Tim Burton's "Superman Lives" costume

Discussion in 'Movies and Television' started by Mr. Sinister, Oct 29, 2010.

  1. Mr. Sinister

    Mr. Sinister Cat + Sinister = TROUBLE

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  2. Opticron Primal

    Opticron Primal Comin' up OOOs!

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    I love Burton, but was he intending to do a Superman film or a Steel film? From the looks of that costume, you'd think the latter.
     
  3. Mr. Sinister

    Mr. Sinister Cat + Sinister = TROUBLE

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    To be honest, I have a feeling it's the "regeneration suit" he wears after he "dies" fighting Doomsday.
     
  4. Omnius

    Omnius Well-Known Member

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    And I'm sure he would have still found a way to work Johnny Depp in. I'm glad we were spared this.
     
  5. kenm2474

    kenm2474 LORD DC TFW2005 Supporter

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    Yeah...It looks like the Regeneration Suit. If not then this is total fail and why it never made it.
     
  6. rattrap007

    rattrap007 Insert witty comment here TFW2005 Supporter

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    I'd rather see Superman fight the Thanagarian Snare beast
     
  7. Smasher

    Smasher HUNKY BEATS

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    Actually, I think it looks kinda cool -but not as Superman's outfit.
     
  8. j.a.f.o.

    j.a.f.o. Just Looking, Not Buying

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    His take on Batman worked. Judging by this "suit" I don't get how he could've been so off-base on Superman.
     
  9. kenm2474

    kenm2474 LORD DC TFW2005 Supporter

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    The S shield is an Icon. The one on the costume is too different to my liking and probably WB as well..
     
  10. 009*

    009* That Guy In Nebraska

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    That costume seems more "Energy Supes" than anything else to me.
     
  11. Paladin

    Paladin Have Zord, Will Travel

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    I guarantee I would've liked this film more than "Superman Returns."
     
  12. Bumblethumper

    Bumblethumper old misery guts

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    Absolutely.

    While I thought the old Nic Cage polaroid looked pretty dodgy, this seems genuinely innovative. I think it would've looked quite striking on screen.

    While Burton and Superman seem like a total mis-match, I think Superman is one of the toughest superheroes to get right. It really hasn't worked since 1978. He can come off a bit of a bland boyscout, and the powers are so unlimited that it's difficult to relate. It might've been just the thing to come at it from a radically different angle.

    At any rate Superman is such a well known and iconic figure, that even if they'd fucked it up horribly, the character would still endure.

    Funny enough I didn't even notice till you pointed it out. I don't really think it's all that different, especially when you consider the various Batman emblems they've had over the years. Since the 'S' has always been a kryptonian symbol rather than an actual 'S', it could be argued that there's scope for making it a little more alien looking. But what they've done here doesn't really disappoint or impress me either way.
     
  13. jorod74

    jorod74 Psycholagnist (Ret.)

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    Schumacher- Batsuit Superman??

    oh, lord, no.

    this is as bad as the recent Superman-turned-Twilight-Wannabe- run that DC just started.

    I give props to Superman Returns for trying to continue the franchise right where Donner left off, but the movie fell apart in every other way.
    i am just glad Burton didn't get his hands on Supes, based upon these images.
     
  14. Greyryder

    Greyryder Kitbashed

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    Taken on its own, it actually looks pretty cool. It's just not Superman. It'd be fine as a specialty suit, but not as the main one.
     
  15. Tekkaman Blade

    Tekkaman Blade Professor of Animation

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    With this awful plot??


    So what was Burton's vision? Not much different from Peters', in fact. Burton hated the flying FX in the 1978 film, too, so he didn't want Superman to fly. Instead, he put Superman in a Supermobile. (Seven years later, AICN revealed that Burton and Peters had also planned on having Superman teleport from place to place in lieu of flying.) He also hated the classic costume, too, hence the oddball designs he proffered in its place, all of which would have featured silver-relief versions of the ElectroSupes S-shield and armored, treaded boots similar in design to what Michael Keaton wore as Batman:

    1. A partially translucent suit that would allow full view of Superman's internal organs, as reported by Cinescape in late 1997 as Burton's plans for the film kicked into high gear. (Although word from within the Burton camp confirmed that Burton was indeed hoping to do this, the design was apparently never committed to paper'leaving some people following the project wondering if Burton was really going to use the translucent suit or if it was just a hoax. Nevertheless, Burton's diehard fans adored the idea, praising it as total genius and the height of coolness. Superman fans, on the other hand, were left scratching their heads over it.)
    2. An all-black, alien-looking suit that would have resembled a "cool cross" between Edward Scissorhands, the WB movie Batman, and a Borg. (At one point, this was what Burton's Superman would have started the film off in.)
    3. A metallic silver healing suit/body armor with details that would have made Superman's body look robotic. (An action figure prototype of Nic Cage as Superman wearing body armor was made, but it looked nothing like the design as described and featured the usual red/blue/gold Superman color scheme.)
    4. An all-dark blue suit with a "blood-red" cape. (This would have been the standard Superman suit used in subsequent films.)

    (I should probably mention that the last three of these designs were reported by Superman CINEMA and the Superman Homepage.)

    As if that wasn't enough, Burton was also opposed to the casting of Cage, who's a diehard comic book geek and was protesting Burton's planned changes. Even though he put on a public face of being delighted with the casting of Cage, Burton was privately trying to get Cage fired and replaced with Ralph Fiennes, and he kept trying to do so all the while he was on the film. Hulk Hogan was then approached to play Doomsday, and he immediately agreed (this was reported on the WCW/NWO site at that time by NWO spokesperson Jeff Katz). However, Burton envisioned Doomsday as being "kinda chunky" and told Hogan to gain weight for the part. Hogan blew a fuse and turned Burton down flat, so Burton had Doomsday redesigned to look like a cybernetically-enhanced Rancor (the design was shown at Fabio2's now-defunct Superheroes at the Movies site and at former Superman comic book artist Kerry Gammill's web site'he was one of the film's conceptual designers) and dropped the idea of casting Hogan. Jim Carrey was briefly considered to play Brainiac'envisioned by Burton in a variety of weird forms, one of them an Independence Day rip-off (the design of which was also shown on Fabio2's Superheroes At The Movies site) and another a green head in a glass ball balanced on a black pyramid'but Burton made a handshake deal with Tim Allen to give him the role. (Allen said to the Chicago Sun-Times, "I'll shave my head in a second!") Burton also made a handshake deal with Chris Rock to cast him as Jimmy Olsen, who Burton envisioned as a smart-@$$ street-punk type. (Burton had wanted to cast Marlon Wayans as Robin in Batman Returns, but WB wouldn't let him.) In a related story, Comics2Film reported that Jack Larson, who played Jimmy on the George Reeves Superman TV show in the 1950s, expressed interest in playing Perry White because he was a huge fan of Rock, but nothing came of it. Then Burton made similar handshake arrangements with Kevin Spacey (who had previously been rumored to voice Brainiac at one point) and Cameron Diaz to cast them as Luthor and Lois, respectively. AICN reported that Barry Corbin (Northern Exposure) offered to play Perry White, but no official casting for the role was ever made public. He also intended to shoot the Metropolis exteriors in Pittsburgh, making use of the Gothic buildings there.

    Meanwhile, Jon Peters saw a group of Shaolin monks performing on Jay Leno, and liked them so much that he tried to get them cast in the film. He also tried to have the Eradicator'now renamed "K" by Burton (to be voiced by Jack Nicholson, who had been previously rumored to play Luthor) and reinvented as a shapeshifting robotic Alfred to Superman's gadget-dependent Batman (swear to God, I'm not kidding; Burton and Peters' Superman was to be reliant on Batman-esque Kryptonian gadgets and technology, as reported by Superman CINEMA and Superman-V.com)'tote around an "Eradicator Stick," because he saw visions of posters and toys based on it. And the Eradicator wasn't the only computerized character to be radically reconceived; Burton planned to end the film with Luthor and Brainiac amalgamating to become a single villain called either "Luthinac" or "Lexiac". (The concept art by Pete Von Scholly, shown at the Superman V.com site, depicted "Lexiac" as a gigantic slug-like creature with Luthor's face.) But the most controversial thing Burton did was brag to a radio news service in Texas during an interview that he intended to play up "Superman's darker, more murderous side" and that he hoped Cage was up to the task of portraying that aspect of Superman. Also, Michael Keaton announced to MTV that he was going to be in the film (he and Burton are pals'he only did the Batman films as a favor to Burton; he actually hated playing the role and said so to E! when Jack Frost was released), but when asked if he was going to play Batman, he said, "Not exactly." In fact, Burton had cut Kevin Smith's hoped-for Batman cameo out of the film, so nobody has any clue who Keaton was to play.

    [Before I go any further, I should probably explain why Burton and Peters' Superman was going to be gadget-dependent. A scoop from Ain't It Cool News in November of 1997'believe it or not, I actually printed some of this stuff out and saved it when it first broke'discussed Burton's plans thusly: "Burton's master plan is to reinvent the Superman franchise with this film. Tim is aiming to change the current comics' idea of Superman by blending his style with some of the earlier ideas in the Superman comics. Meanwhile, some Superman elements he's completely getting rid of. Now, I'm not privy to those changes yet, but I am told he will be getting a ton of flak for doing so'." Superman CINEMA confirmed this, saying that Burton's plan was to shave Superman down to his 1938 power levels. Which explains the Supermobile and gadgets, I suppose.]

    Anyway, the Strick script'which Burton adored'was rejected by WB. (In fact, low-level WB execs'then-WB head honchos Bob Daly and Terry Semel were in total support of Burton-Peters'were calling up Kevin Smith and complaining about how Burton and Peters were screwing up the project.) So Burton hired Akiva Goldsman'one of the writers initially considered to replace Kevin Smith'to rewrite Strick's script. Goldsman's rewrite was rejected. Then Burton hired Ron Bass to rewrite Goldsman's rewrite of Strick's script. Bass's rewrite was rejected. Then Burton hired Dan Gilroy to rewrite Bass' rewrite of Goldsman's rewrite of Strick's script. For the moment, WB was appeased. Meanwhile, Burton kept changing his mind about the film's design scheme, and was constantly ordering the art teams to change whatever it was they were doing every day and telling them they weren't doing things the way he wanted. Cinefex Magazine ran an article about Burton's slave-driving the art team, and concept designer Sylvain Despretz went on record as saying that the designs Burton and Peters wanted had little or nothing to do with either the comic books or with the traditional Superman image.

    [However, Despretz thinks that movies based on comic books are what's dumbing down cinema'he doesn't believe comics deserve to be translated to film'and he said flat-out that the fans' complaints about Burton's attempted changes to Superman were petty and unimportant. "It's just a movie, everything they were complaining about was inconsequential," he claimed. So really, he and Burton-Peters were on the same page the whole time. Ditto for his fellow concept artist Rolf Mohr, who shared his lack of respect for the Superman character and stated that he went out of his way to avoid being influenced by the comics. Concept artist James Carson was even more anti-fan, asserting that if the fans don't like WB's intended radical changes to Superman, they should pony up the money and make their own Superman movie. Toy designers for Hasbro who were working on the film also complained about the fans, asserting that they should just get over the changes and accept them. Another designer, Brian Lawrence, justified the changes by saying that it was best to think of Burton's Superman as a completely new character who just happened to share the same name as Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster's creation. The only member of the art team who had any respect for the material and the fans was the aforementioned Pete Von Scholly, who openly stated that Burton and Peters were going about the project the wrong way and that it should have been turned over to fans of the comics from the start. He still feels that way, especially in light of the recent developments on the film.]

    Nicolas Cage, having been fighting tooth and nail against Burton and Peters' vision of Superman (even though he'd been putting on a happy public face about working with them), angrily demanded that he be allowed to wear the classic Superman costume and fly. So WB relented much to Burton's dismay, ordering up a rubber Superman suit and flying FX tests. (According to Superman CINEMA, a chintzy, Sam Jones-as-Flash Gordon-type Superman suit was dished up as well, but it went over like a lead balloon.) However, when Cage tried on the rubber suit, it looked stupid. And when they stuck a long-haired wig on him, it looked even worse. And after Burton and Gilroy were finished with their rewritten script, WB looked it over and loathed it. Even worse, all of Burton and Peters' screwing around and causing trouble resulted in the film being budgeted somewhere between $140-190 million. So, in April 1998, just weeks before the film was to start shooting, WB put the film on indefinite hold. By this time, about $30-40 million (including the pay-or-play contracts for Burton and Cage'$20 million for Cage, $5 million for Burton) had already been spent on the project, with nothing to show for it. [It's well over $50 million now, given all the stupidity that occurred beyond this.]

    It was at this point that Lorenzo DiBonaventura, a then-WB exec who was a long-time ally of Peters, joined the production and openly supported everything Burton wanted to do with Superman. It was with DiBonaventura that Burton and Peters had Gilroy rewrite the script completely, mixing and matching elements from the Strick, Goldsman, Bass, and Gilroy drafts into a single script. The end result had Jor-El inventing Brainiac, only to abandon him when Kal-El is born. Brainiac is jealous of Kal-El, so he blows up Krypton. However, Kal-El is sent to Earth, so Brainiac vows to hunt him down and kill him. Jump forward 30 years. Superman'who's been having a full-blown sexual affair with Lois'is forced to reveal his true identity to her when she finds out that Superman's escape rocket landed on the Kent farm. (In this script, the Kents were long dead, and Superman himself had absolutely no clue as to his origins'not even knowing about the existence of the rocket'until Lois found it.) Anyway, Brainiac comes to Earth with a kryptonite-bleeding Doomsday and merges with Lex Luthor'who in this draft was basically portrayed as the Joker in a business suit, and who also found out about Superman's rocket landing in Smallville in this draft'to become "Lexiac." So Lexiac tricks Superman into coming to the LexCorp tower, where Doomsday kills him in combat and runs off. (He never shows up again in this draft.) Then Lexiac seizes control of all the world's nukes and seduces Lois'who's pregnant with Superman's love child!!!!! Meanwhile, Superman is revived by "K," the combined, still-living essence of Jor-El and Lara. Initially powerless upon his rebirth, Superman is told by "K" that all he needs to do is have faith in himself, and so regains his powers by sheer force of will (yes, yes, I know he's supposed to get them back by exposure to sunlight, but bear in mind what we're dealing with here). And so Superman engages Lexiac in combat and saves the world with one second left on the nuclear clock, separating Brainiac and Luthor, who has no idea that he was possessed by Brainiac. And while Lois and Clark are undecided if they want to get married or just live together, all that matters is that they're happy.

    This was the script Burton proffered in late 1998. WB loved it, but Burton's egotistical attitude was wearing thin on them. It came to the point where Burton started smart-mouthing them, trying to bully them into giving him his way. As such, WB finally fired him in late '98/early '99. (Burton was furious over this, and tried to pin every bit of the blame for Superman Lives' lack of progress on WB and paint himself as a total innocent in his book Burton on Burton. Needless to say, everyone knew he was lying thru his teeth, and blew him off. Burton also claimed to Howard Stern that the WB execs at one point wanted Superman to wear basketball shorts and flame-boots. Considering that he was still trying to play the total innocent, I'd say this claim is pretty suspect.)
     
  16. SPLIT LIP

    SPLIT LIP Dry built

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    And suddenly Superman Returns isn't so bad.
     
  17. Andersonh1

    Andersonh1 Man, I've been here a LONG time Veteran

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    I must be the only one who really enjoyed Superman Returns. :lol 

    Yeah, this Burton suit looks awful. Not Superman at all.
     
  18. E. C. R. Former

    E. C. R. Former Is probably insane...

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    I loved Superman Returns as well and I really feel like the film doesn't deserve the amount of flak it gets. Nor do I really understand why it gets so much flak.

    That said, Good Lord am I glad WB canned Burton's version.
     
  19. lars573

    lars573 Well-Known Member

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    Anyone who has heard anything about what Burton wanted to do is too.
     
  20. toma

    toma eskimo in disguise

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    Is this the suit from the script by Kevin Smith where the Eradicator basically turns into his suit for a while after his "death"?
     

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