Question for people with camera Smarts

Discussion in 'Video Games and Technology' started by SoundMaster, Jul 6, 2009.

  1. SoundMaster

    SoundMaster Likes RID Bulkhead.

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    I was in the middle of taking pictures for my comic when this appeared in one of the pics:

    [​IMG]

    It looks like a flame, which there were obviously none around when I took the picture. Is this something by the camera, like a reaction to the way the light was coming through?
     
  2. Lance Halberd

    Lance Halberd oh hai

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    That could be any number of things. It would be helpful if you described your setting in detail. What kind of camera are you using? What settings are you using, like f-stop and shutter speed? How are you lighting the scene? Are there any natural light sources nearby? Is your house built over an ancient burial ground? How often does the housekeeping get done?
     
  3. SoundMaster

    SoundMaster Likes RID Bulkhead.

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    There are two lights about 5 feet away. The walls are wooden, but I doubt it's the wood. (Wood=somewhat yellow) And I'm positive it's not a haunting. The house was built in the 80's, and the only thing that's ever died in it are a few pets.

    The only bright yellow object is my shirt, which is of coarse, behind the camera.

    The camera itself is a Powershot A520, set on nightscene.
     
  4. Lance Halberd

    Lance Halberd oh hai

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    From the Powershot A520 user manual, page 38:

    A slow shutter speed will cause moving objects to blur in your picture. While the shutter was open, something, it could be dust or a cobweb or who knows what, very quickly moved in front of the lens, and its motion was captured by the imager.

    To avoid it in the future, up your lighting greatly and use a fast shutter speed.
     
  5. Vexza

    Vexza Nerdicon

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    That is so weird. o.0

    Maybe it was a spirit or something.
     
  6. Nutcrusher

    Nutcrusher Decepticon

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    Spot on.

    I used to take lots of trippy pictures with slow shutter speed combined with flash, which is how the night mode works in most cameras. The flash will illuminate an object, and you can have a trail of the light reflected off them for an awesome effect. You probably moved the camera too early after the flash, thinking that the picture was taken instantly.

    Like so eh?
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  7. SoundMaster

    SoundMaster Likes RID Bulkhead.

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    Thanks for the help.
     

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