Customs: Sanding

Discussion in 'Creative General Discussion' started by kneero, Oct 24, 2011.

  1. kneero

    kneero Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2011
    Posts:
    53
    Trophy Points:
    57
    Likes:
    +1
    sorry if this is a double post, but I can't get the search function to work on my tablet (my rough life). Anyway, I'm wondering how to get my sanding smooth. As in no scratch marks visible. Thanks in advance for the help.
     
  2. Bigbot3030

    Bigbot3030 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2007
    Posts:
    2,221
    Trophy Points:
    207
    Likes:
    +1
    Finer sandpaper. And i'm not bing a jerk, but that really is the trick. You start out with a rougher (but not rough like 60 grit or anything, it depends on what you are sanding, I usually start around 120)paper then work your way to the real fine stuff without skipping a bunch of grits inbetween. Don't go from 120 to 400 for example. And for the super fine finishes, wet sand.

    Randy!
     
  3. kneero

    kneero Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2011
    Posts:
    53
    Trophy Points:
    57
    Likes:
    +1
    Thanks. I think i'm at 160 then my next step is 400. Off to wally world.
     
  4. OMEGAPRIME1983

    OMEGAPRIME1983 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2005
    Posts:
    12,831
    News Credits:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    312
    Likes:
    +631
    Ebay:
    NO!Lol, 120, 140, 160, 180, 200 and so on, sorry but you need to go one after another and not skip any... NONE. Otherwise it's not going to work properly.
     
  5. hthrun

    hthrun Show accuracy's overrated

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2011
    Posts:
    4,881
    Trophy Points:
    172
    Likes:
    +12
    Ebay:
    I just finished painting DotM Sideswipe silver. This is the first time I painted an entire toy. I'm pretty happy with it, but I'm wondering if I can smoothen the paint down better by sanding it a little. Or is that a bad idea?
     
  6. Quantum25

    Quantum25 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2011
    Posts:
    2,141
    Trophy Points:
    187
    Likes:
    +54
    Also if you really want an extremely smooth finish, you may want to follow Bigbot3030's advice and go with wet sanding (possibly 1000 to 1200 grit, and yes it can go much higher), after normal sanding with lower grits of course.

    You could also try looking in the tutorial section for additional help, that's where I got most of my help from.
    Hope this helps and good luck on your project.
     
  7. Quantum25

    Quantum25 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2011
    Posts:
    2,141
    Trophy Points:
    187
    Likes:
    +54
    As long as you wet sand it with a fine grit, I don't see any problem with it.
    Though you should probably wait for someone else's opinion just in case.
     
  8. hXcpunk23

    hXcpunk23 The Chaos Bringer

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2007
    Posts:
    3,021
    Trophy Points:
    172
    Likes:
    +2
    Ebay:
    Sanding will smooth any areas where the paint may have gone on too thick and help smooth any imperfections. After doing that, you would need to cover that area again with thin layers of silver to patch the area you sanded and help it blend in smoothly with the rest of the paint.
     
  9. Bigbot3030

    Bigbot3030 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2007
    Posts:
    2,221
    Trophy Points:
    207
    Likes:
    +1
    yeah..i guess i wasn't clear enough?!? :lol 

    Yes, wet sanding will smooth it down and take out any dust specks and other imperfections. you have to be very careful though or otherwise you'll go through your paint layer.
    I guess I should elaborate that usually when you wet sand you will then go and put anouther coat of paint on. it may sound like alot of work, but your not going to get a perfect surface (which you pretty much need for things like silver) any other way. there are polishing kits for models (don't use car polishing kits) but that's just further polishes the existing surface.

    I'd say a good thing to keep in mind is that paint will never hide imperfections, it always seems to bring them out more. Thats why you don't skip grits of sandpaper. you have to continue to smooth it out. unfortuantly, there aren't alot of shortcuts when it comes to paint prep. you really have to spend your time on it.

    Randy!
     
  10. kneero

    kneero Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2011
    Posts:
    53
    Trophy Points:
    57
    Likes:
    +1
    No no, I meant that is all I have. I'll be picking up the intermediate grades.
     
  11. Bigbot3030

    Bigbot3030 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2007
    Posts:
    2,221
    Trophy Points:
    207
    Likes:
    +1
    Got it, and good luck! :thumb 

    R!
     
  12. hthrun

    hthrun Show accuracy's overrated

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2011
    Posts:
    4,881
    Trophy Points:
    172
    Likes:
    +12
    Ebay:
    Thanks guys! I just posted pics in the Radicon section here and attached a couple close-ups to this post.
    I used Testors acrylic gloss silver from their base set and mixed in Future. Is this about the best I can expect with a brush and that type of paint? Or would it be worth it to try sanding it down?

    Also, just to be sure, what exactly is wet sanding? Is it simply wetting your sandpaper with water before using it? Or is there a special kind of sandpaper?
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Oct 27, 2011
  13. Quantum25

    Quantum25 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2011
    Posts:
    2,141
    Trophy Points:
    187
    Likes:
    +54
    It's pretty much wetting sandpaper before you use it, but you would generally use a much finer grit, probably 1000 grit or more.
    Hope this helps.
     
  14. hthrun

    hthrun Show accuracy's overrated

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2011
    Posts:
    4,881
    Trophy Points:
    172
    Likes:
    +12
    Ebay:
    Yep, it does, thanks! I think I'll just leave my Sideswipe as is...
     
  15. OMEGAPRIME1983

    OMEGAPRIME1983 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2005
    Posts:
    12,831
    News Credits:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    312
    Likes:
    +631
    Ebay:
    hthrun, just to be clear, as part of your question wasn't really touched on, wet sanding uses a special type of paper bro. You can get it at auto parts stores and maybe Walmart, but you can't use typical paper for this process. If you are going to use the Testor's paper, those are good for wet sanding as well, but you are probably better offer going to the auto parts stores to try and get it from there, as you will get more of it for not much more money.
     
  16. Superquad7

    Superquad7 We're only human. Super Mod

    Joined:
    May 19, 2003
    Posts:
    48,104
    News Credits:
    11
    Trophy Points:
    397
    Likes:
    +263
    I can certainly appreciate your insight here, but I've used the Testors paper to wet-sand for years with satisfactory results.
     
  17. Bigbot3030

    Bigbot3030 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2007
    Posts:
    2,221
    Trophy Points:
    207
    Likes:
    +1
    really the only difference in "wet sand paper" is that the grit is bonded to a cloth backing, instead of paper. You can use regular sand paper to wet sand, the paper just gets soggy after time. Why that might be helpful in the long run is that, since you're wet sanding, a single piece of sandpaper lasts longer since it doens't clog up (becasue the water washes it away). Just buy cheap for now, try it out, then when you can buy the more expensive stuff (the cloth backed) and see what you like. personally, I like the cloth backed, but it really doesnt' matter.
    R!
     

Share This Page