Fan Art: What's a good drawing program to use?

Discussion in 'Creative General Discussion' started by SPLIT LIP, Apr 3, 2011.

  1. SPLIT LIP

    SPLIT LIP Dry built

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2005
    Posts:
    66,409
    News Credits:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    407
    Location:
    agile house
    Likes:
    +915
    I don't know if this is the right place, but can anyone recommend a good digital drawing program? I'm looking into getting more serious with my art, but I don't know what's best.
     
  2. Fishdirt

    Fishdirt Tin Toy Transformer

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2010
    Posts:
    3,639
    News Credits:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    172
    Likes:
    +4
    Ebay:
    pencil and paper.

    Other then that the standards are alias sketchbook and photoshop for penciling and manga studio and illustrator for inking as well as a nice tablet. Mouse work is possible but for time constraints of deadlines it's slower then drawing by hand.
     
  3. Altitron

    Altitron Commercial Artist

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2007
    Posts:
    2,128
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Likes:
    +0
    Ebay:
    SketchBook is a great drawing program.

    - Alty
     
  4. SPLIT LIP

    SPLIT LIP Dry built

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2005
    Posts:
    66,409
    News Credits:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    407
    Location:
    agile house
    Likes:
    +915
    Hells yeah.

    But seriously, I'm looking to make my pictures look more... professional.
     
  5. Ramrider

    Ramrider TF Art Lad

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2004
    Posts:
    4,131
    Trophy Points:
    186
    Likes:
    +0
    Try GIMP out. It's free, and I find it more than suitable for my purposes.
     
  6. SPLIT LIP

    SPLIT LIP Dry built

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2005
    Posts:
    66,409
    News Credits:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    407
    Location:
    agile house
    Likes:
    +915
    Where's a reliable site to download from?

    I found gimp.org.
     
  7. Fishdirt

    Fishdirt Tin Toy Transformer

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2010
    Posts:
    3,639
    News Credits:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    172
    Likes:
    +4
    Ebay:
    What's your goals? Concept art? Then photoshop and painter. Comics art? Pencil, pens and photoshop for coloring.

    The bonus of having a physical piece in comic art is you can sell that for an additional income.

    I draw on paper and even color on it (though I digital color as well on big pieces). My friend drew "The Last Unicorn" for IDW on paper with pencil and her husband did the inking and coloring via photoshop on a modbook. The book was #2 on the bestseller for NY Times.

    My friend Ryan drew She-Hulk and x-23 by hand and sent scans to his inker who inked by hand. All Ryan did digitally was the rough layouts.

    My Gf does concept art and did schooling with Bobby Chiu who did the concept art for Alice in Wonderland. All that was done digitally. There is no use for physical art and the whole idea is to do realistic type paintings so digital is the way to go for that.

    As a pro I gotta say, don't knock the pencil and paper. A lot of us use them. Though you won't see me turn down a cintiq if it were given to me :D 

    Oh and gimp is good for fun stuff but the interface is different from PS. Personally I hated gimp but it's the best free one you can get.
     
  8. Ramrider

    Ramrider TF Art Lad

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2004
    Posts:
    4,131
    Trophy Points:
    186
    Likes:
    +0
    That'd be the place; that's the home site. Hit the download link at the top, and pick the Windows installer, assuming that's what you're on.
     
  9. LatinJEM777

    LatinJEM777 TFW's Premier Shredder

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2007
    Posts:
    462
    Trophy Points:
    81
    Likes:
    +0
    If you have a student e-mail, you can go to Autodesk's Student Community Website and download a 3-year (I think) academic license of Sketchbook Pro, and any other of Autodesk's Software.

    Or you can get a permanent license of Skethbook Pro for only $99, which is dirt cheap, considering what it does. I use it ALL THE TIME @ work sketching up concepts.
     
  10. Superquad7

    Superquad7 We're only human. Super Mod

    Joined:
    May 19, 2003
    Posts:
    47,598
    News Credits:
    11
    Trophy Points:
    342
    Likes:
    +23
    I'm gonna be the one who does the PR work for Adobe here. I'm certainly not knocking GIMP, especially as freeware, but I really think that if your goal is to be more "professional", then you're much better suited to go with the Adobe Suite route, notably Photoshop and Illustrator. Again, I'm not knocking GIMP or any other medium, as I'm certainly one who falls into the camp of "use whatever it takes to get your end result" as far as mediums go (and with illustration, that can even mean surfing through last week's trash for something!), but the Adobe Suite is nearly universal from the professional realm, as most places want artists to exhibit a high level of proficiency from the Adobe Suite.

    The good thing is that if you start out with GIMP, many of the skills you can learn are certainly transferable. The downside is that Adobe can be on the expensive side.

    Anyways, I hope my comments are helpful :) 
     

Share This Page