Customs: sculpey head modding - advice needed

Discussion in 'Creative General Discussion' started by kjeevahh, Feb 13, 2011.

  1. kjeevahh

    kjeevahh n/a

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    Going to give this a try, starting with an existing TF head and adding on some more details.

    The sculpey needs baking though, what's the best way of going about this? trying to remove the little pieces, bake them, then gkue back on again? or can the plastic on teh original head handle being baked without melting?
     
  2. grimlockprime

    grimlockprime Well-Known Member

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    can't bake it.it'll melt.you could try boiling it but i use aves fixit sculpt which airdries
     
  3. Bigbot3030

    Bigbot3030 Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, you can't bake it on the head. I've seen some people use a heat gun to bake it, but that is succesful becasue they then mold and cast the part.
    I'd try removing the pieces, baking them, then gluing them back on. you don't have anything to lose right now.
    But what kind of paints are you using? Scuply is weird with enamels, even if you use some good krylon primer, it can still feel "tacky" for a long time. Acrylics are okay.

    But in the future you should invest in a epoxy putty. the fixit scuplt is okay, but I have had awesome results with magic scuplt made by wesco enterprises. You can sculpt stuff, then smooth out the surface with water. best stuff i've used. and i'm not a big fan of milliput. It has its uses, just not for what I want to do with it.
    Good luck.

    Randy!
     
  4. Fishdirt

    Fishdirt Tin Toy Transformer

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    Bake it. In vinyl toys they bake it or use a heat gun. With baking you should do it in couple minute increments. Take it out every couple minutes and put back in, watch the head plastic. A heat gun is just a more controlled way to do the same thing.

    Sculpey shrinks so definitely keep it on head.

    Epoxy putty is great but wear gloves. It actually gets into the body through contact before it's cured. This has been known to cause nerve damage on fingers causing a desensitization.

    Though I haven't tried it a dehydrator sounds like a safe way to cure the sculpey as well.
     
  5. Superquad7

    Superquad7 We're only human. Super Mod

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    Wow, that's pretty enlightening. Do you have any links to any such reports? I'd be interested in reading more.
     
  6. Fishdirt

    Fishdirt Tin Toy Transformer

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    It's pretty common knowledge in the vinyl toy community but I'll look it up if I can find the links.
     
  7. Fishdirt

    Fishdirt Tin Toy Transformer

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    A clip from a post elsewhere:

    "epoxy putty (including Milliput, Apoxie, and Magic Sculpt) - used for the armature, and sometimes for sculpting heads, etc. Epoxy putty is basically epoxy resin mixed with talc. With enough exposure over time, all people develop a sensitivity, which involves (minimally) a nasty rash. Over time, epoxy putties can cause nerve death in the fingers. Neither latex nor vinyl gloves are fully protective; nitrile gloves are recommended. "

    then there is the MSDS (everyone should look up the msds of any materials they use. I learned this from years of working in factories).

    http://www.afpollution.com/downloads/msds_epoxy.pdf
     
  8. aprim

    aprim Well-Known Member

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    wow, I always use gloves to mix, but I use my fingers to sculpt..this isnt good news.
     
  9. Fishdirt

    Fishdirt Tin Toy Transformer

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    It's from long term use. I wouldn't worry much but I'd use gloves.
     
  10. Superquad7

    Superquad7 We're only human. Super Mod

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    Ah, thanks so much for that! That's really informative.

    For myself, I don't use epoxy all that much (at least not presently), and I've ALWAYS washed my hands thereafter. I don't have OCD, but I've always been notorious for washing my hands (I probably do this 15-20 times a day).

    Knowledge is certainly a from of power, and this simply better equips us as artists to take any necessary precautions. :thumb 
     
  11. kjeevahh

    kjeevahh n/a

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    hmm i need to do a fair bit of sculpting over hte next month, need to mod some full size helmets, so need to buy something new anyway.. so it looks like the best idea is to forget about the sculpey and get some epoxy instead? any recommendations for a brand?
     
  12. encline

    encline customizer of love TFW2005 Supporter

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    wow..this thread has been helpful.....now more reasons to buy gloves:) 
     
  13. kjeevahh

    kjeevahh n/a

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    magic sculpt.. how does that water thing work? is that just before it dries? reason being i have to make some waterproof stuff with it.
     
  14. Ramrider

    Ramrider TF Art Lad

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    Yeah, that'll be while it's curing; water helps stop the putty from sticking to tools and fingers, and you'll generally find that if you want to get a nice smooth surface, it's best to wait till you've done all the actual sculpting, and before it's cured too far, you can wet a finger or similar and gently rub it over the surface of the model.

    What sort of "waterproof stuff" are you aiming to make? I don't know about Magic Sculpt, but I know Milliput is waterproof; I've even used it to make emergency repairs to a boiler! I'd still recommend a coat or two of sealant if you want it to be totally watertight, though.
     
  15. Bigbot3030

    Bigbot3030 Well-Known Member

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    ^ ramrider got it. it's just to help smooth out the parts. Alot of times it's just to remove my fingerprints.

    if you want something waterproof, the milliput is one asnwer, but plumbers epoxy putty should work pretty well. it just kicks alot faster than the scuplting putties, but i've used it before and buitl up things in stages and it worked pretty well.

    Although, isn't ALL epoxy putty waterproof after it cures?

    Randy!
     
  16. kjeevahh

    kjeevahh n/a

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    its making some helmets for people to wear as costumes, but there's a fair chance that it will tip down with rain while they're wearing them (english summer weather)
     

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