Customs: Question about Dyes!!!

Discussion in 'Creative General Discussion' started by RodimusDawg, Sep 22, 2008.

  1. RodimusDawg

    RodimusDawg Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2007
    Posts:
    2,165
    News Credits:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    167
    Likes:
    +9
    If were to prime a figure with white paint and then dyed it a color say green at a lower tempt would it work? Or would the primer just come off?
     
  2. frenzyrumble

    frenzyrumble Banned

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2007
    Posts:
    8,657
    News Credits:
    50
    Trophy Points:
    176
    Likes:
    +50
    why not just prime it with green?
     
  3. grayfox

    grayfox Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2004
    Posts:
    2,401
    Trophy Points:
    207
    Likes:
    +4
    Ebay:
    You can't successfully dye white primer. Believe me, I tried. Somehow the dye doesn't stick to the paint. I imagine it's because the paint coat (primer) isn't porous. Along with the dye not sticking, what happens is the primer "softens" in the hot water and you'll get dings and scratches when manipulating your pieces when you're taking them out of the water.

    I've tried so many times and not once did I get good results. The closer I got was the white primer came out very, very slightly darker.
     
  4. frenzyrumble

    frenzyrumble Banned

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2007
    Posts:
    8,657
    News Credits:
    50
    Trophy Points:
    176
    Likes:
    +50
    I don't understand what you guys are trying to achive. What strength does "primer" add to your project that dye isn't going to add? I mean, your dye is only as strong as what it dyes...
     
  5. Boggs6ft7

    Boggs6ft7 TFW2005 Supporter

    Joined:
    May 25, 2006
    Posts:
    2,399
    Trophy Points:
    216
    Likes:
    +0
    I think the goal is to take a darker color figure and dye it another lighter color, something that dye alone cannot do.

    I have read that this is possible after you use a white vinyl dye from SEM or another vinyl dye company, then darkening it with whatever color you want. Downside is that spray vinyl dye does not work on all plastics of transformers, specifically the dense plastic used in joints. So you would have to match that color of paint.

    I have not tried this process, just read about it. The other option is to just use a green spray vinyl dye, but the best you are going to find is probably a deep forest green, nothing bright.

    You can find most of that stuff at your local auto parts store. Some of the stuff is vinyl dye coating, and some is just straight up vinyl dye. They behave different, but use the same process of melting the plastic to adhere to whatever you spraying them on. I prefer the straight spray dye, just not as common as the coating stuff.

    Don't use the stuff indoors.
     
  6. frenzyrumble

    frenzyrumble Banned

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2007
    Posts:
    8,657
    News Credits:
    50
    Trophy Points:
    176
    Likes:
    +50
    yeah, i thought they were aiming towards that, but the dye would only end up as strong as the primer it's dyed...so why not use colored primer? lol....
     
  7. grayfox

    grayfox Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2004
    Posts:
    2,401
    Trophy Points:
    207
    Likes:
    +4
    Ebay:
    I agree that the dye wouldn't be very strong since if there's paint rub, the dye (being on the primer) will rub off as well. But in some cases, where there will be no paint rub, the option to color white paint using dye would be nice. I know one time I had the desired color in dye form and not paint and the parts were molded in dark colored plastic. So priming white and then dying sounded like a good idea.
     
  8. RodimusDawg

    RodimusDawg Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2007
    Posts:
    2,165
    News Credits:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    167
    Likes:
    +9
    Thanks for all the info guy you have all just saved me a lot of time and headaches. I plan on doing three dye jobs. A Powerglide into red, Onslaught green into a HardHead, and I want to due Unicron a darker shade of orange.

    The only one I think may not work is the Onslaught to green. I want a forgest green color and work off of that. But he is sort of blue to begin with and you have to take the mold original color into consideration before you dye correct?
     
  9. ErechOveraker

    ErechOveraker I'm with Plowking.

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2007
    Posts:
    3,470
    News Credits:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    172
    Likes:
    +1
    Yes, it's like a color wheel, so you'd want to use yellow dye to get Onslaught green. The richness of the green would depend on how much yellow you used, so if you wanted a light aqua-green you'd use very little dye etc. Although I have never personally dyed anything this way (just from whatever color to black on a couple projects, and then white powerglide to red most recently), so I'll be interested in your results.

    As for the dying paint, my brain won't even wrap around the notion, I don't understand the rationale for that at all. Like not even a little. It's like you're asking how to make an oven out of flour and water to bake a cake in, PREPOSTEROUS! If you're willing to prime it, why not just prime it the color you want?
     
  10. grayfox

    grayfox Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2004
    Posts:
    2,401
    Trophy Points:
    207
    Likes:
    +4
    Ebay:
    Just in case you didn't read my previous post in this thread....

    I can't speak for Rodimus, but that was my reason for trying to dye paint. I don't think it's such a stupid idea. Just one that would've made my life easier at the time.
     
  11. ErechOveraker

    ErechOveraker I'm with Plowking.

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2007
    Posts:
    3,470
    News Credits:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    172
    Likes:
    +1
    I read it. And in case you didn't read my previous post, again, I just don't understand it. I'm used to mixing custom colors too, so maybe that's another reason I can't wrap my brain around the whole idea, yeah? Like, if I wanted something a specific color, I'd just mix and color match till I got it.

    Dying a figure you already painted, in the same way you'd dye plastic (I assume this is how you guys intend to have done it) just seems like twice as much work to me, than just painting it to start the color you wanted.

    Not to discourage experimentation and all, mind you. It's good to know people are trying different things in their bashes.
     

Share This Page