Customs: TFP Arcee, 1:4 scale

Discussion in 'Creative General Discussion' started by wd62mdOT, Dec 29, 2017.

  1. TheOneTrueTiem

    TheOneTrueTiem New Member

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    So what is your argument again, Beacuse I think Sammtehkat makes a lot of good points. You can not just come into a community and make an ass out of yourself and expect help. Also why would anyone actually help help? How does this benifit me, Beacuse I don’t have the money to pay for one if it gets completed.
     
  2. wd62mdOT

    wd62mdOT Member

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    If you go over what I wrote, poster newer than I, you are sure to find the answers you seek.
     
  3. Sammytehkat

    Sammytehkat New Member

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    Please, explain how it'll benefit the majority of people. The only people I can see this benefitting is... You. I honestly can't see anyone else being so much of a prime arcee fan that they'd blow provably thousands on a 1:4 scale arcee. If you were making a much smaller figure with a much more reasonable pricetag, then sure, someone might want it and be able to get it. I can't think of many people that have the money to buy a figure the size of a first grader.
     
  4. TheOneTrueTiem

    TheOneTrueTiem New Member

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    okay, so I, who doesn’t have the money for the 1:4 arcee donates to you $150.00 to pay for this figure. In return I get what? Blueprints to build my own figure? My name on some plaque that tells people I helped pay for it? Beacuse it sure seems like I’m getting nothing in return in this scenario, but if I’m wrong please correct me.
     
  5. Snaku

    Snaku Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, I'm going to assume you genuinely believe nothing you've said is rude and you didn't mean it that way at all and we can just pretend none of that ever happened. As far as credit, I don't give even the tiniest of damns about that. If I'm able to give you any useful info, take it and do whatever the hell you want with it. Tell people you came up with it on your own or that Santa Claus gave it to you for all I care. My own limited participation in the community is because I enjoy this stuff and I enjoy assisting others with it on the rare occasion that I have something useful to contribute. I also don't care if you share the design with the community and, in fact, I wouldn't expect very many people to do that unless they're feeling especially generous. Certainly if you design an entire figure from scratch, and it's something people might want, you deserve to make some sort of profit whether that's by selling it to people directly or selling it to a 3p company or just putting it on a Shapeways store. You might consider sharing any lessons or tips you learn while working on this project but that's up to you.

    Your question about whether or not the cartoon robot model could actually transform into the cartoon alt mode: no. Absolutely not. Just give up on that idea right now. They designed it to look good and to look just enough like it would actually transform to be convincing in a cartoon. The fact that you're even asking is a credit to their work, but no. You're going to need to design yours pretty much from scratch, though, again, I still heartily recommend taking some design queues from the toy.

    What I would suggest is drawing up (or grabbing screen shots) your ideal representation of her bot and alt modes and decide which parts you can find that match up and which parts don't. Of the parts that don't, decide which ones it's most important to preserve the look of. Is it important to you that her lower back look exactly as it does in the cartoon? Figure out where you can stick it in alt mode. The little wing things above her shoulders? Find a part of the alt mode that they could be or fit inside. The half tires in the backs of her legs? Seriously, just copy that directly from the toy: that thing was genius. Then start figuring out which parts look close enough that they won't detract from your vision. Maybe the motorcycle seat could form the small of her back (like it does on the toy) even though the cartoon has smooth metal there. Those parts that don't fit your vision: figure out a way to hide them in the other mode. Maybe some parts turn inside out. Unique Toys Peru Kill is an amazing example of what you can do for that kind of engineering.
     
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  6. JoeScibelli

    JoeScibelli That one Piranacon fanboy

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    A bit of an example of this; the FE toy. The headlights manage to turn into the breastplate in robot mode, but they look kinda off. The shape is wrong and they have more details. The CGI model shifts and morphs parts as much as possible to get it to look right, regardless of what physics allow.
     
  7. wd62mdOT

    wd62mdOT Member

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    Sammytehkat and TheOneTrueTiem are both either misconstruing or outright misrepresenting what I have written, so I shall not waste time responding to them. I've already said that I will no longer participate in the bickering, and that's that.

    Snaku, I understand that there may not be a perfect transformation possible, but at the very least I hope that comparing the game models will give me some idea of which parts ostensibly move to which locations. Comparing the drawings provided by RobotKnight95, it seems there's a degree of similarity in key shapes between forms, though the size of components relative to each other may very well differ based on what the artists were trying to achieve.

    JoeScibelli, I do anticipate that some squeezing and stretching may be required to make the models work together. A mere glance at her robot form shows that the tires are abnormally small, and though the miracle of advanced technology could be used to explain that in fiction, the difference is something that I'll have to deal with by more mundane means. I imagine it will be a balancing act of what looks good, though obviously even that must give way to realism in vehicle form.
     
  8. wd62mdOT

    wd62mdOT Member

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    Maybe I'm just being redundant, but here's another key point... All of the blue parts on the motorcycle are simple, solid panels. They might be able to split apart in places where we don't necessarily perceive there being seams, but almost certainly they don't bend or deform. Taken to a ridiculous extreme, this means that her blue panels could perhaps be composed of thousands of tiny fragments (not dissimilar to the live-action version of Galvatron). A conservative level of splitting, folding, rotation, and even rearranging, however, might allow her robot form to closely match the look in the show. The downside is that the added complexity makes engineering it all the more troublesome.
     
  9. Snaku

    Snaku Well-Known Member

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    For the leg wheels you've got a serious advantage in that you're working in such a large scale. You could copy the Fe Arcee's split wheel Transformation but then go a step further by having the half pieces split in half again (or even just have a third of it split off and fold away. Then, the remaining piece can be folded into a tighter radius to give the appearance of smaller wheels. If you use rubber tires, they'll just conform to the new smaller shape. The trick is going to be the center of the wheel since it's not exactly hollow but I'm sure there are tricks to get segments to slide past each other and maybe even cover them with a false smaller inner wheel panel that folds out of her leg. It'll be an intricate transformation to be sure and it's up to you whether making the leg wheels smaller is worth all the trouble.

    Also, if you're replying to specific people, we won't get an alert if you just type our names. Try putting an @ in front of the name like this @Snaku or you can just quote our messages. That way we'll get an alert and know to come take a look.
     
  10. wd62mdOT

    wd62mdOT Member

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    @Snaku: I'd like to say I would have come up with the wheel idea myself, but probably not, so thanks for saving me the effort! My default assumption was that the leg wheels, and perhaps more so the spine wheel, would have to be withdrawn into the lower legs and torso, respectively. I think there's merit to your idea, which, though more technically complicated, also leaves much-needed room for interior robotic parts that are already competing for space in her sleek design.

    As for the model's scale generally, I chose 1:4 because, as you say, it provides more potential for functionality. (I can't recall a link at the moment, but I once saw a video on a miniature Ferrari (I think) that a machinist had crafted -- all the way down to actual firing pistons!) I'm hoping quarter-scale will be large enough to implement mechanisms that can be fashioned and worked on by hand, while still providing something small enough to be manipulated like a big toy. A supporting reason, which I hadn't considered at first, is that a matching Optimus Prime would just barely be able to stand upright in the average garage and would probably weigh nearly three hundred pounds -- it pushes the limit of what we can manipulate/pose without special tools.

    An acquaintance of mine recently suggested that I focus on taking a motorcycle design and making my own Arcee-like robot from it, rather than try to pigeon-hole Arcee's two forms into one potentially-flawed model. I'm not one for knock-offs, nor am I particularly creative on my own, so I doubt I would have success at that. In any case, I'm hooked on TFP Arcee and will have to learn the hard way (via dissecting game models) whether or not a near-perfect adaptation of her design is possible.
     
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  11. Snaku

    Snaku Well-Known Member

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    Sounds good. I must say you've set quite a challenge for yourself. I hope it goes well and we're eventually seeing your finished Arcee in Radicons. For that matter, I hope I get my gumption back and we see my finished Arcee in Radicons someday :p 
     

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