Customs: Thin seam cuts and rotating parts

Discussion in 'Creative General Discussion' started by I AM MEGATRON, May 8, 2009.

  1. I AM MEGATRON

    I AM MEGATRON pleasure model

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    Hi, I've had a few ideas lately that involve cuts that would leave gaps that were as thin as possible, and also some which would have parts rotating on top of others. Can anyone give any advice on how to approach doing these things? I know for the thin cuts a thin cutting wheel is good, but the thin wheels remove too much material for my liking. Is there any other method? And for rotating parts, is there anyway of doing this without having to put a hole all the way through one of the pieces?
    Thanks

    (Edit: I had been searching for the wrong keywords for thin cutting, found one right after. Still need help on the rotations though)
     
  2. REDLINE

    REDLINE longer days, plz? Veteran

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    not really, at least, not without building a plug piece that would fit between the two parts, and you'd be talking a pretty healthy sized gap you'd be left with between them.
     
  3. big hank

    big hank Resident Slacker-Basher

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    Seems like you found an answer to your thin cut question already, but a great method is using cotton thread.

    1.Place your plastic piece o be cut in a vise or clamp.
    2.Wrap the thread around your fingers like you would dental floss.
    3.Saw away! The friction heat generated will give a very, very thin cut.

    Some things to remember, don't use wax coated thread, it won't give you the bite you need. Don't use nylon thread either, same reason. Finally, if the thread breaks, just wind up a new piece and you are good to go!:thumbs2: 

    As for the second question, do you mean like two pieces maybe riveted together so they can swivel or rotate? If so I may have a trick for ya on making cheap plastic rivets from styrene!
     
  4. I AM MEGATRON

    I AM MEGATRON pleasure model

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    wow..i never thought of a thread saw before...that might actually be really helpful thanks! As to the second question, I figure a huge gap would be created in most attempts to make the pieces rotate but that's unacceptable. I was looking to not have any penetration of the base pieces being rotated. But riveting is the closest thing I can think of to what i want....even though it would have to penetrate the pieces. If you'd be so kind as to share this secret styrene rivet technique I'd really appreciate it..lol. Thanks
     
  5. Superquad7

    Superquad7 We're only human. Super Mod

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    Wow, that's a pretty good idea! Perhaps you're not as retarded as you think you are? :poke 
     
  6. big hank

    big hank Resident Slacker-Basher

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    LOL! Not a problem, let me recharge my camera's battery and I'll do up a little lesson!:thumbs2: 


    O but I are!:dunce 

    :thumbs2: 
     

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