So, how do we control them? (gaming question)

Discussion in 'Video Games and Technology' started by DaggersRage, Feb 17, 2009.

  1. DaggersRage

    DaggersRage Autistic bastard.

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    So, I've been thinking about this and when I play video games, there's two ways I see at how the player has control. One is taking direct control and being the character (FPS', the tetris blocks, platformers). The second way I see it is by telling or "talking" to the character (Strategy games, menu based RPGs, some puzzle games).

    Few things just wondering about, would game designers think the same way like that, and is there maybe more ways to take control in video games?
     
  2. Red Alert

    Red Alert Security

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    Full VR maybe.
     
  3. Scourge_151

    Scourge_151 Dangerous when naked! TFW2005 Supporter

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    Until we progress to something like full VR, as tamo said, or even something directly cerebral, we'll have to make do with the methods we have now.
    More specialised controllers do make the games seem a lot closer to the real thing, such as force feedback steering wheels and joysticks for simulators, or using your wiimote as a sword or golf club. However, there still lacks the sense of actual movement or interaction that you would get in real situations.
    Even in VR this would be the limit. A true cerebral interface could make the game feel 'real' to us, and then we would be the character we were trying to control, as opposed to issuing commands to them, pushing a button to make a character climb, reload or grab something.
    I think the 'disconnection', for want of a better word, that we have from the game world with controllers is important though, even in VR you would know it was a game, as otherwise a person may be tempted to never wish to leave, or lose connection with the real world totally. Imagine the problem that some have now with being addicted to games like Wow multiplied by them being actually in the game.
     
  4. DaggersRage

    DaggersRage Autistic bastard.

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    Maybe, but the way I'm looking at it, even with VR gameplay, we're still taking control of the character. The cerebrial idea though could twist things around where the player actualy is the character, for as long as the game is running, or we get the "bleeding effect" (Assassins Creed reference) and the two conscience's merge and we get wannabe ninjas.....
     
  5. Prowl

    Prowl Well-Known Member

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    Even though it's basically the same premise, there was that one PS2 game where you literally spoke to the character, but that has a long way to go.
     
  6. samtheman

    samtheman Well-Known Member

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    You should read into methods of story telling in literature. There really isn't anything different. First person is to shooter as third person is to RPG or platform. There is already a limited number of perspectives a story can be told in or in this instance, a video game.

    I guess the best you can do is blend different perspectives together or find a new way to use one of the perspectives.
     

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