Customs: Weird Question - How do you prepare your pallet for repaints?

Discussion in 'Creative General Discussion' started by sixpointsinspace, Jun 10, 2010.

  1. sixpointsinspace

    sixpointsinspace Well-Known Member

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    Hey, before I come off as a total tard ( I am a noob to using brushes and paints in general) let me preface this with "I get the basic concept" it's just the execution I am not clear on.

    So I purchased a set of round and shader brushes (eye of the tiger as recommended by Jin) and some various Testors Model Master Acryl colors. I have my plan all together for what I want to repaint. I know to wash the figure take apart at the joints etc.

    My question is, I have been told by numerous sources I want multiple thin layers rather than one big layer. Makes the finish smooth, no brush lines etc. I hear the way to do this is to water down the paint. Well I am guessing the intention is not to just dump water in the bottles with the paint. What should I do exactly and how much water should I add per rough amount of paint etc?

    Should you do this in the bottle cap? Should I use a paper plate? Should I get something else? I am kind of lost on how to get started.

    Also, there is bound to be idle time while im painting. How long is too long to leave the paint in open air before I should put the brush in water? I don't want to ruin my brushes. Your sage help would be greatly appreciated.
     
  2. CyberShadow

    CyberShadow Wheeljacks Lab

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    The best pallets to use are actually white bathroom tiles. They are relatively cheap (often free samples or from people changing their bathrooms) and are waterproof to stop the paint being absorbed.

    Paint is naturally too thick to apply directly. The idea is to thin it to the consistency that you like to work with. You can get specialist paint thiners, but for a beginners using acrylic paints, water is best. Start with a 50/50 mix of paint to water. Load up the brush and dump it on the pallet, then do the same with the water. It is often best to dump the water next to the paint, not on it, and blend the two together at the edge that they meet, so that you can add more paint until you get a consistency you like. Test it by brushing the mix across the tile. As a rule, thinner is better than too thick, as you can always add another coat.

    EDIT: Also, if you are mixing on the pallet, you can close the paint pot quickly. There is one rule about leaving paint pots open - never longer than you have to!
     
  3. sixpointsinspace

    sixpointsinspace Well-Known Member

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    Thanks CyberShadow :) 

    I will do a test run this evening and see what happens. So the general idea is to basically mix the paint with your brush until paints like you want? Interesting, I don't think I would have thought to do it that way.

    If anyone has tips as well don't be shy :) 
     
  4. thyvipera

    thyvipera ThyVipera

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    when i paint with acrylics, i use a paper plate. and i thin my brush with rubbing alcohol, and then dip the brush into the paint, and then brush some strokes on a paper towel, until there's a nice flow of just enough paint on the brush. not enough paint on the brush is better than too much.
     
  5. CyberShadow

    CyberShadow Wheeljacks Lab

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    No problem. Essentially, there is no right or wrong way to paint, and most of it is about personal preference. Getting the right consisency of paint for you is really trial and error to start with, but experience teaches you quickly. The only guide I can think of is that - if you are thinning white paint - you want something that looks like milk. That should prove a useful starting point. But, be careful as it depends on what paints you are using, what colour you are painting over (yellow over blue or any dark colour is very difficult) and what you are painting. To start with, your goal should be to get some nice flat colours applied neatly.

    More tips....

    Hold the brush at the tip, on the metal section, as you will have more control.

    Dont leave your brush standing in water, as the bristles will bend.

    Change your water regularly (especially after painting any metalic colours).

    Dont leave your water pot sitting next to your soda! (Trust me!)
     

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