The rise and Fall of Disney's Circle 7 animation

Discussion in 'Movies and Television' started by eagc7, Apr 9, 2012.

  1. eagc7

    eagc7 Well-Known Member

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  2. Moonlight1102

    Moonlight1102 Banned

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    Disney seems to be known for cancelling a lot of animated projects. Rather interesting ones at that.

    Like A Few Good Ghosts.

    [​IMG]

    And Fraidy Cat.

    [​IMG]

    We seriously need some demo reels of these.
     
  3. uruseiranma

    uruseiranma Well-Known Member

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    There's always going to be projects that were cancelled or changed.

    Bolt was originally a project titled 'American Dog,' that was under the supervision of Chris Sanders. It would have been quite wacky and strange, but the tone was changed when John Lasseter came aboard Disney, and Chris headed out the door and over to Dreamworks.

    But in truth, I always saw Circle 7 as another one of those hands of poker that Disney was playing, trying to thumb its nose at Pixar, telling them 'we don't need you.'

    Disney did a move similar to that by plastering their name on some 3rd rate animated films like 'The Wild' and 'Valiant.' I only saw 'The Wild,' but the story was just so pedestrian and recycled, that it definitely felt like a cash grab (my sister's ex-bf at the time told me they were looking to hire freelance animators for 'The Wild,' but my stuff wasn't up to snuff, and I would have had to head North to Canada).

    The integrity of the Disney name was crumbling at the time, and nothing they were putting out feature animation-wise was making me excited. King Mikey had truly gone mad at the time, and Ialways love one quote from the Steve Jobs biography, where Eisner got word of Bob Iger's planned billion-dollar deal to buy Pixar.

    Eisner told Iger that he didn't need to spend all that money, and taht he could fix animation himself.

    "Michael," said Iger, "You couldn't fix Disney Animation. So what makes you think I can fix it?"
     

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