Customs: Rubbing Compound advice?

Discussion in 'Creative General Discussion' started by Computer5, Aug 17, 2011.

  1. Computer5

    Computer5 Well-Known Member

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    Hey Guys,

    Has anyone tried using Turtle Wax Rubbing Compound on TFs? It looks like it works pretty well on car scratches. But i am wondering if this would be safe on Tfs.

    turtlewax rubbing compound - YouTube
     
  2. Budokhan

    Budokhan Wheeljack's apprentice

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    Hey C5!

    Well, I don't know about turtle wax tho I'd assume it'd be okay. Many years ago I used to do alot of spray paint work in the toy industry & one of the companies I worked for had the "Franklin Mint" as a client. We made numerous, painted, photo masters for their die-cast cars. At the end of the paint work, we used a product called "Simichrome" to really polish out the car bodies' clear-coat & then followed that up by an application of "Meguiar's Show car glaze" . I've used this combo before on bare plastic model car bodies & achieved the exact same results. Lemme tell ya, these two in tandem never failed to give a mirror finish!

    You can ( I'm happy to see) still get this stuff & I very highly recommend them both!
    Amazon.com: SIMICHROME SIMICROME POLISH-TUBE 390050: Everything Else

    MeguiarsDirect.com: Show Car Glaze

    Hope that helps a bit! :D 

    Cheers!
    ~BK
     
  3. OMEGAPRIME1983

    OMEGAPRIME1983 Well-Known Member

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    I use turtle wax car wax on them and it makes them all shiny and perdy :D 
     
  4. jason jupiter

    jason jupiter weird/ rare g1 KO hunter

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    the problem is cars have a large smooth surface and tf toys are filled with details that are extruding and cut-in.

    any kind of rubbing compound (liquid base with tiny, tiny granules, you are basically sanding with a super high grit sandpaper to get it shiny) is going to get stuck in those little cracks and extrusions.

    if you just want to polish up some of the larger surfaces and clean out all the gunk you are looking for any rubbing compound and spray on glaze. there's a bunch of different brands you can choose from at retailers.
     
  5. Computer5

    Computer5 Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the advice guys, i am gonna have to experiment. I'm basically trying to "buff out" any factory defect scratches because i am having a hard time color matching some figures.
     

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