Customs: Question for all kitbashers

Discussion in 'Creative General Discussion' started by ShawnL7, Jun 13, 2007.

  1. ShawnL7

    ShawnL7 Old School Transfan

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    Has anyone had any luck with using die-cast vehicles as a shell? I'm having trouble finding a kit in plastic for one of my projects. The plastic kits are either too small or are extremely hard to find. And are pricey.--
    I know the metal will be more difficult to cut and it's not flexible, but has anyone tried this?
    I'd like to stick with just plastic kits but there seems to be an abundance of die-cast models at a cheep price.
     
  2. Ravenxl7

    Ravenxl7 W.A.F.F.L.E.O.

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    I've never done it, but I do know it's been done before. Someone, can't remember who, gave Classics Bumblebee an old VW bug alt-mode using a die-cast model car.
     
  3. Ops_was_a_truck

    Ops_was_a_truck JOOOLIE ANDREWWWWWS!!!!!!

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    Honestly, I think it's worth it to stick with the plastic. Here are a few reasons why:

    -Most of the model glues are designed to really bond plastics together. You can use a tough-grade superglue to bond plastic and metal, but the bond that the glue makes is not going to be as strong as plastic-to-plastic. You're dooming yourself to parts falling off.

    -Cutting metal cars into Transforming parts is a completely unforgiving process. If you make a mistake, there's no going back and repairing the mistake. If your cuts are not 100% clean and straight, you're going to end up doing a lot of repair work...man, I don't even want to think about the amount of healing that'd have to be done to fix metalwork. Plastic is nice enough that you can always patch & sand poorly-cut parts with glue and putty.

    -Metal will not bend - or it won't bend enough for you to have any "leg room" if you're trying to get a part to move or slide into place. If glued, it will simply snap off. If screwed on - especially to your own custom parts, like, say, a series of pieces of styrene - it will probably be a bit more forgiving, but then you have to hope that the styrene-to-transformer glue bond is tough.

    I dunno. I've tried it once, got about midway through the project, and just had issue after issue with trying to get the metal parts to remain on the kit. If you want to try it, best of luck. I think it's a better idea to work with plastic kits.
     
  4. ShawnL7

    ShawnL7 Old School Transfan

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    thanks for all your help
     

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