What is the reason for die-cast in toys?

Discussion in 'Transformers Toy Discussion' started by exomega255, Oct 31, 2011.

  1. exomega255

    exomega255 Emerald Green

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    Maybe someone can give me their perspective, but in many third party threads, it seems like the question of die-cast always appear. Be it "is there gonna be die-cast", or "how much die-cast", it always seems to be a question asked, especially on expensive products. It almost is a turn-off or a cost-justification thing as well.

    Personally, I only see die-cast advantage on a toy, being that

    1. Its heavier
    2. Its more costly...? (is that why people say if its expensive it better be die-cast?)

    I thought the disadvantage is that it sometimes make joints and posability an issue, but that's what I have read so far.

    Just wondering what your opinion on it is. How die-cast is benefiting to the engineering, maybe stability, of the toy? I wanted to know why people are always looking for it. Is a heavier toy more "Oomph"?
     
  2. megatroptimus

    megatroptimus Translatorminator

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    No idea why it's used, I just like it.
     
  3. Roanstalker

    Roanstalker Great Baan Gaan fan

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    I would only care aboutdiecast if it helps the structure of the toy. Otherwise I just see it as a nifty extra.
     
  4. Brooticus

    Brooticus "You bred Raptors?"

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    Darn good question, actually! I would imagine that it's purely for nostalgia reasons for some, but other than that I see no real advantage from an engineering or cost perspective.
     
  5. anotheran

    anotheran Old skooler

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    Heavier and harder feeling. For example, I love my binaltechs a lot more than my alternators for that reason alone. But I do worry about paint chipping all the time with my binaltechs
     
  6. megatroptimus

    megatroptimus Translatorminator

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    But why were toys from say, the 70s, made with tons of die-cast instead of plastic?
     
  7. IronicHide

    IronicHide MEME GO HERE

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    There are a lot of toy snobs out there, especially among us toy collectors of the age bracket that would have had G1 toys.

    My non-TF-collecting buddies have been a little bit dismissive about the all-plastic TFs these days and harp on, out of nostalgia or arrogance, that toys were made better back in the 1980s. Bear in mind, that the 'posability v brick' argument doesn't work for these guys.

    EDIT: To answer the post above, because oil was not refined to make plastic as available as it is now. Or, certainly, at least less so for toys.
     
  8. Soundwinder

    Soundwinder I wind sounds!

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    People often like the "heft" of a toy, but really I think die-cast should be avoided, especially painted die-cast.

    I actually like my KO Buzzsaw more than my legitimate Laserbeaks because the Buzzsaw's torso is made from gold plastic, rather than die-cast painted red like the Laserbeaks, thus prone to chipping. And the Binaltech line is the only time I bought a mold twice in the same deco, because Binaltech Battle Ravage was worthless to me because I was afraid to transform him since he had, you know, painted die-cast joints.

    G1 Soundwave and Rumble/Frenzy are perfect examples of good die-cast for me. They both use the die-cast in the feet and it's unpainted, so it actually adds to the stability of the figure (by weighing them down at the bottom) and, since they're unpainted, they can't get chipped.
     
  9. TigerBlade

    TigerBlade Prepare for extermination

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    I would say for the illusion of better quality. Most ppl associate weight with worth. They do 'feel' better to me tho. Holding MP Prime and then MP Megs......there is only one winner.....Prime will survive a large fall...Megs wouldn't even survive a transformation! It's the same with smaller figures....BT Red Alert in one hand....Alt Smokescreen in the other....the BT just feels better....more expensive...more likely to survive longer.

    Paint chipping isn't an issue with me. I never transform them unless they come in alt mode....display pieces only. Having said that I'd still prefer an entire collection of die-cast.
     
  10. Murasame

    Murasame CHIMICHANGAS

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    That it is heavier is an disadvantage to me. And the paint will flake when you hit it. I only like die-cast in models, Matchbox and Hotwheels cars.
     
  11. exomega255

    exomega255 Emerald Green

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    For me, heavier is a disadvantage too. I thought back then, they used Die-cast and it was acceptable because plastic quality and manufacturing technology back then wasn't nearly as great as it is now.

    I see tons of improvements in making better quality plastic over the years (as it is used in many things), so I dunno, I always wonder why heft = worth sometimes, too. But the perspectives everyone have been offering's been good so far =)
     
  12. tikgnat

    tikgnat Baweepgranaweepninnybong. TFW2005 Supporter

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    Because the extra mass makes it easier to knock out smaller kids and then steal their toys.
     
  13. Stepper

    Stepper Well-Known Member

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    Prefer toys to be diecast because more sturdier compare to plastic toys.
     
  14. anotheran

    anotheran Old skooler

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    I read an article a while ago about how plastic quality has increased but wouldn't be able to find that article. I did find this interesting article about metal withstanding more punishment: Die-cast - Transformers Wiki
     
  15. Roanstalker

    Roanstalker Great Baan Gaan fan

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    I find it odd that the Masterpiece Great Exkaiser has diecast, where the original DX didnt. I thought Diecast should only be used if the original toy also contains diecst.
     
  16. TigerBlade

    TigerBlade Prepare for extermination

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    Why would you think that? It'll be down to design and cost.
     
  17. megatroptimus

    megatroptimus Translatorminator

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    There are no rules when it comes to toy making. You do what you want depending on your design goals.
     
  18. Roanstalker

    Roanstalker Great Baan Gaan fan

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    I'd have prefered no diecast in this case. The chips are horrible in a combining robot.
     
  19. SPLIT LIP

    SPLIT LIP AKA Beve Stuscemi

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    Because toy design wasn't as refined as it is now back then. Die-cast is more expensive, dangerous, and stress-inducing on the toy's other components than plastics are.

    As time went on and toys became more complex and needed to endure more rough play, die-cast was discarded. Die-cast doesn't hold paint as well, and it's more dangerous since a child hit with a die-cast toy could be seriously hurt, but the same toy made of palstic would be less damaging. It's more expensive because you can't mould metal the way you can plastic, and even still metal moulds meant softer detail to avoid hard edges, wheras plastic can be moulded sharper without actually being sharp.

    There are. They're called safety laws. And physics.

    Die-cast is favoured because it gives weight to a toy, something seen as desirable by collectors. Because it's a more expensive process it drives up the value, again making it more a collector's item. Also because Die-cast must be painted it gives the toy a higher-quality look than plastics, which are often (but not always) slightly transparent in nature.
     
  20. TigerBlade

    TigerBlade Prepare for extermination

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    *cough* chinese bootlegs *cough*

    Also whatever one country has in regards to safety laws another may not. Take MP-01's smokestacks for example......or the fact MP Megs never made it out of asia officially.
     

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