Customs: Styrene Arm & Knee Joints

Discussion in 'Creative General Discussion' started by Jaicen, Mar 31, 2011.

  1. Jaicen

    Jaicen Well-Known Member

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    I'm just looking for a little insight into how well scratch built styrene joints hold up to use.
    I'm in the middle of a scratch project, (which looks like it will be awesome btw), that uses double knee joints made from solid styrene and styrene rod. At the minute, i've got the rod just pushed in, it's an exact fit to the hole, and makes a nice tight/stiff joint.
    However, i'm concerned that over time this will degrade and the joint will become floppy.
    Does anybody know wether this will be ok in the long run? The custom will be a display piece so it won't have any significant wear I would guess.
     
  2. Bigbot3030

    Bigbot3030 Well-Known Member

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    Styrene is pretty soft, i generally don't use it for joints like that. but if it's just a display piece and you could potentially take apart the joint later(to add some paint or nail polish to thicken up the area) then I don't think it will be an issue. But you have alot of other factors here. how big the thing is, how much weight it needs to hold, etc.
    Do you have a pic of the joint you're talking about?

    Randy!
     
  3. Fishdirt

    Fishdirt Tin Toy Transformer

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    It's not very rigid stuff and even paneling and walls get reinforced. Best bet is abs sheeting or using junker parts from various toys.
     
  4. Zildjian

    Zildjian Well-Known Member

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    What these guys said. My suggestion is to take an already existing ratchet joint from a transformer and model a larger one from that with ABS or THICK styrene. The ratcheting mechanism takes A LOT of the wear and tear away from the joint, and is 100x better than a friction type of joint.
     
  5. tabtiurf

    tabtiurf Chimeracon

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    Okay, I have a related query.

    I work in a sign shop and have been using scrap polystyrene sheeting from here for customs, including hip joints for an upcoming project. Is that stuff significantly different than modeling styrene? It certainly seems like it's more difficult to cut, based on the video tutorials I've seen.
     
  6. Bigbot3030

    Bigbot3030 Well-Known Member

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    I believe that stuff is significantly stronger than modeling styrene. thats what CD cases are made out of if i'm not mistaken.

    Keep in mind modeling styrene is softer for a reason, it's easier to work with. You don't need any special tools or power tools to cut or shape it. A good hobby knife and sandpaper is about it for tools.

    Randy!
     

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