Customs: Questions on sanding

Discussion in 'Creative General Discussion' started by khopson, Sep 8, 2011.

  1. khopson

    khopson Well-Known Member

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    I've looked over the tutorials, but I still have questions, and I would be interested in what people have to say about this. I know you can use an alcohol bath to peel off factory paints (might be the easiest method), but how many of you sand instead, especially with larger figures? Also, what grit do you use for initial sanding? I know 1000 grit is used to wet-sand paint prior to finishing it, but I'm assuming a rougher sand paper would be needed prior to priming. I'd appreciate thoughts on this. Thanks.
     
  2. Saberfrost01

    Saberfrost01 元ロボ ダイユーシャ

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    I'm with you with still having questions mate. Just never had the courage to ask myself.
     
  3. Satomiblood

    Satomiblood Prototype Black

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    You only really want to sand spots on a figure where paint rub may occur, or if you want to even out surfaces and remove any unwanted bumps. Wet sanding is less abrasive, but that helps prevent or lessen the marks left from dry sanding with a tougher grit. I would never sand to remove factory paint, though. I'd much rather use rubbing alcohol or thinner.
     
  4. khopson

    khopson Well-Known Member

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    Thanks. I appreciate the insight.
     
  5. Zildjian

    Zildjian Well-Known Member

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    I do both.... I strip factory paint and sand most of the figure. I use a 400-800 grit sanding pad and just make the surface scuffed.
     
  6. khopson

    khopson Well-Known Member

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    Got it. So, you strip the paint first and then sand. I guess sanding from the start is a no-no, which makes sense. Thanks.
     
  7. OMEGAPRIME1983

    OMEGAPRIME1983 Well-Known Member

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    sanding from the start isn't really a no-no.. Sanding will do what the alcohol bath does. If you want to get really creative, wet sand with alcohol, and kill both birds with one stone. I typically sand the pieces I am painting with a grit around 120 to 150 to give the paint something to grab onto. You don't want to go to much finer than the 150 though because it'll just polish the surface, and you're back to square one again. The paint will then be a bit more durable because it's got a better grasp of the material you're painting rather than just laying over it. I usually cut grooves into each end of either piece I am gluing together for the same reasoning lately. Makes for a better hold of the joint.
     
  8. Master Blaster

    Master Blaster Banned

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    I've sanded to remove paint before, but only on things I'm reshaping slightly anyway. If you can get it off with alcohol, you're probably better off doing so.


    I've also a question regarding sanding if anyone can help, since we're already here. I generally use fine files for my sanding, but I'd like to get a more polished finish. I assume this is done with a finer grade grit? How fine a grit of sandpaper sho/uld be used for layers that'll be either painted/unpainted (the top layer you'll see, I mean)
     
  9. OMEGAPRIME1983

    OMEGAPRIME1983 Well-Known Member

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    If you want to polish paying, just start at like 400, and start going through finer papers until you get to the desired sheen you want, :) 
     
  10. khopson

    khopson Well-Known Member

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    This helps a lot. I have some very bulky pieces, which won't fully submerge in an alcohol bath (unless I use gallons of the stuff), so the idea of wet sanding with alcohol could be a good alternative. Also, what you noted about the grit makes sense. Thanks to everyone for the tips. I think you've steered me in the right direction.
     
  11. Superquad7

    Superquad7 We're only human. Super Mod

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    If you're painting over the entire figure, doing a light sanding job won't be an issue. If you're only wanting to remove a paint deco, I'd recommend doing just that in lieu of sanding.

    A light sanding job will help any top coat of paint to stick better, as the surface will have a bit of a "tooth" due to the plastic being sanded.
     
  12. OMEGAPRIME1983

    OMEGAPRIME1983 Well-Known Member

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    I forgot to mention in my last post that once you get the desired sheen on the paints, you should put a good strong clear cost on the parts to help protect them as well.
     

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