Titanic Anniversary tonight.

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by WWMEGATRON, Apr 14, 2010.

  1. WWMEGATRON

    WWMEGATRON Well-Known Member

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    From 11:40 PM to 2:20 AM tonight, marks 98 years Titanic went to the bottom, killing 1500+ men women & children because there were only 20 lifeboats for 1200 out of the 2200 in the ship. Only 705 survived cause many passengers didn't thought Titanic was in danger & 3rd class passengers were held at bay during the evacuation of 1rst & 2nd class passengers. More 1rst class men survived than 3rd class children. Today the wreck is dissolving away, taking the memories of those that died & survived.

    This anniversary is special, cause the last survivor, Millvina Dean, died on May 31 2009(98 years Titanic was launch from Belfast Northern Ireland)

    One would had to wonder: what would had I done in the last 2hrs & 40 minutes of Titanic's life?? Should had a person died in my place??

    Titanic was the 2nd ship of the Olympic Class Liners. She had 2 sister ships, Olympic & Britannic.

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    Some of the Victims & Survivors:

    The Line of Titanic's Command.
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    http://www.titanic-titanic.com/titanic_officers.shtml
    Captain Smith died, Chief Officer Wilde died, 1rst Officer Murdoch died, 2nd Officer Lightoller survived, 3rd Officer Pitman survived, 4rth Off. Boxhall survived, 5th Off. Lowe survived, 6th Off. Moody died(he was 25) & the Chief Purser McElroy died.

    Radio Officer Jack Phillips
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    John George "Jack" Phillips (11 April 1887–15 April 1912).

    In March 1912 Phillips was appointed a senior wireless operator on board the RMS Titanic for its maiden voyage. During the voyage Phillips and his collegue Bride sent out passengers' personal messages and received iceberg warnings and other navigational information from other ships. Phillips celebrated his 25th birthday on the day after the voyage began.

    On the evening of 14 April, in the wireless room on the boat deck, Phillips was sending messages to Newfoundland, working to clear a backlog of passengers' personal messages. After 11:00 pm, Phillips was interrupted by the wireless operator of SS Californian reporting that they were stopped, surrounded by ice. The Californian was very close and the signal was strong and loud in Phillips' ears. Phillips quickly sent back, "Shut up, shut up, I am busy working!" and continued communicating with Newfoundland. The Californian then switched off the radio.

    The Titanic struck an iceberg at 11:40 pm that night and began sinking. Bride had woken up and began getting ready to relieve Phillips when Captain Edward Smith came into the wireless room and told Phillips to prepare to send out a distress signal. Shortly after midnight, Captain Smith came in again and told them to send out the call for assistance and gave them Titanic's estimated position. Phillips began sending out the distress signal, code CQD, while Bride took messages to Captain Smith about which ships were coming to Titanic's assistance.

    After taking a quick break, Phillips returned to the wireless room, reporting to Bride that the forward part of the ship was flooded and that they should put on more clothes and lifebelts. Bride began to get ready while Phillips went back to work on the wireless machine. The wireless power was almost completely out shortly after 2:00 am when Captain Smith arrived and told the men that they had done their duty and that they were relieved. Bride later remembered being moved by the way Phillips continued working. While their backs were turned, a crew member sneaked in and attempted to steal Phillips' lifebelt. Bride saw and grabbed the man as Phillips stood up and knocked the crew member out. The water was beginning to flood the boat deck as they both ran out of the wireless room, leaving the unconscious crewman where he fell. The men then split up, Bride heading forward and Phillips heading aft.

    Phillips managed to make it to the overturned lifeboat B, the same lifeboat that Bride was on, but he died before rescue came.

    The Goodwing Family, They all died in the sinking
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    Michel Marcel Navratil (June 12, 1908 – January 30, 2001), was one of the last survivors of the sinking of the RMS Titanic on April 15, 1912. Michel, along with his brother, Edmond Navratil (1910-1953), were known as the Titanic Orphans, having been the only children rescued without a parent or guardian. He was the last male survivor of the Titanic. French-speaking first-class passenger Margaret Hays cared for the boys at her home until their mother could be located, which occurred as a result of newspaper articles including their pictures. Marcelle sailed to New York City, New York and was reunited with her sons on May 16, 1912. She took her children back to France aboard the RMS Oceanic. -wikipedia.org

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    Miss Ruth Elizabeth Becker (1899-1990), who survived the sinking of the Titanic.

    Twelve year old Ruth boarded the Titanic along with her mother and siblings as second-class passengers on April 10, 1912 at Southampton, England. Shortly after the ship's collision with the iceberg at 11:40 p.m. on April 14th, Ruth recalled that a steward told her mother, "We've had a little accident. They're going to fix it, and then we'll be on our way." Realizing that the ship was seriously damaged, Nellie took her children up to the boat deck.

    A steward helped load Marion and Richard into Lifeboat No. 11, but would not let Nellie in. It was only after pleading with the steward that he finally consented, but Ruth was not allowed in. Her Mother then screamed to Ruth telling her to get in another lifeboat. Ruth later got tossed into Lifeboat No. 13 by Sixth Officer James Moody.

    Nellie and her three children were all picked up by the rescue ship RMS Carpathia. Although it was a struggle to find her mother on the ship Ruth finally managed to. They arrived in New York City on April 18th.


    Millvina Dean(the last & youngest survivor)
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    LONDON — Millvina Dean, who as a baby was wrapped in a sack and lowered into a lifeboat in the frigid North Atlantic, has died, having been the last survivor of 1912 sinking of the RMS Titanic.

    She was 97 years old, and she died where she had lived — in Southampton, England, the city her family had tried to leave behind when it took the ship's ill-fated maiden voyage, bound for America.

    She died in her sleep early Sunday, her friend Gunter Babler told the Associated Press. It was the 98th anniversary of the launch of the ship that was billed as "practically unsinkable."

    Babler said Dean's longtime companion, Bruno Nordmanis, called him in Switzerland to say staff at Woodlands Ridge Nursing Home in Southampton discovered Dean in her room Sunday morning. He said she had been hospitalized with pneumonia last week but she had recovered and returned to the home.

    A staff nurse at the nursing home said late Sunday that no one would comment until administrators came on duty Monday morning.

    Dean just over 2 months old when the Titanic hit an iceberg on the night of April 14, 1912. The ship sank in less than three hours.

    Dean was one of 706 people — mostly women and children — who survived. Her father was among the 1,517 who died.

    Babler, who is head of the Switzerland Titanic Society, said Dean was a "very good friend of very many years."

    "I met her through the Titanic society but she became a friend and I went to see very every month or so," he said.

    The pride of the White Star line, the Titanic had a mahogany-paneled smoking room, a swimming pool and a squash court. But it did not have enough lifeboats for all of its 2,200 passengers and crew.

    Dean's family were steerage passengers setting out from the English port of Southampton for a new life in the United States. Her father had sold his pub and hoped to open a tobacconists' shop in Kansas City, Missouri, where his wife had relatives.

    Initially scheduled to travel on another ship, the family was transferred to the Titanic because of a coal strike. Four days out of port and about 600 kilometers (380 miles) southeast of Newfoundland, the ship hit an iceberg. The impact buckled the Titanic's hull and sent sea water pouring into six of its supposedly watertight compartments.

    Dean said her father's quick actions saved his family. He felt the ship scrape the iceberg and hustled the family out of its third-class quarters and toward the lifeboat that would take them to safety. "That's partly what saved us — because he was so quick. Some people thought the ship was unsinkable," Dean told the British Broadcasting Corp. in 1998.

    Wrapped in a sack against the Atlantic chill, Dean was lowered into a lifeboat. Her 2-year-old brother Bertram and her mother Georgette also survived.


    "She said goodbye to my father and he said he'd be along later," Dean said in 2002. "I was put into lifeboat 13. It was a bitterly cold night and eventually we were picked up by the Carpathia."

    The family was taken to New York, then returned to England with other survivors aboard the rescue ship Adriatic. Dean did not know she had been aboard the Titanic until she was 8 years old, when her mother, about to remarry, told her about her father's death. Her mother, always reticent about the tragedy, died in 1975 at age 95.

    Born in London on Feb. 2, 1912, Elizabeth Gladys "Millvina" Dean spent most of her life in the English seaside town of Southampton, Titanic's home port. She never married, and worked as a secretary, retiring in 1972 from an engineering firm.

    She moved into a nursing home after breaking her hip about three years ago. She had to sell several Titanic mementoes to raise funds, prompting her friends to set up a fund to subsidize her nursing home fees. Leonardo DiCaprio and Kate Winslet, the stars of the film "Titanic," pledged their support to the fund last month.

    For most of her life Dean had no contact with Titanic enthusiasts and rarely spoke about the disaster. Dean said she had seen the 1958 film "A Night to Remember" with other survivors, but found it so upsetting that she declined to watch any other attempts to put the disaster on celluloid, including the 1997 blockbuster "Titanic."

    She began to take part in Titanic-related activities in the 1980s, after the discovery of the ship's wreck in 1985 sparked renewed interest in the disaster. At a memorial service in England, Dean met a group of American Titanic enthusiasts who invited her to a meeting in the U.S.

    She visited Belfast to see where the ship was built, attended Titanic conventions around the world — where she was mobbed by autograph seekers — and participated in radio and television documentaries about the sinking.

    Charles Haas, president of the New-Jersey based Titanic International Society, said Dean was happy to talk to children about the Titanic. "She had a soft spot for children," he said. "I remember watching was little tiny children came over clutching pieces of paper for her to sign. She was very good with them, very warm."

    In 1997, Dean crossed the Atlantic by boat for the first time, on the QEII luxury liner, and finally visited Kansas City, declaring it "so lovely I could stay here five years." She was active well into her 90s, but missed the commemoration of the 95th anniversary of the disaster in 2007 after breaking her hip.

    Dean had no memories of the sinking and said she preferred it that way. "I wouldn't want to remember, really," she told The Associated Press in 1997. She opposed attempts to raise the wreck 4,000 meters (13,000 feet) from the sea bed.

    "I don't want them to raise it, I think the other survivors would say exactly the same," she said in 1997. "That would be horrible."

    The last survivor with memories of the sinking — and the last American survivor — was Lillian Asplund, who was 5 at the time. She died in May 2006 at the age of 99. The second-last survivor, Barbara Joyce West Dainton of Truro, England, died in October 2007 aged 96.

    Alma Paulson
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    Mrs Nils Pålsson (Alma Cornelia Berglund), 29, was born on August 3, 1882 in Velinge, Sweden the daughter of Maria Berglund (neé Nilsson) and Anders Berglund (1). Alma had four brothers: Oskar Albert, Hilding Waldemar, Axel Ferdinand and Gustav Gabriel Berglund (2).

    Alma was married to Nils Pålsson (3) who worked as a miner in Gruvan, Bjuv, Skåne, Sweden. Following a major strike Nils tired of mining and because the only professions available in Bjuv were miner, brickworker and farm hand he decided to emigrate. On 10 June 1910 he received his emigration certificate and travelled to Chicago. Having gained employment as a tram conductor Nils set about saving enough money for his family to join him. He lived at 938 Townsend Street, Chicago. Also living in Chicago were two of Alma's brothers: Olof (?Oskar) Berglund on 2304 North Spring St. and Axel Berglund, 1725 Kimball Ave.

    Eventually enough money had been raised and Alma and her four children Torburg, Paul, Stina, and Gösta left Gruvan for Southampton, travelling via Malmö and Copenhagen.

    On board the Titanic Alma got to know August Wennerström. When the ship was sinking it took a long time to prepare the four children and Alma came too late for the lifeboats. She met Wennerström on the Boat Deck near collapsible A. Wennerström tried to hold on to two of the children as she had asked him to but when water came up them Wennerström lost his grip and both disappeared.

    Mrs Pålsson and the children boarded the Titanic at Southampton. They all perished in the sinking. Nils clung to the hope that stories about a rescued boy might refer to one of his children. He spent much money and time looking in vain for the boy but eventually Mr Pålsson was informed at the Chicago offices of the White Star line that his family was among the missing.

    Benjamin Hart, Eva Hart, Mrs Esther Ada Hart
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    Mr Benjamin Hart, 43, from Ilford, Essex, England was travelling to Winnipeg, MB, Canada with his wife Esther Hart (45) and their daughter Eva Miriam Hart (7).

    Esther and Eva were rescued in lifeboat 14 but Benjamin died in the disaster.

    Mrs Benjamin Hart (Esther Ada Bloomfield), 45, from Ilford, Essex, England was travelling to Winnipeg, MB, Canada with her husband Benjamin Hart (43) and their daughter Eva Miriam (7).

    Esther and Eva were rescued in lifeboat 14 but Benjamin died in the disaster.

    Esther died in 1928

    Eva Hart
    Eva Miriam Hart was born on January 31, 1905 in Ilford, London, England to Benjamin Hart and Esther Bloomfield. In early 1912, Benjamin decided to take his family and immigrate to Winnipeg, Manitoba, where he planned to open a drug store.

    Eva was seven years old when she and her parents boarded the RMS Titanic as second-class passengers on April 10, 1912 at Southampton, England.

    We went on the day on the boat train... I was 7, I had never seen a ship before... it looked very big...everybody was very excited, we went down to the cabin and that's when my mother said to my father that she had made up her mind quite firmly that she would not go to bed in that ship, she would sit up at night... she decided that she wouldn't go to bed at night, and she didn't!

    Throughout the voyage Eva's mother was troubled by a fear that some kind of catastrophe would hit thew ship. To call a ship unsinkable was, in her mind, flying in the face of God.

    "My father was so excited about it and my mother was so upset... The first time in my life I saw her crying... she was so desperately unhappy about the prospect of going, she had this premonition, a most unusual thing for her...

    Eva was sleeping when the Titanic struck the iceberg. Eva's father rushed into her cabin to alert his wife and daughter, and after wrapping Eva in a blanket, carried her to the boat's deck. He placed his wife and daughter in Lifeboat No. 14 and told Eva to 'hold mummy's hand and be a good girl.' It was the last time she would ever see her father. Eva's father perished and his body, if recovered, was never identified.

    Eva and her mother were rescued up by the RMS Carpathia and arrived in New York City on April 18th. Soon after arriving in New York, Eva and her mother returned to England and her mother remarried. Eva was plagued with nightmares and upon the death of her mother when Eva was 23, Eva confronted her fears head on by returning to the sea and locking herself in a cabin for four straight days until the nightmares went away. "I saw that ship sink," she said in a 1993 interview. "I never closed my eyes. I didn't sleep at all. I saw it, I heard it, and nobody could possibly forget it." "I can remember the colors, the sounds, everything," she said. "The worst thing I can remember are the screams." And then the silence that followed. "It seemed as if once everybody had gone, drowned, finished, the whole world was standing still. There was nothing, just this deathly, terrible silence in the dark night with the stars overhead."

    Eva was one of the most outspoken survivors concerning the Titanic's lack of sufficient lifeboats and of any salvage attempts of the Titanic after its discovery in 1985. She commonly criticised the White Star Line for failing to provide enough lifeboats for all aboard Titanic. "If a ship is torpedoed, that's war," she once said. "If it strikes a rock in a storm, that's nature. But just to die because there weren't enough lifeboats, that's ridiculous." When salvaging efforts began in 1987, Eva was quick to note that the Titanic was a grave site and should be treated as such. She often decried the "insensitivity and greed" and labeled the salvers "fortune hunters, vultures, pirates, and grave robbers."

    Eva maintained very active in Titanic-related activities well into her 80s. In 1982, Eva returned to the United States and joined several other survivors at a Titanic Historical Society convention commemorating the 70th anniversary of Titanic's sinking. She participated in three more conventions in 1987, 1988, and in 1992. In 1994, Eva wrote an autobiography, 'Shadow of the Titanic - A Survivor's Story', in which she described her experiences aboard the ship and the lasting implications of its sinking. On April 15, 1995, the 83rd anniversary of the disaster, Eva and fellow second-class Titanic survivor Edith Brown Haisman, dedicated a memorial garden plaque on the grounds of the National Maritime Museum in London.

    Eva died on February 14, 1996 at her home in Chadwell Heath at the age of 91. A Wetherspoon's Pub in Chadwell Heath is fittingly named 'The Eva Hart'
     
  2. jazz4ever

    jazz4ever I'm turned on by numbers

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    Such a tragedy, Can You imagine something like that happening in todays world?
     
  3. Ops_was_a_truck

    Ops_was_a_truck JOOOLIE ANDREWWWWWS!!!!!!

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    Not to put too fine a point on it, but 9/11 is pretty similar, albiet not a natural tragedy.
     
  4. Aernaroth

    Aernaroth <b><font color=blue>I voted for Super_Megatron and Veteran

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    A thousand deaths resulting from arrogance in design and policy are hardly a natural tragedy.
     
  5. Ops_was_a_truck

    Ops_was_a_truck JOOOLIE ANDREWWWWWS!!!!!!

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    Poor choice of words on my part. No, you're right, it wasn't a natural tragedy - poor attentiveness by the Titanic crew & poor design lead to multiple deaths of innocents. I guess what I meant was that the gist of the tragedy was similarly shocking and surprising to Sept. 11th.
     
  6. Lock Cade

    Lock Cade Tarn Fangirl TFW2005 Supporter

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    A very tragic story, one which should have never happened had the crew heeded the ice warnings among other factors that have led to the disaster.

    Such a shame that the wreck is dissolving away. But we should be fortunate that we still have videos made from the various exploration dives to the wreck and such, so the story of the Titanic will never truly die... at least, not until the end of the Earth itself.


    I remember my dad saying that there was family friend of my great-great-great grandmother's who was on the Titanic when it sank, and it's presumed that he went down with the ship; don't think they ever recovered his body. His name was John Lingane, and there is a road just outside of my hometown that is named after him, since he had lived on a farm on the same road. However, I've read a couple of books on the Titanic that features the list of all the passengers, and I could never find his name on the list. :( 
     
  7. grimlock1972

    grimlock1972 "No Mas" My Wallet

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    YouTube - Titanic Soundtrack - Nearer my God to Thee

    originally the plans for the Titanic called for sufficient lifeboats for all but that amount was stricken down to the minimum required by law at the time as the owners felt it cluttered up the deck too much for the high paying 1st and 2nd class passengers.

    The opnly good to come out of it is several new maritime laws that have thus far prevented another such horrendous loss of life in a civilian ship sinking.

    the above you tube video is Nearer my god to thee, it is believe what the Titanic's band played as the ship was sinking
     
  8. thenatureboywoo

    thenatureboywoo Veteran

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    This was my shit when I was younger. The only model I ever made when I was a kid was the Titanic. I remember watching the TV special back in the eighties when they found this thing. I think the friggin' movie ruined this topic for me forever now.
     
  9. Nachtsider

    Nachtsider Banned

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    I'm going to re-enact the sinking with my bathtub, a big lump of ice, a toy boat and a bunch of ants.
     
  10. Megatronwp38

    Megatronwp38 Megatron? Is that you!?!?

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    I have a toy Titanic that floats, but it is also made to sink and when it does it actually breaks in two. It's a neat little thing, it came with a book as well.
     
  11. ErechOveraker

    ErechOveraker I'm with Plowking.

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    I've written several fan-fictions reenacting the night the mighty ship struck the iceberg, only instead it was struck by Decepticon recon agents crash landing on Earth. Someday I hope to have them published online.
     
  12. Matty

    Matty @StayingInTheBox Moderator News Staff

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    It's shocking to try and imagine what it'd feel like being there on that night. I went to visit the Queen Mary in Long Beach and although I believe the Queen Mary is much bigger than the Titanic, trying to imagine something of that size sinking in the middle of an ocean is just intimidating and scary.
     
  13. Dran0n

    Dran0n Junk male

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    Wow. 98 years. Damn.

    I think I'll watch Titanic sometime soon.

    By the way, Titanic > Avatar
     
  14. moreprimeland

    moreprimeland Optimus told me to do it! Moderator TFW2005 Supporter

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    I know--Alex...movies directed by James Cameron?? :D 

    Just kidding..but on a more serious note.. the Discovery channel has a really good "what really happened" kind of episodes that were great to watch. Can't remember if they were on reg. Disc. channel or DiscoveryScience, but they have some updates with newer footage about what was found in the wreckage.
     
  15. Chaos Muffin

    Chaos Muffin Misadventure Veteran

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    Cameron kinda ruined it for me. Everytime I hear the 'T' word I think of Leo Decaprio drowning. :lol 

    I would say that's a good thing, but the kid actually turned out to be a good actor.
     
  16. Spoiler

    Spoiler Autobot Spoiler

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    I recall watching a Disc channel special about Titanic. They had mentioned, had they struck the iceburg head on, instead of trying to steer around it, they would have probably made it.

    I was always fascinated with Titanic, I used to read books about it back in school, before the movie even came out.
     
  17. Brawlastator

    Brawlastator it is our life - jon bovi

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    Every time I hear "Titanic," I think of Cameron pilfering his own "I see you." line and making a movie about it.
     
  18. Mr. Sparklebot

    Mr. Sparklebot 'Til All Are Juan

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    As long as no one plays any Celine Dion...

    But wow, soon to be a century since such a tragedy occured.
     
  19. moreprimeland

    moreprimeland Optimus told me to do it! Moderator TFW2005 Supporter

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    Not a big fan of his either.. but you're right, he did turn out to be a fine actor.
     
  20. Lock Cade

    Lock Cade Tarn Fangirl TFW2005 Supporter

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    Leonardo DiCaprio isn't too bad of an actor, if I say so myself.

    Really, if they had hit the iceberg head on they probably would have made it? Interesting...

    I got interested in Titanic after James Cameron made the movie. :confused2 
     

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