The Comic History of Captain Marvel (Carol Danvers) [BLOG]

Discussion in 'Comic Books and Graphic Novels' started by Ikkstakk, Aug 7, 2016.

  1. Ikkstakk

    Ikkstakk Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2010
    Posts:
    9,012
    News Credits:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    242
    Likes:
    +5,750
    My favorite character in the Marvel Universe is Carol Danvers. In this blog I will trace her near-fifty-year history in comic books, beginning with her first appearance, in preparation for the Captain Marvel movie set to release on March 8, 2019 and star Brie Larson. With determination and luck, I will make it to the present day by then. Comments and discussion are welcome, of course. I will attempt to update weekly and I will be doing complete storylines instead of individual issues.

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
    "The Coming of Captain Marvel!"
    Marvel Super-Heroes #12
    Marvel Super-Heroes #13
    Captain Marvel #1
    published December 1967-May 1968
    written by Stan Lee and Roy Thomas, penciled by Gene Colan

    Carol Danvers actually doesn't appear until Marvel Super-Heroes #13, part 2 of this story, but given her connection to the original Captain Marvel I'm going to grandfather in #12, which is his first appearance. And it might be awkward to discuss parts 2 and 3 of a story but not part 1.

    A starship of the alien Kree arrives at Earth, carrying Captain Mar-Vell and commanded by the sinister Colonel Yon-Rogg, who vies with Mar-Vell for the affections of the ship's medic Una. Mar-Vell's mission is to determine if humans have become enough of a threat to the Kree that they need to be eradicated. He takes on the identity of Dr. Walter Lawson, an expert on missile guidance systems, who was killed in a failed assassination attempt Yon-Rogg made on Mar-Vell. As Lawson, Mar-Vell takes a position at Cape Kennedy and begins investigating humanity's scientific progress. There he meets General Bridges, who brings him in on a top-secret project...

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Yon-Rogg reactivates the Sentry remotely, knowing that it will begin destroying the base and hoping it will kill Mar-Vell, who is compelled to fight it. During the battle, Carol becomes curious about their apparent defender...

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Mar-Vell defeats the Sentry and is hailed as a hero by the base personnel, but he flies away before anyone can question him.

    So in Carol's first appearance, she's established as a great chief of security for an important missile base, suspicious of the stranger Dr. Lawson, but perhaps a bit enamored of the far stranger Captain Marvel. And yet, despite her position of authority, her concerns are dismissed by the base commander and she falls into the "damsel in distress" trope so common in comics of the era. An ignominious debut, perhaps, but of course at this point, she was only intended to be the female love interest of the male hero.
     
    Last edited: Jul 5, 2017
    • Like Like x 1
  2. Ikkstakk

    Ikkstakk Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2010
    Posts:
    9,012
    News Credits:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    242
    Likes:
    +5,750
    [​IMG] [​IMG]
    "From the Void of Space Comes... The Super Skrull!"
    Captain Marvel #2
    Captain Marvel #3
    published June-July 1968
    written by Roy Thomas, penciled by Gene Colan

    The Skrulls take notice of Captain Marvel's activities on Earth, and the Super-Skrull is sent to find out what their ancient enemies are up to. The Super-Skrull gets his hands on Marvel's luggage, which contains a nuclear bomb that will go off if anyone tries to open the luggage. Marvel attacks the Super-Skrull but gets overpowered and captured. The Super-Skrull uses his psycho-probe to find out what Marvel's mission is, and after Marvel escapes and returns to the Kree ship, gets the idea to infiltrate the Cape as Walter Lawson...

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Marvel defeats the Super-Skrull (by using a solar mirror to cause the Skrull to hypnotize himself and then telling him to leave) and defuses the nuclear device.

    Not much to say about Carol's appearance here, she continues to be marginalized by her boss despite having correct instincts about Lawson (and a teensy bit of irrationality about Captain Marvel).
     
    Last edited: Jul 5, 2017
  3. Switchblade

    Switchblade Just a raggedy man

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2005
    Posts:
    14,007
    News Credits:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    312
    Likes:
    +697
    Cool project.

    Carol Danvers is a character that I know I shouldn't hate nearly as much as I do, but all of my early encounters with her were so negative that they can't help but taint my very concept of who the character is. I'm open to the movie fixing this, but I don't know if I'll ever be able to not despise the comic version.
     
  4. Ikkstakk

    Ikkstakk Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2010
    Posts:
    9,012
    News Credits:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    242
    Likes:
    +5,750
    I'll grant you, she is often written in a decidedly unsympathetic way. What were your early encounters with her?
     
  5. Ikkstakk

    Ikkstakk Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2010
    Posts:
    9,012
    News Credits:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    242
    Likes:
    +5,750
    [​IMG]
    "The Alien and the Amphibian!"
    Captain Marvel #4
    published August 1968
    written by Roy Thomas, penciled by Gene Colan

    Mar-Vell agonizes over his mission, knowing he may be ordered to destroy humanity, when the clerk at the hotel where he's staying alerts him that the Cape has called and wants him at the base right away. He gets a ride from an observant cabdriver who remembers him from before...

    [​IMG]

    The rocket contains deadly bacteria that Bridges wants to study reacting to cosmic rays, but Yon-Rogg redirects the rocket to crash off the coast of New York City so the Kree can study the bacteria killing millions of humans. At the same time, Namor the Sub-Mariner is on his way to New York on a peace mission...

    [​IMG]

    Marvel deftly allows Namor to win the fight, destroying the bacteria in the process, while making it appear to both Namor and the watching Yon-Rogg that he was not in fact trying to lose.

    Again, Carol does a fine job of being a fairly one-dimensional supporting cast member here (and looks quite fetching in her cable-knit sweater that both has and doesn't have sleeves), but otherwise, nothing new has been added here, just reiteration of what we already know.
     
    Last edited: Jul 5, 2017
  6. Switchblade

    Switchblade Just a raggedy man

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2005
    Posts:
    14,007
    News Credits:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    312
    Likes:
    +697
    Busiek's Avengers and Civil War (specifically summaries of it, since I didn't read the event itself). To me she's always the woman who tried to fly to the moon drunk and beat up Spider-Woman in front of her daughter.
     
  7. Ikkstakk

    Ikkstakk Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2010
    Posts:
    9,012
    News Credits:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    242
    Likes:
    +5,750
    Ah yes, that was some hard stuff to read. The flying to the moon drunk was one of Carol's lowest points, during the period when she was losing her powers and turned to alcohol to cope. Hopefully, the blog here will put behavior like that into context, make it more understandable.

    Or, hey, maybe not and it'll just look like bad writing!
     
  8. Ikkstakk

    Ikkstakk Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2010
    Posts:
    9,012
    News Credits:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    242
    Likes:
    +5,750
    [​IMG]
    "The Mark of the Metazoid"
    Captain Marvel #5
    published September 1968
    written by Arnold Drake, penciled by Don Heck

    Colonel Yon-Rogg, still trying to disgrace Captain Mar-Vell in any way he can, has Mar-Vell put on trial before Ronan the Accuser (Skyping in from the Kree homeworld) for failing to stop Namor from destroying the bacteria. Due to Mar-Vell's stellar record up to this point, Ronan decides to delay judgment and see how Mar-Vell behaves during the rest of the mission. Mar-Vell returns to Earth to erase the memory of the comatose hotel clerk who may know he's really an alien. Meanwhile, a foreign power on Earth (never stated to be the Soviet Union, but it totally is) transforms one of their convicted citizens into the Metazoid, a monstrous ape-like creature, and sends him to capture Dr. Walter Lawson...

    [​IMG]

    The Metazoid attacks Mar-Vell at the hospital where the hotel clerk is being treated, and though Mar-Vell is successful in using his "mind eraser" to wipe the clerk's memory of him, he is forced to kill the Metazoid.

    So, a new creative team with this issue, and Carol interrogating Mar-Vell, but really, if the sexism was bad when Roy Thomas was writing it, it's off the charts under Arnold Drake. He does appear to be moving the plot along, at least.
     
    Last edited: Jul 5, 2017
  9. Ikkstakk

    Ikkstakk Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2010
    Posts:
    9,012
    News Credits:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    242
    Likes:
    +5,750
    [​IMG]
    "In the Path of Solam!"
    Captain Marvel #6
    published October 1968
    written by Arnold Drake, penciled by Don Heck

    The Kree starship encounters engine trouble, requiring them to land to make repairs. For a split second, their invisibility screen collapses and they are observed by Carol Danvers, whose car swerves and almost hits Mar-Vell, walking along the road...

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    The next day, disaster is narrowly averted when a brilliant scientist working at the Cape activates his giant solar energy weapon, designed to draw solar power from the sun and concentrate it into a laser beam strong enough to reach Saturn, and it overloads, creating a monstrous photo-kinetic life-form. Fortunately, the Kree have fought photo-kinetic beings in the past, and Captain Marvel destroys the creature by feeding it uncontrollable amounts of solar energy until it explodes.

    Some slight plot advancement this issue, as Carol catches a glimpse of the Kree starship and the antagonistic flirting with Lawson becomes more overt.
     
    Last edited: Jul 5, 2017
  10. Ikkstakk

    Ikkstakk Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2010
    Posts:
    9,012
    News Credits:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    242
    Likes:
    +5,750
    [​IMG]
    "Die, Town, Die!"
    Captain Marvel #7
    published November 1968
    written by Arnold Drake, penciled by Don Heck

    Mar-Vell again faces Ronan the Accuser, this time for saving the Cape from the photo-kinetic life-form. To prove his loyalty beyond doubt, Ronan orders him to use a deadly virus to murder the entire population of an Earth city. He returns to Earth just in time to save Carol Danvers, whose investigation into the UFO she saw has invited Yon-Rogg to try to kill her with a cosmic energy charge...

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    At the same time, Quasimodo the Living Computer attacks, using his power to control all machines, and Captain Marvel pursues him to an amusement park designed to look like a town from the 1930s, complete with a population of robotic citizens. When Marvel knocks out Quasimodo, he makes it appear to the observing Yon-Rogg that he's used the Kree virus to kill all of these "people."

    And here, a new wrinkle added: Yon-Rogg has become aware of Marvel's apparent interest in Carol, and of her interest in him. This won't be a problem...
     
    Last edited: Jul 5, 2017
  11. Murasame

    Murasame CHIMICHANGAS

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2008
    Posts:
    20,067
    News Credits:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    337
    Location:
    The Lost Light
    Likes:
    +4,501
    Dana Scully?
     
  12. GoLion

    GoLion No longer a collector

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2014
    Posts:
    6,926
    News Credits:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    242
    Likes:
    +2,606
    Quick questio: Do you plan to touch on the plot with Rogue?
     
  13. Ikkstakk

    Ikkstakk Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2010
    Posts:
    9,012
    News Credits:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    242
    Likes:
    +5,750
    Yeah, you know, from the X-Files? Didn't believe in UFOs, aliens, supernatural or paranormal phenomena? Bit of the opposite of Miss Danvers, here?

    Oh yes, quite a bit. Rogue's going to get a LOT of coverage here. The incident with her in Avengers Annual #10 is one of the biggest events in Carol's life. I may even cover all of the X-Men books where Rogue is "possessed" by Carol's personality.

    Things are a bit dull right now because Carol isn't the protagonist in these issues and she really isn't doing much, one of the reasons I'm trying to shoot through this early, pre-powers era fairly quickly. We're in kind of an extended prologue at the moment. Things will pick up once I get to her first ongoing (hopefully by the end of this month/early next month).
     
  14. Ikkstakk

    Ikkstakk Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2010
    Posts:
    9,012
    News Credits:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    242
    Likes:
    +5,750
    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
    "And Fear Shall Follow!"
    "Between Hammer and Anvil!"
    "Die, Traitor!"
    Captain Marvel #8-#10
    published December 1968-February 1969
    written by Arnold Drake, penciled by Don Heck

    After Yon-Rogg leads the Kree soldiers in a battle against Aakon traders on Earth's moon, Mar-Vell goes back to Earth and visits the home of Dr. Walter Lawson to find it a palatial estate full of expensive decor, which seems suspiciously unaffordable for a research scientist. He finds a hidden laboratory with evidence that Lawson had built a giant robot named Cyberex. While there, he's attacked by a pair of assassins whose expository dialogue lets him know that they work for a clandestine Organization that paid Lawson twelve million dollars to build Cyberex, and now they're here to collect. After they're dead...

    [​IMG]

    Mar-Vell learns from computer cards confiscated from Lawson's lab that he had programmed Cyberex to hunt and kill Lawson himself. Shortly, Cyberex turns up at the Cape, tracking Lawson's scent, and Captain Marvel engages it in battle. He destroys it as everyone watches, but no one realizes Cyberex has a self-repair mechanism. Later that evening, Carol Danvers breaks into Lawson's hotel room and gets captured by Cyberex, who plans to use her as bait to attract Lawson, and when Mar-Vell returns to the hotel, he's delayed by the police, who think he must know more about why his room was searched and why the robot attacked than he lets on...

    [​IMG]

    Eventually, Captain Marvel returns to Lawson's home where Cyberex is holding Carol, and they battle again. The vengeful Aakon traders track Marvel there and join the fight, but Cyberex kills them all before Marvel finally destroys it for good. He makes out with the appreciative Carol and then returns to the Kree starship where Ronan, on another long-distance call, orders him to investigate the Organization, which the Kree find to be a potentially beneficial partner in destabilizing Earth's governments in the future. The Organization, meanwhile, has orders to kill Dr. Lawson using an "eon-ray," an entropy-acceleration gun that Lawson also built for them...

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    The criminals grab Carol and flee while Marvel fights the pterodactyl, and Marvel follows instructions on a ransom note they left behind and is brought before the Organization's leader, where he proposes an alliance. As Carol is being led away, he slips her a canister of knockout gas that she can use to escape her guards. When they recover and bring word that she's gone, Marvel turns on the Organization's leader, and after a large fight, he gets control of the eon-ray and ages everyone in the building--and even the building itself--to dust. Unfortunately, the observing Kree see this as a direct violation of their command, and Ronan decrees that Marvel is to be executed immediately by firing squad.

    Carol does display some initiative in this story, realizing that even though she's head of security at the Cape, she's still breaking the law by sneaking into Lawson's hotel room, but she still trusts Captain Marvel far too much to be believable and she was captured twice, by Lawson's robot and by the Organization. And strangely seems to believe he has many powers he doesn't (but stay tuned--things are about to get crazy).
     
    Last edited: Jul 5, 2017
  15. Ikkstakk

    Ikkstakk Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2010
    Posts:
    9,012
    News Credits:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    242
    Likes:
    +5,750
    [​IMG] [​IMG]
    "Rebirth!"
    "The Moment of the Man-Slayer!"
    Captain Marvel #11-#12
    published March-April 1969
    written by Arnold Drake, penciled by Dick Ayers

    Captain Marvel is saved from an untimely execution at the hands of his own people when the surviving Aakon traders attack and vaporize the firing squad. Yon-Rogg leads the Kree soldiers in a counterattack, and amid the fighting, Medic Una is mortally wounded. Enraged, Mar-Vell attacks Yon-Rogg directly, but when he realizes Una is still alive he scoops her up and flies away...

    [​IMG]

    Una dies shortly into the trip, and Mar-Vell builds a shrine for her body on an airless asteroid near Mars before heading back to face Yon-Rogg. But Yon-Rogg uses the superior Kree starship's magnetic ray to ensnare the Earth rocket and send it hurtling through space. Mar-Vell comes to believe he's going insane during the voyage, when over one hundred days later the rocket lands on an unknown planet. There he meets a godlike alien being called Zo, who bestows upon him incredible superpowers that he can use to take revenge on Yon-Rogg in exchange for his complete subservience to Zo forever after.

    One of Mar-Vell's new powers is interstellar teleportation, and he uses it to return instantly to Earth, resuming his identity as Dr. Walter Lawson and preparing to return to the Cape...

    [​IMG]

    But just as the MPs are about to arrest Lawson, a murderous robot called the Man-Slayer appears. When the Man-Slayer moves to destroy the moon rocket, Mar-Vell changes into his Captain Marvel uniform and attacks. The Man-Slayer overpowers Mar-Vell but freezes just as he's about to deliver the killing blow; back at the secret control center, Black Widow has destroyed the Man-Slayer's energy transmitter...

    [​IMG]

    So some big changes here, Una dies, Mar-Vell gains actual superpowers, and Carol gives the order to arrest him, and you feel like the story might finally be moving... and then, quite randomly, the Black Widow shows up. This issue is part of a crossover story that's running through Avengers and Sub-Mariner involving the Mad Thinker (who created the Man-Slayer), the Puppet Master, and a plot to take over the Earth. (Proving that even in the '60s crossovers derailed everything.) And there's more of it next issue, along with a new creative team.
     
    Last edited: Jul 5, 2017
  16. Ikkstakk

    Ikkstakk Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2010
    Posts:
    9,012
    News Credits:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    242
    Likes:
    +5,750
    [​IMG] [​IMG]
    "Traitors or Heroes?"
    "When a Galaxy Beckons..."
    Captain Marvel #13-#14
    published May-June 1969
    written by Gary Friedrich, penciled by Frank Springer

    Hours after Captain Marvel appeared to take down the Man-Slayer, its self-repair mechanism resurrects it and it again moves to destroy the moon rocket. Captain Marvel returns to battle it again, this time finding it doubting its mission (because the Mad Thinker is no longer controlling it). But when the soldiers, still thinking he's a traitor, open fire on him, he teleports out of the area and back to the Kree starship to take his revenge upon Yon-Rogg. After a brief altercation, Yon-Rogg reveals that after Mar-Vell left earth, the Man-Slayer attacked Carol Danvers. Mar-Vell knocks Yon-Rogg unconscious, grabs a weapon, and teleports back to Earth to save her...

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Before Carol can convince Captain Marvel to give himself up and face justice at a trial, Iron Man shows up, under the control of the Puppet Master, and attempts to kill him...

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Carol is taken away in an ambulance and Captain Marvel defeats Iron Man, causing the Puppet Master to smash his puppet in a rage, freeing Iron Man from his control. Captain Marvel teleports into interstellar space, lost and in anguish, and is contacted by Zo, who commands him to return to his homeworld in the Kree galaxy for an assignment.

    Honestly, not much to say here, except to point out that these issues were penciled by inaugural Transformers penciler Frank Springer, and that these issues seem to be a real regression for Carol's character. On the one hand, she's not the star or the focus. On the other hand, dialogue like what she says on the pages above make it practically unbelievable that she could ever rise to the position of security chief on a rocket base.
     
    Last edited: Jul 5, 2017
  17. Ikkstakk

    Ikkstakk Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2010
    Posts:
    9,012
    News Credits:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    242
    Likes:
    +5,750
    Carol Danvers doesn't appear in Captain Marvel #15 at all, therefore I'm skipping it (though I'll leave this post as a placeholder just in case I want to come back later and add it). All you really need to know is, Captain Marvel returns to the planet of his birth where Zo assigns him to kill an apparent malevolent deity called Tam-Bor, whose natural magnetism is going to pull every planet in the solar system to him, destroying them. Pretend that I made the Arrested Development joke of your choice here.
     
  18. Ikkstakk

    Ikkstakk Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2010
    Posts:
    9,012
    News Credits:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    242
    Likes:
    +5,750
    [​IMG]
    "Behind the Mask of Zo!"
    Captain Marvel #16
    published September 1969
    written by Archie Goodwin, penciled by Don Heck

    Captain Marvel is captured by the worshippers of Tam-Bor, who allow him to be pulled toward the giant idol via its magnetism to be killed. Mar-Vell spots an entrance at the base of Tam-Bor and gets inside, where he's attacked by Ronan the Accuser, who is strangely disinterested in Mar-Vell's warnings that Tam-Bor will destroy the Kree solar system if Ronan doesn't blow it up. Evading Ronan, Mar-Vell sets his helmet to self-destruct and uses it as a grenade to explode Tam-Bor's generator, causing a chain reaction that destroys the entire construct...

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    On Mar-Vell's homeworld, the Supreme Intelligence's personal guard, the Super Sentry, appears and stops Ronan from killing Mar-Vell. The Sentry transports itself and Mar-Vell to Hala, the Kree homeworld, where Mar-Vell appears before the Supreme Intelligence, the leader of the Kree Empire. There Mar-Vell learns he's been a pawn in a plot orchestrated by Ronan and Zarek, the Imperial Minister, to depose the Supreme Intelligence and take over the Kree Empire. Zo was merely Zarek in disguise, trying to set up Mar-Vell as a traitor and getting him held responsible for Tam-Bor. The Supreme Intelligence honors Mar-Vell for his service by changing his costume and then allows him to return to Earth to dispose of Yon-Rogg, but on the way, radiation causes him to fall into the Negative Zone.

    The series had been returning lower and lower sales for a while now, so it's perhaps understandable that with this issue, we have yet another new writer (though Archie Goodwin was only filling in until original writer Roy Thomas could return next issue), a quick wrap-up to the Zo plot, and that hallmark of trying to give a title a sales boost, the character redesign/costume change. This issue marks only the second-ever appearance by the Kree Supreme Intelligence, who wins the backhanded compliment of the year award by bestowing upon Captain Marvel the ultimate honor of personal recognition (apparent by the new costume) while in the same sentence decreeing that he shall never advance in rank beyond captain due to his questionable devotion to Earth and its people. And here's Carol again, getting captured by yet another antagonist (at least it's the series' central antagonist this time).
     
    Last edited: Jul 5, 2017
  19. Ikkstakk

    Ikkstakk Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2010
    Posts:
    9,012
    News Credits:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    242
    Likes:
    +5,750
    [​IMG]
    "And a Child Shall Lead You!"
    Captain Marvel #17
    published October 1969
    written by Roy Thomas, penciled by Gil Kane

    Carol doesn't appear in this issue either, but it's a pretty major status quo upheaval for Captain Marvel, as Captain America's ex-sidekick Rick Jones joins the series. Quitting his role as Bucky (because currently Captain America has been replaced by a disguised Red Skull), Captain Marvel is able to cause Rick Jones to see a ghostlike image of Captain America that leads him to an abandoned Kree laboratory that houses forbidden technology called the Nega-Bands, a pair of bracelets that are the antidote to the radiation that blasted Mar-Vell into the Negative Zone. By coercing Rick Jones to put on the Nega-Bands and slam his wrists together, his atoms and Rick's change places, allowing Mar-Vell to return to the real world but sending Rick into the Negative Zone.

    Yon-Rogg suddenly attacks, having followed Rick Jones to the cavern, but flees in his spaceship when he finds Mar-Vell virtually invulnerable due to the power conferred upon him by the Nega-Bands. As he escapes, Captain Marvel flying after him...

    [​IMG]

    Mar-Vell lands and slams the Nega-Bands together, returning to the Negative Zone and allowing Rick Jones to return to Earth. Now the two share a common fate and a common foe, and Rick begins the search for Yon-Rogg.

    So you can see what happened here; Roy Thomas, in revamping Captain Marvel, decided to turn him into a loose homage to that other Captain Marvel, a.k.a. Shazam, who was not being published at this time (his original owner, Fawcett Comics, had ceased his publication in 1953 after a lawsuit from DC Comics), with Rick Jones cast in the role of Billy Batson. Unfortunately, he brought over a bit too much whimsy with the homage; Yon-Rogg has become such a cardboard cutout villain at this point that he's only missing the moustache to twirl, and building a bomb in the perfect image of Carol Danvers really is so much Wile E. Coyote.
     
    Last edited: Jul 5, 2017
  20. Ikkstakk

    Ikkstakk Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2010
    Posts:
    9,012
    News Credits:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    242
    Likes:
    +5,750
    [​IMG]
    "Vengeance is Mine!"
    Captain Marvel #18
    published November 1969
    written by Roy Thomas, penciled by Gil Kane and John Buscema

    Captain Marvel deduces that Yon-Rogg has returned to the Kree laboratory/storage facility where they found the Nega-Bands, and heads there for a final confrontation. He's right, as Yon-Rogg has discovered that the cavern contains another outlawed device: the Psyche-Magnitron, a giant machine that he believes will give him the power to overthrow the Supreme Intelligence and become master of the universe...

    [​IMG]

    Captain Marvel arrives and enters into battle with the Mandroid. By jumping in front of the Psyche-Magnitron, he causes the Mandroid's eye beams to critically damage it, and since the Magnitron was powering the Mandroid, the Mandroid promptly vanishes. Enraged, Yon-Rogg tries to shoot Mar-Vell with a hand-laser, but Mar-Vell tackles him and they struggle over the weapon. It fires and hits Carol Danvers in the shoulder. Now believing Yon-Rogg is responsible for the deaths of two women he's loved, Mar-Vell beats Yon-Rogg into submission and is about to deliver the killing blow when he realizes he's about to become a murderer, and...

    [​IMG]

    Free of the now-buried cavern and confirming that Carol will live, Mar-Vell changes places with Rick Jones, who inherits Mar-Vell's exhaustion from the battle and falls unconscious.

    ...And we're through the '60s! With this issue, Carol Danvers ceases to be a supporting character in the Captain Marvel series. Only one line in #19 says that she's "safe in a Cape hospital." Two more issues, and the struggling series would go on a two-year hiatus.

    But what of Carol? Well, this incident with the exploding Psyche-Magnitron is what famously caused her DNA to mutate into a hybrid of human and Kree, thus giving her superpowers, though that's pretty clearly a retcon (Roy Thomas had no intention of Carol developing powers, from this or any of her adventures with Mar-Vell). And we're still quite a ways away from those powers, which Carol first displays in Ms. Marvel #1, cover dated January 1977. Where is she in the meantime? She makes a handful of appearances in the early to mid-1970s, and the next entry will cover the first (which is arguable, as I'll explain)... in the pages of Avengers, and the KREE-SKRULL WAR!
     
    Last edited: Jul 5, 2017

Share This Page