that could be converted into children-scaled items such as the "Gun Robos" (two of which would later become Megatron and Masterforce-only Browning), the "MicroCassette Robos" (which would later become the Decepticon Cassettes), the "Cassette Robo" (which would later become Soundwave), the "Camera Robo" (which would later become Reflector), the "Microscope Robo" (which would later become Perceptor), the "Radio Cassette Robo" (which would later become Blaster) and the "Mini Car Robos" (which would later become the Autobot Mini-Cars).

    Other companies also released converting robot toys at the time, among them Takatoku with the Macross "Super Valkyrie" (which would later become Jetfire), the Dorvack robots (which would later become the Deluxe Autobots) and the Beetras toys (which would later become the Deluxe Insecticons), ToyBox (their only actually released toy would later become Omega Supreme, another originally unreleased toy would later become Sky Lynx) and Toyco (whose only known toy later became Shockwave).

    Takatoku, and with them the rights to their toys, were bought out by Bandai. Bandai also released their own converting robot toys named "Machine Robo".

    In 1983, representatives of Hasbro discovered the Takara toys at Tokyo Toy Fair. At that time, Takara already had some of their toys released in other countries (Takara themselves had a short run of "Diakron" in the USA and of "Diaclone" in Finland, whereas companies named GiG and Joustra released "Diaclone" toys under license from Takara in Italy and Northwestern Europe, respectively). Hasbro acquired a license from Takara to release the toys in the USA. Hasbro never bought the company Takara, they just paid money so they could sell the toys in their own market. Under normal circumstances, this would have only been a temporary lease, but because the "Transformers" brand proved so damn popular, their cooperation lasts to this very day.

    Hasbro's biggest rival at the time was Tonka, who acquired the rights to Bandai's "Machine Robo" toys and released them in the USA under the name "Go Bots". Hasbro was eager to get as many toys away from Tonka as possible, which is why they didn't only acquire the rights to Takara's toys, but also the rights to several other companies' toys, such as the aforementioned former Takaroku, ToyBox and Toyco toys. At the time, Hasbro was worried because Takatoku had been bought out by Bandai, but Bandai respected the existing licensing agreement with Hasbro and provided them with the exclusive rights to those toys instead of Tonka. In the long run, "Transformers" turned out to be more successful than the "Go Bots", and Hasbro eventually bought out Tonka in the 1990s. This is the only outright company "buyout" that is of relevance here. Also note that Hasbro only bought Tonka, but not the rights to the Machine Robo/Go Bots toys (which are still held by Bandai).

    Hasbro assigned an advertising company named Griffin Bacal to do something with the toys. Griffin Bacal suggested to merge the Diaclone and MicroChange toys into one line and name the result "The Transformers". They also suggested to divide the new toyline into the factions "Autobots" (good) and "Decepticons" (evil).

    Following that, Hasbro turned to comic book publisher Marvel to come up with a backstory and give the individual toys names and personalities. Marvel was also assigned to develop a comic book to promote the toys, and a cartoon show in cooperation with Griffin Bacal's production company Sunbow Productions.

    "The Transformers" proved to be a huge hit. So huge that Takara decided to cancel their own "Diaclone" and "MicroChange" lines and instead acquire a license from Hasbro to sell the toys as "Transformers" in Japan as well. The cartoon was dubbed into Japanese.

    As part of their own version of the "Transformers" toyline, Takara only released the toys derived from their own lines. They didn't release the Takatoku toys, because the rights to those were held by their competitor Bandai. Neither did they release the ToyBox toys. Many many years later, it turned out that the rights to those had ended up with another competitor of Takara's, Tomy. After the merger of Takara and Tomy into TakaraTomy, the merged company could "reissue" Omega Supreme and Sky Lynx in Japan... for the first time. Takara did, however, release Shockwave back in 1985. Information about Toyco is hard to come by, but a theory suggests it's actually a Korean company and therefore not a direct competitor in Takara's market, so they could just acquire the rights to that toy.

    After the initial Diaclone and MicroChange toys had been released by Hasbro, they turned to toys that had originally been intended for those lines, but hadn't been released yet due to Takara switching to "Transformers".

    After those toys had been released as well, Hasbro had Takara develop new toys based on designs created by Filipino artist Floro Dery for "The Transformers: The Movie". The results were... mediocre compared to the previous toys.

    Following that, Takara continued to design and develop new toys for shared use between them and Hasbro. Around 1988, Hasbro and Takara started to design all new toys together, with Hasbro usually handling the "concept" part and Takara handling the "engineering" part. This cooperation is continuing to this very day.

    There's additional licensing issues as far as the European market is concerned: In the early 1980s, Hasbro had merged with/bought out another company named Milton Bradley. Starting in 1985, they used MB's established infrastructure in continental Europe to release the Transformers toys there as well. Unfortunately, Takara had already licensed some of the Diaclone and MicroChange toys to a company named Joustra, so the initial MB Transformers line... had to use Jetfire as the Autobot leader, because the Optimus Prime toy was already released by Joustra. However, Joustra found themselves in severe financial problems, so they struck a deal with Hasbro/Milton Bradley and let them use "their" toys for the Transformers line as well.

    Meanwhile, in Italy, Takara licensee GiG had the glorious idea of using their Diaclone license to profit from Hasbro's success with their "Transformers" line. The result was "Trasformer", basically Diaclone toys in Diaclone-esque packaging but using color schemes created specifically for Hasbro's Transformers line. Hasbro wasn't amused and pressured GiG into acquiring a second license so they could release "Transformers" proper in Italy. GiG still benefited from their established relationship with Takara by releasing several toys in Italy that weren't available in any of Hasbro's markets (such as a Bruticus giftset, the "Set Commandos" giftset based on the Japanese "Hero Set" with the toys in their Japanese decos instead of Hasbro's Classic Pretender/Legends decos, or Galaxy Shuttle). Over the years, the GiG toys and the toys in Hasbro's European markets were more and more synchronized, and by the time of Beast Wars, GiG was completely phased out as the Italian licensee in favor of Hasbro Italy.

    In 2005, Takara merged with former rival Tomy into TakaraTomy. Outside Japan, the merged company is known as simply "Tomy". Since both companies had existing cooperations with Hasbro, the merged company decided to continue those. Because of the merger, the G1 Omega Supreme and Sky Lynx toys are now available to both Hasbro and Takara. All the Takara-developed toys, as well has the Hasbro/Takara-developed toys, are also available to both companies, with a few exceptions:
    1) Toys whose molds have been damaged or lost. Takara can restore or recast these molds, but that's an expensive procedure. There are no legal restrictions stopping them from doing so, however.
    2) The former Takatoku toys belong to Bandai.
    3) The Alternators toys were produced under license from their respective car manufacturers. Since those licenses have expired, Hasbro and Takara would have to apply for new licenses if they wanted to release those toys again.
    4) The movie-related toys, at least the onscreen characters, are co-owned by Paramount/Dreamworks.
    5) And then there's Universe 1.0 Swerve (Chevy Aveo), which was presumably produced at the request of General Motors.
     

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