PS3 Wifi issues

Discussion in 'Video Games and Technology' started by Optimus_Prowl, Apr 17, 2010.

  1. Optimus_Prowl

    Optimus_Prowl I'm the Goddamed Two-Face

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    So we upgraded our router to a new Netgear Wireless-N set up. We set it up with a WPA encryption. All of our computers can connect just fine, but the PS3 can't connect at all. This also includes all of our mobile devices such as an iPod Touch, and Blackberrys.

    Any reason for this? I'm wondering if the PS3 can't support N networks or something.

    Help would be appreciated as I can't login to my PSN.

    Thanks guys.
     
  2. Gigatron_2005

    Gigatron_2005 President of Calendars

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    PS3 does not support N. You have to set your router to G/N mixed mode.
     
  3. Optimus_Prowl

    Optimus_Prowl I'm the Goddamed Two-Face

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    Ah ok, I'll take a look and see what I can do. Thanks man.
     
  4. UnicronHound

    UnicronHound Well-Known Member

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    I have a Netgear wireless-N router also, and all I had to do for the ps3 to use it was set up the internet connection again, that's it, and it works fine. To my knowledge my router is only running as a N router
     
  5. Gigatron_2005

    Gigatron_2005 President of Calendars

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    its most likely running in mixed mode by default.
     
  6. mineraljane

    mineraljane Gravity Hugger

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    Gigatron_2005 is correct: the PS3 isn't built for wireless N. You may be able to buy an adapter for it or use another router as an adapter if you want it to connect to a strictly wireless N network.

    Keep in mind that if you're using a mixed network, the overall throughput of the router will be reduced to the slowest active connection. If you're using a client with wireless G capabilities on a mixed network, the advantages to having a wireless N network will be negated. Of course, the difference may not even be noticeable unless you're transferring large files frequently within the network, so it really isn't a big deal. You can always get around this by having two separate networks, one G and one N, that interact when necessary and otherwise maintain wireless N's stated performance.
     

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