Venomous Dinos, maybe Jurassic Park was on to something...

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Tyrannosaur, Mar 1, 2010.

  1. Tyrannosaur

    Tyrannosaur 100% Sarcastic Saurian

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    http://www.nytimes.com/2009/12/29/science/29obdino.html?_r=1

    The more I think about it, calling something that's old and outdated a "dinosaur" really is quite contradictory.

    It's not exactly like the Dilophosaurus in Jurassic Park, but now it seems that some dinosaurs (Or atleast one of them in this case) have glands in their mouths (Probably the salivary glands) that leak venom down the sides of their teeth and gums, similar to venomous lizards like the Gila Monster.

    So now venom is added to the arsenal of these killer chickens :lol 
    [​IMG]
     
  2. Sage o' G-fruit

    Sage o' G-fruit Critics gonna critique

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    Killer chickens.

    Huh.
     
  3. Ezilla82

    Ezilla82 Expect the Unexpected.

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    Interesting article. That is something new..venomous dinos. Huh I wonder if Jurassic Park 4 or beyond would even feature that. It would be cool, but my hopes for that aren't really high.
     
  4. thenatureboywoo

    thenatureboywoo Veteran

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    I'll keep this in mind if I'm walking down the street and I see one.
     
  5. Erector

    Erector I ruined the Hall of Fame

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    That's quite interesting actually. Not quite the spitter but a lot more like a modern day snake.
     
  6. Tyrannosaur

    Tyrannosaur 100% Sarcastic Saurian

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    It's quite an evolutionary advantage. What's strange to me is that even after all these years of evolution and as they evolve closer to birds they still retain some traits of their reptilian ancestors.
     
  7. darkmgmstr

    darkmgmstr Blue Lantern Corps Member

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    Hmmm... killer chickens... :p 
     
  8. Megatronwp38

    Megatronwp38 Megatron? Is that you!?!?

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    Very cool. I was always bummed that the Dilophosaurus was not really as portrayed in the movie.
     
  9. Tyrannosaur

    Tyrannosaur 100% Sarcastic Saurian

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    In the book they were about 2-3 times that size. Many fans think what Nedry encountered was a juvenile. Dilophosaurus is one of my favorite medium-sized therapods next to Ceratosaurus and Carnotaurus.
     
  10. Chaos Muffin

    Chaos Muffin Misadventure Veteran

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    Pretty cool. Wonder if they traveled in packs and what their prey was?
     
  11. Tyrannosaur

    Tyrannosaur 100% Sarcastic Saurian

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    Most likely did. They were pretty small even for dromaeosaurs. I'm guessing small mammals, reptiles, birds, species of inguanodont that lived in the area or other bipedal ornithischians and saurischians such as the ornithomimids if they had evolved at the time. Probably proto-ceratopsians too.

    Here's a good bit of info of the animal's environment.
    Paleobiota of the Yixian Formation - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


    What's funny is that there were no large carnivores around at the time. The largest was probably Raptorex and it's only about 3 meters in length.
     
  12. Erector

    Erector I ruined the Hall of Fame

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    How big was Sinornithosaurus? Can't find any references immediately. But from the pics I've managed to find, I think protoceratopians would've been too large prey for something like that. It looks almost compognathus in size, so sort of chicken / turkey size? Small mammals and birds / reptiles, almost definitely, but I couldn't see it taking on anything the size of a protoceratopian.

    Unless it worked in packs, of course, a bit like modern lions taking down elephants. But that's all conjecture.
     
  13. Tyrannosaur

    Tyrannosaur 100% Sarcastic Saurian

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    It's little more than a meter in length. All dromaeosaurs and even larger carnivores showed evidence of hunting in packs, so it's safe to assume it was a pack hunter.

    I've never heard of a pride of lions taking down an elephant. A couple of 500 pound animals couldn't possibly take down another animal 15 times that weight. Not to mention elephants have incredibly thick skin that's hard to penetrate. Even calfs are hard to kill.
     
  14. Optimus1986

    Optimus1986 TMNT & Hulk Fanatic

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    A feathery Compsognathus triassicus like in TLW? Neat.
     
  15. Coeloptera

    Coeloptera Big, bad beetle-bot

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    This is neat, if unsurprising, considering how very, very long venom has been in use among animals. I mean hell, cnidarians have been using it for hundreds of millions of years.

    I'd have been far more surprised if we didn't see this at some point. Now mind, some snakes are optimized for its use, some estimates place as many as 100 known lizard species in the category of some sort of venom use.

    - Coeloptera
     
  16. ILoveDinobot

    ILoveDinobot Arise Rodimus Prime

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    I was killed by chickens in one of the Zelda games.
     
  17. thenatureboywoo

    thenatureboywoo Veteran

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    The Zelda Nintendo game that was a gold cartridge was teh awesome. I played that game for like a month straight one summer. I smelled real bad at the end of the month.
     
  18. Bumblethumper

    Bumblethumper old misery guts

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    While this has received much press coverage, and is certainly an intriguing possibility, it's worth mentioning that the paper has been received with a lot of scepticism among scientists.

    The skull reconstruction highlights the supposedly venomous fangs, but some feel this is a misinterpretation and an exaggeration.

    [​IMG]

    The actual skull is loosely disarticulated, and the teeth appear to have slipped out of their sockets.

    [​IMG]

    It was also noted that from a functional perspective, elongated venom-delivering teeth would make more sense at the front of the mouth, as in snakes.
     
  19. Tyrannosaur

    Tyrannosaur 100% Sarcastic Saurian

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    Wait, were they venomous teeth or venom glands inside the mouth of the animal that seeped venom down the gums of the mouth like a Gila Monster?
     
  20. Bumblethumper

    Bumblethumper old misery guts

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    That's totally within the realm of possibility, but the burden of proof isn't yet sufficient to conclude that Sinornithosaurus was a poisonous dinosaur.

    It's entirely possible that there were poisonous dinosaurs. The tooth groove feature that the authors single out, is actually present in the teeth of many theropod dinosaurs.
     

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