Something that bothered me about Bumblebee.

Discussion in 'Transformers Movie Discussion' started by kenm2474, Jul 6, 2011.

  1. kenm2474

    kenm2474 LORD DC TFW2005 Supporter

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    I noticed this and it kind of bugged me was that he was a shiny brand new car but when he transformed he had dents and scratches all over his body. It was just odd how it happened is all. You saw the front part of the hood of the car and it was all shiny and new looking then he transformed and all of a sudden it was all scratched up and dented.
     
    Last edited: Jul 6, 2011
  2. MikeDiaz

    MikeDiaz Well-Known Member

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    Bee can toggle exterior damage on and off :) 
     
  3. Fishdirt

    Fishdirt Tin Toy Transformer

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    I'm pretty sure they just recycled alt models from the other movies. That would explain it for me. I don't have evidence as such but I don't see why they wouldn't to save money.
     
  4. Bottom Out

    Bottom Out Well-Known Member

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    the grundgy look translate to a more realistic depiction of the characters which is why they go that route. if you absolutely need an explanation just go with the metal stressing when it moves causing cracks and chips
     
  5. DecepticonsRule

    DecepticonsRule Triple-Changer

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    People have been talking about this since TF1.

    I think it's generally an assumed theory that when the robots are in alternate mode, there is some sort of "sheen" or hologram that coats the car vehicle, making it appear perfect. When they transform into robot mode, the sheen comes off, as it is no longer needed. Keep in mind, many of the Autobots scan these cars when they're in showroom condition, so the alternate mode SHOULDN'T have any scratches or dents in them, and that's part of the disguise.
    Remember when Bumblebee was the '76 Camaro, his exterior was beaten up, because that's what helped the him blend in best. If his '76 Camaro mode was sparkling brand new, it would attract more attention. It works the other way around too, a beaten up, dirty Corvette Centennial Stingray, it would look pretty suspicious.

    My point being, I'm sure the Transformers have many ways of camouflaging their alternate modes.
     
  6. The F.N.G.

    The F.N.G. Well-Known Member

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    That's the theory I go with. If they can create holographic drivers, I'm sure they can also create a holographic paintjob to make their alt-mode look great.
     
  7. smkspy

    smkspy is one nice fucking kitty

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    Why I agree with the sentient, the flip side is that if Autobots were truly concerned with disguising themselves, then they wouldn't have picked such flashy alternate modes to begin with. I mean, a lone brand new Camaro is going to attract some attention regardless, but add a hummer ambulance, the latest corvette, a suped-up pick-up truck, and a semi with a flame paint-job...well, that ain't exactly hiding lol.
     
  8. BMGFX

    BMGFX Awesome Spooner Veteran

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    I don't even think the whole holo-paint explanation is needed. I think it's more of the fact that a clean shiny car turning into a clean shiny cgi robot would make the robots stand out poorly in the environments they were in, regardless of how realistic it was. It would immediately register as being fake, so I would consider all of the dirt and scratches to be an exaggeration of sorts to make a 3d robot look more like it belongs in the scene.

    On the flip side, the companies who have their cars in the movies most likely wouldn't want their spotlight products to be shown with dents, scratches, and cracks on them. :) 
     
  9. Sonicpower451

    Sonicpower451 Well-Known Member

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    Another thing, I'm pretty sure everybody in the world probably knows who the Transformers are and their disguises. So, transforming would probably be pointless if their trying to blend in. Instead, it could be only used for extra speed.
     
  10. Opticron Primal

    Opticron Primal Comin' up OOOs!

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    Yeah, I mean a bright, dentless, perfect-looking Bumblebee standing around in a much more muted, realistic cityscape or battlefield will make him stand out in a bad way. A very "that's obviously fake" way.
     
  11. Bumblethumper

    Bumblethumper old misery guts

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    I think they should be able to make the robot look realistic without resorting to cheats like this, which I don't think it even helps as much as people seem to believe.

    Though one thing I'd like to see in a transformers movie is a battle-damaged bot transforming into a messed-up vehicle mode with misaligned parts. I'd just like to see what that would look like.
     
  12. SPLIT LIP

    SPLIT LIP Dry built

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    It's so that they don't look fake. It's a technical thing. That's like saying "why is everyone's teeth so white?" So they look better.
     
  13. The Madness

    The Madness News Credits: -13

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    Regardless of in-movie explanations; as BGMFX said, no car company wants their products looking worn and damaged, regardless of the beating it receives. I think it is easily forgivable considering it is probably contractual.

    Meanwhile, ILM wants to dirtmap and weather as much as possible to add a degree of faux realism to their models.

    Neither side can really compromise, from a production standpoint.
     

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