Stress marks

Discussion in 'Transformers 3rd Party Discussion' started by MasterScale, Mar 18, 2017.

  1. MasterScale

    MasterScale Well-Known Member

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    So I recently got my first 3rd party figure, and while I love it, one of the transformation joints has a stress mark. And I've only transformed him from alt to bot twice.

    What I'm wondering is if stress marks mean the part will break soon, and how normal plastic stress is. I'm new to collecting, so pardon the stress. No pun intended. Really.

    *mods - I saw a thread about this same topic, but it was from 2012, and the last post was from 2015, so I figured that a new one was okay. Move this or let me know if it is an issue :) 
     
  2. Honesty

    Honesty honestly, Honesty!

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    Well, depending on the stress mark (how worn/stressed it is), you may be okay forever by just being a wee bit more careful the next times if you decide to transform again.

    If it is pretty worn, and the joint/piece/item is detachable (either by a screw or a ball joint), you can take the item off and use a hair dryer on it or use boiling water I hear. (Someone correct me if I am wrong please).

    EDIT: what figure is it, if you don't mind me asking?
     
  3. Devastator21

    Devastator21 Fanstoys zombie

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    what fig is it
     
  4. Snaku

    Snaku Well-Known Member

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    I'm pretty sure that heating to remove a stress mark doesn't heal the strength of the plastic. It just makes the mark go away.

    Unfortunately, I don't think there's enough information here to give you a real answer. A stress mark just shows that the plastic has been stretched. Though it is correct that a part that is about to break may show signs or stress, a stress mark doesn't necessarily indicate that a breakage is imminent. Some more brittle plastics may break with no stress marks at all while some more flexible plastics may mark and never break.
     
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  5. PrimalPrime007

    PrimalPrime007 Well-Known Member

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    adding pics of the figure and said stress marks would help.
     
  6. MasterScale

    MasterScale Well-Known Member

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    Toyworld's Brainwave (new). I'll post pics at some point, but for now: his shoulders pull out (away from his chest) when going from alt to bot, and the 'track' on which the joint slides is where the stress mark happened. Frankly, I didn't notice it until today, so *maybe* it was there before and I didn't notice?

    On a positive note, you can't see it unless you a) have the head off, and b) are really examining the figure from particular angles.

    This does help. Honestly, I ran a small tool over the mark, and I couldn't feel any change in the evenness of the plastic, so I'm guessing that is a good sign? Thank you!

    I plan on it. Thanks!
     
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  7. MasterScale

    MasterScale Well-Known Member

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    I was just looking at him again. I was transforming it as the instructions clearly said to, and I think what is happening is that when you (as I describe this, I realize you may or may not be familiar with the figure's transformation) fold his arms down, thusly turning his jet nose into his arms, I am guessing that the 't' joint that his shoulders slide out on is being pressed up into the track that holds that joint in place. And that's where I am presuming the stress is coming from.

    So to take your advice: "being a wee bit more careful the next time", I think I found an alternate move the arms back and forth. Thanks again :) 
     
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  8. boomerdave

    boomerdave Well-Known Member

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    Yeah a stress doesn't mean it's going to go soon, it just means...well...it got stressed. Excessive repetitive stressing will weaken the material over time of course.

    As others said, you can take a hair dryer to the stress mark and slowly heat it and it will go away. It's almost like magic :) 

    That said, it doesn't fix weakened plastic, just makes it look better but hey...something is better than nothing right?
     
  9. MasterScale

    MasterScale Well-Known Member

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    I tried taking pictures, but I don't think my camera is up to the task. The one blurry picture I got made the mark look like glare from the light. Thanks for all the responses, though - it helped with peace of mind :) 
     
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2017
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  10. theestampede

    theestampede Wandering Artist

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    be careful with the hair dryer if you use it, too much heat could cause it to melt or at least warp.

    also, I feel like I remember that line being kinda notorious for having stress marks, but I don't remember hearing much problems about breakage
     
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