2D Artwork: TF Vexels

Discussion in 'Transformers Fan Art' started by dhugieboi, Nov 18, 2011.

  1. dhugieboi

    dhugieboi Well-Known Member

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    Bumblebee vexel art.

    [​IMG]
     

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  2. dhugieboi

    dhugieboi Well-Known Member

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    TF Prime: Cliffjumper Vexel

    [​IMG]
     
  3. MisterFanwank

    MisterFanwank Toy Industry Analyst

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    "Vexel?" What's that?

    I doubt you mean "voxel," because that was a 3D tech use back during the time of the Command and Conquer Red Alert games to only have to sprite a vehicle once, yet still be able to display it from any angle. Voxel art looks nothing like your artwork unless an obscene amount of effort is put into it.

    Regardless, very nice.
     
  4. dhugieboi

    dhugieboi Well-Known Member

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    Thanks. Yuyuyami

    re: Vexel

    Vexel
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Difference between a Vexel and a Vector. Both are created using Adobe Photoshop or a similar application with the pen tool although the vector is made using the shape layer function of the pen tool whereas the vexel is based on raster layers.

    Vexel is a neologism for an entirely pixel-based form of raster art that imitates the visual appearance of vector graphics technique (i.e. sharp-edged lines and areas of flat colour or smooth gradient fills). The word itself is a portmanteau derived from a combination of "vector" and "pixel."[1]

    Technique

    There is no one defined way to create a vexel,[2][3] however, one archetypal way to create a vexel[4] follows. Instead of using vector-based lines, shapes, and polygons to create an image, a vexel is typically created using a raster program's support for transparent layers. Each transparent layer is given a solid (or sometimes gradient[5]) shape and a display ordering that when displayed together with other near shape layers appears to create a stepped-but-gradual color transition. In some cases, for more realism, gradients are used that remove the stepping in the color transitions to create a smoother, photo-realistic image.

    The different nature of raster programs over a vector-plotted approach gives some vexel images a unique appearance when compared with traditional rasterized vector graphics, however, the increased flexibility comes with a loss of image scalability for print media, which is often a source of criticism.[citation needed] To compensate for this, most vexels are created at very high resolution.

    A vexel may even be composed using vector graphic techniques, however it becomes a vexel when the vector elements are rasterized and further manipulations to the image are done in raster. Sometimes true raster images are placed behind and/or in front of the original vector elements to emphasize the surrealism that the vector elements produce. A vexel is not essentially created with paintbrushes, airbrushes or a freehand tool such as pencil, although some may include these elements if they are not the primary medium. Ben Woolley says "[V]exels were originally meant to involve a vector technique, not any particular aesthetic style."[6]
    [edit] Style and appearance
    Vexels are commonly used to portray a sharpened look of a realistic object, such as a vehicle.

    Vexels are often characterized by crisp, clean color and lines (that look nearly vector-graphics style) but is entirely pixel-based, with a variety of color levels, from 2-color outlines to pseudo-realism.
     

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