Customs: Safest way to push pins/rivets in further?

Discussion in 'Creative General Discussion' started by netkid, Aug 27, 2012.

  1. netkid

    netkid Where's my Goddamn shoe!

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    Whats the safest way to push pins/rivets in further?

    I have a red Wal-Mart Universe 2.0 Powerglide that I am trying to fix.

    Basically, if you look behind each of the big red wings where the white plastic hinge attaches to the pivot rod, you will see a circular hole where a circular rivet sits in (pic#1). The rivets on mine are sticking out too far, so they put extra stress on this pivot and scrap the red plastic wing from behind.

    The round rivet in each of the white hinge sections are internally attached to a black plastic "cup" shaped cylinder thingy (pic#3). I basically need to push each rivet into the cup shaped cylinder thingy so they don't poke out of their circular resting holes and no longer scrape the red wings to stress the white hinge.

    Also, because the rivets are not fully in the black cup shaped cylinder thingy, they make a big wobbly gap (pic#2) that seems very unstable and could possibly damage the joint from transformation.

    ...if any of that just made sense.

    PIC#1
    [​IMG]

    PIC #2
    [​IMG]

    PIC #3
    [​IMG]
     
  2. hXcpunk23

    hXcpunk23 The Chaos Bringer

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    Not sure if it's considered "safe", as it deals with very high heat.......but I've used a small soldering iron to heat the pin (30-40 seconds), then push in on the pin slightly. It usually goes in like a hot knife through butter & once you let it set & cool again, it's good to go.
     
  3. Megatron31

    Megatron31 I Belong to Nobody!

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    ^this best way i have found of doing it

    but will say as a caution you need to have a steady hand if the tip of the soldering iron slips of the metal and onto the plastic there is a chance of it getting deformed or scared.
    especially if the iron is up to full temp
     
  4. plowking

    plowking I'm with ErechOveraker. Veteran

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    If you've used a soldering iron before, then I'd say go for the method HXC listed above. Just be very careful....as M-31 said, you can deform the plastic.

    if not:

    Get yourself a nice flat tipped punch, and a hammer. Place the part in question on a block of wood or something of the like. You want to support the piece, yet provide a surface "soft" enough to prevent severe marring of the parts, that's what the wood is for.

    Lightly tap the head of the pin, and check for movement....if there is none, then you may have to give it a good wack or two to get it going....but like I said, do it lightly at first. You dont wanna knock the pin in too far causing more damage.

    Once you get movement on the pin, just give it a few taps until you are satisfied with it....you know, not too loose, not too tight.
     

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