So I wanna buy an HDTV...

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by MegaMoonMan, Sep 20, 2006.

  1. MegaMoonMan

    MegaMoonMan www.megamoonman.com TFW2005 Supporter

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    but I'm confused as hell as to what kind to get, and with what features. I want to get the most for my money, not spend a ton, and only pay for features I'll use. 1080i/p? No idea what the difference is, or which I'll need. I'll be using it for watching normal tv, normal DVDs (for now), and playing console games.

    I think that a slim-line CRT HDTV would have the best picture quality, and be cheaper than LCD or plasma, but I heard these may have resolution issues?

    What kinds of inputs should I look for? Composite, HDMI? Which will give me the best picture quality and not break the bank?

    Are there any sites out there that explain all this?
     
  2. Shaun_C

    Shaun_C The REAL One True fan Veteran TFW2005 Supporter

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    Would this site have the info you want?
     
  3. Joe Moore

    Joe Moore Is Not Jim... Administrator

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    480i - Means 480 interlaced pixels per square inch (I believe it's per square inch). Which is the output of a standard CRT tv. It's an upconversion from 240 pixels

    480p - Means 480 deadicated pixels and no interlacing of those pixels.

    720p - Is 720 deadicated pixels per square inch. It's the high quality display display for most HDTV's. And HD Signals are broadcast in 720p.

    1080i - Is 180 interlaced pixels per square inch. The signal or source of 720p is upconverted and interlaced to produce/mimmick a 1080 pixel resolution. Many 720p HDTV's have this ability.

    1080p - Is the highest of the high quality. 1080 dedicated pixels per square inch. These HDTV's are very expensive.
     
  4. MegaMoonMan

    MegaMoonMan www.megamoonman.com TFW2005 Supporter

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    That's the stuff I need to know, guys. Thanks!
     
  5. Deszaras

    Deszaras In the next episode...

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    Jay,

    Flat CRT TVs offer the best, IMHO, resolution.. but their only drawback is the weight.
    The suckers weigh a ton!!

    I looked around for an HDTV for a long time (almost a year) and bought a 62 inch DLP TV first.. tried it for a week and did not like it at all.. movies ended up being so grainy on it that I returned it and ended up with a plasma.. i haven't looked back since.

    I'd probably recommend waiting because a new HD standard is just around the corner that is threatening to make the current generation obsolete..

    I'll post links, if I can find some, regarding this.
     
  6. Joe Moore

    Joe Moore Is Not Jim... Administrator

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    Also, I just bought an HDTV last month. I did a lot of research. Read reviews, etc. I bought a Samsung DLP. I went with DLP for a few reasons, even though I really wanted a Plasma. However, reading about the problems with Plasma's and LCD's changed my view. First off, since Plasma's and LCD's use pixel displays, they have a tendency to have static images burned (or ghosted) into the screen. Especially if you usually watch a channel that displays an opaque logo. Many lower priced plasma's still suffer the "river" effect where some of the plasma will slowly move to the bottom of your screen and create a river effect. Something I have seen at stores that have had Plasma's out for awhile. LCD's didn't do anything for me at all.

    I went with DLP because there is no worry about burning images because of the way it projects the image. The picture quality was pretty astounding and the value was great.

    Also, be aware, you will likely need to upgrade some of your hardware and cables. If you play videogames on it (Xbox and PS2) you will need to purchase a component cable so they will display without screen blur and will look worlds better. Also, if you have an old DVD player you may want to upgrade that can upconvert your existing DVD's. I bought one for $78 and love it.
     
  7. BowB4Prime

    BowB4Prime arse dimples

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    i myself cannot find the links, but if you use cable and satelite you will be exempt from the obsolete for a few years, they are mainly targetting antenna users, and normal programs....im searching, and should be back
     
  8. godsenddeath

    godsenddeath . TFW2005 Supporter

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    HDMI isn't crucial, but unlike it's predecessor DVI, it carries handles audio as well as video.


    1080P Tvs are a lot more pricey than 1080I TVs, and unless you're right smack up against the screen, it's going to be very hard to notice any improvement over 1080I. On top of which, it's going to be a long time before 1080P programming is common place due to size limitations.

    As for the Plasma VS LCD debate;

    Plasma screens tend to have a better contrast ratio. They do better at displaying extremly dark parts of an image without altering the lighter parts of the image.

    However, some Plasma screens tend to fade over time, where as LCD screens don't.

    As for speciffic brands. It's generally argued that Samsung make the best LCDs and Panasonic the best Plasma screens.
     
  9. MegaMoonMan

    MegaMoonMan www.megamoonman.com TFW2005 Supporter

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    I was looking at a slim-line 30"(or so) CRT model, they say the slim-line tubes weigh 30% less than the same sized normal tube...I'm thinking that in order to save some money and get the best picture quality, I can deal with some weight. Besides, I'm not looking for a HUGE tv, just one somewhere in the 30"-36" range.
     
  10. Altercron

    Altercron Well-Known Member

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    a buddy of mine bought an HDTV about two weeks ago. Gave $1500 bucks for the thing and it's smaller than my conventional 26" tv that I got at Wal mart for $230. I just couldn't sleep at night knowing that I gave as much as I gave for my first car for a TV.
     
  11. Mad Dawg

    Mad Dawg Autobot Brewmeister

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    Sharp LC-37D90u for $1599

    It's probably bigger than any CRT HDTV you could be looking at since I think the largest size there is 34", and it's an LCD panel so it will look sexy and weigh less.

    It's got 2xHDMI and 1xDVI, and it will accept 1080p with 1:1 pixel mapping and no overscan on all three of them. Makes a great Home Theater PC monitor.

    It's got great black levels, especially for an LCD, and does a great job rendering SD television which will still be most of your viewing for some time to come.

    The speakers at bottom are removable, which is great if you just want the screen and rely on an external audio system like most HT enthusiasts do these days.

    Looks just as good as the latest and far more expensive Samsung and Sony 1080p models, and is of a reputable brand unlike a lot of other budget LCD's.

    Seriously, I've talked several friends into this model and am looking to get one myself this Christmas. This television is pretty well future-proof. Will accept the 1080p signal from a PC, HD-DVD/Blu-Ray and/or PlayStation3. It will be a very long time (if ever) before the broadcasters start broadcasting 1080p content, let alone something even better (so-called Ultra HD), and if/when they ever do you will be ready for it. The only things coming down the pipe that would maybe slow my clicking the buy button are the coming LED-backlit panels, 120Hz refresh rate panels and HDMI 1.3 compliancy. However, since HDMI 1.3 is backward-compatible with HDMI 1.2 and since I intend to upgrade my living room again (with a larger screen) at which time I will move this one to the bedroom, it's good enough for me. That's saying something, because I am DAMN picky when making technology purchases.

    Only problem is if you have a lot of older devices, you might be disappointed with this model. Only one shared S-Video/Composite input. Time to retire the VCR and your old video game consoles. Get component cables for your GameCube, X-Box, X-Box 360 or PlayStation 2, because some users have reported problems hooking video game consoles up to S-video and you should be taking advantage of those systems' component output capabilities anyway. It makes a big difference in image quality.
     
  12. Mad Dawg

    Mad Dawg Autobot Brewmeister

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    You will NOT be getting the best picture quality with a slim-line tube. Compared to a normal tube they suck. I would rather have a no-name, budget LCD panel than a slim-line tube any day of the week. Even with backlight bleeding and a few (< 5) stuck pixels an LCD panel would look better.
     
  13. Gears

    Gears buh-buh-body ya Veteran

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    Out of all the TVs I would say get a Flat-panel Samsung LCD. They have great colors and contrast compared to other brands. A CRT will be nowhere near as sharp, and a DLP won't look as good and you're gonna have to fork out about $250 every 4000 or so hours to change the lamp inside it when it dies. Plasma's still have burn-in issues so yeah, I'd go with a flat panel LCD.
     
  14. Mad Dawg

    Mad Dawg Autobot Brewmeister

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    It's going to start sounding like I work for Sharp (I don't, I work for Cisco Systems), but the Sharp LC-37D90u really does look just as good as the Samsungs you've probably seen, maybe even better. Definitely looks better with SD content.


    A good CRT can be just as sharp, but CRT is not inherently progressive like an LCD or a plasma. Still, I'd put a really good CRT (or even a properly calibrated CRT rear-projection with 9" guns) up against any flat panel any day.

    As far as DLP not looking as good, that's a very subjective remark. DLP can look VERY good, especially if properly calibrated. They're also extremely bright, which some people like. In the end it's all about your own personal viewing experience, so maybe you've never had a good one with DLP. I have, and I can tell you that it is just as competitive as any other technology on the market right now. Unfortunately the Xenon lamps can be a problem, though they last (on average) longer than you quoted and have come down in price considerably ($200-$300). They do still get very hot, requiring noisy fans to cool the components. Plasma and LCD panels typically have fans, too, but microdisplay rear projection sets like DLP, LCD and LCoS are notorious for their noisy air-movers. LED lamps are slated to replace the Xenon ones, and this should solve most issues.

    Plasma has a very bad reputation for burn-in and life expectancy, both of which have not been well-deserved since about the third or fourth generation of plasma technology (most major mfg's are currently on eighth gen). Plasma technology has gone a long way in preventing burn-in, and is now at least as good as CRT technology which also has burn-in. Plasma may even be better. As far as life expectancy, plasmas are now rated beyond 60,000 hours. You could watch 8 hours of television per day for 20 years at that rate. I don't know about you all, but I feel like I've wasted the day if I spend more than 3 hours in front of a television in a given day.

    The only thing that should concern you about plasma is whether or not you live at higher elevation. Even that is being improved upon, as many plasmas are now rated to run perfectly at 7000+ feet. Denver residents rejoice!
     
  15. MegaMoonMan

    MegaMoonMan www.megamoonman.com TFW2005 Supporter

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    I was worried about getting a plasma or LCD TV mostly because I've heard that they can have "motion blur". Is this still a problem? Can the newer models keep up with fast moving pictures?
     
  16. artiepants

    artiepants Just over here punching Unicron.

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    I'm intriuged ~ do the make a bigger model? i'm currently finsihing up my basement to be a bit of a "media room" and have the wall space for a 50-60" flat panel...
    edit, found them on that site ~ the 45" is intriuging, the price jump to 50 is not :p 
     
  17. Mad Dawg

    Mad Dawg Autobot Brewmeister

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    Motion blur has never really been a problem with plasma, and most current generation LCD's have 6-8 millisecond response times. I'm thinking that the coming of 120Hz refresh rate LCD panels will solve this issue forever, but even as of right now I would challenge you to find obvious examples of motion blurring with current models.
     
  18. Mad Dawg

    Mad Dawg Autobot Brewmeister

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    When will your basement be finished? Sometime this Fall (read as "in time for Christmas") Sharp should be introducing their D62 lineup consisting of 42", 46" and 52" models. I recommend against the 42" model based on the unknown origin of the glass, but the other two panels are manufactured at Sharp's next-generation Kameyama 2 facility, same as the LC-37D90u I mentioned above.

    Anyway, here are some specs that were previously posted over at the AVS Forums...

    LC-46D62U (46-inch) and LC-52D62U (52-inch)
    Resolution: 1920x1080
    Panel source: Kameyama No. 2 plant, Japan
    Assembly: Rosarito, Mexico
    4-wavelength backlight
    Contrast ratio: 2000:1 "native," 10,000:1 dynamic
    Viewing angle: 176 degrees
    Response time: 4 ms in "Fine Motion Mode"; otherwise 6 ms
    Tuners: ATSC, NTSC, QAM (No CableCard)
    Inputs: HDMI (2, 1080p-capable), component (2), S-Video (1), composite (3)
    Cabinet: Piano (gloss) black
    Built-in speakers: 15 watts per channel
    Available: October 2006
    MSRP: $3,500 (46-inch), $4,800 (52-inch)

    LC-42D62U (42-inch)
    Resolution: 1920x1080
    Panel source: Unknown
    Assembly: Rosarito, Mexico
    3-wavelength backlight
    Contrast ratio: 1200:1 "native"; 6000:1 dynamic
    Viewing angle: 176 degrees
    Response time: 6 ms
    Tuners: ATSC, NTSC, QAM (No CableCard)
    Inputs: HDMI (2, 1080p-capable), component (2), S-Video (1), composite (3)
    Cabinet: Piano (gloss) black
    Built-in speakers: 10 watts per channel
    Available: October 2006
    MSRP: $2,500

    Some answers to frequently asked D62 questions (thanks Mike53):
    -- HDMI is version 1.2 and allows digital PC interface. HDMI 1.3 will be coming in 2007.
    -- Supports 1:1 pixel mapping (dot by dot)

    I suspect there will be a D92u line as well (successor to the D90u line, and as such possibly with removable speakers and a PC-input), but I would be speculating.
     
  19. RabidYak

    RabidYak Go Ninja Go Ninja Go

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    One thing to look out for is the sound provision, LCDs and Plasmas only tend to have two speakers driven by either standard stereo or Virtual Dolby. You probably wont know the difference if thats what you've currently got, but it'll sound like crap if your current TV has proper sorround and you'll need to invest in an external system to make up for it.

    HDMI is the input of the future and theres no real excuse for buying a TV without it thesedays since all decent models have it. If you have to slum with an older or cheaper model that doesent have it, at least make sure that its got a HDCP-enabled DVI input so you won't be screwed if the studios ever decide to use ICT on thier HD discs.
     
  20. Gigatron_2005

    Gigatron_2005 President of Calendars

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    Here is my oppinion on HDTVs:

    First off, I like LCD. Today's models look outstanding, and I dont notice any motion blur at all. I choose LCD over DLP because on a DLP TV, I hear of people seeing the "rainbow effect" on single chip DLPs. (and its fun to get people to see these on their new systems :D :p :ev: ) I stay away from plasma because in the past, I know people who have had the TVs go bad on them quite quickly. The only reason I wouldnt go for the CRTs is because of the weight of the damn things.

    Higher contrast is always better but off the top of my head, I cant really tell the diference between anything thats about 2500:1(I think thats the right number) or higher.

    Remember that the in-store brightness is most likely not what you want in your home. The lighting conditions are different, so take that into consideration.

    Also, I dont see too much of an advantage with 1080p. At normal viewing distance, they both looked the same to me. So it wouldnt hurt to go for a 720p native IMO.

    Also, I would go for HDMI. Simply so you dont get screwed by the movie studios in the future if they enable the copy protection on the next gen dvds.
     

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