Customs: Prepping your figure before painting?

Discussion in 'Creative General Discussion' started by deliciouspeter, Mar 17, 2009.

  1. deliciouspeter

    deliciouspeter Back in Black TFW2005 Supporter

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    Hello friends.

    I've been repainting for some time, but haven't had a tried and true method of preparing a figure to accept paint. I've lately been using rubbing alcohol and it has worked pretty well, but the last figure I repainted with this method (Animated Voyager Prime) had a wide range of success. Some paint is on like glue, fingernails won't scratch it, some paint is coming off in flakes, like dandruff. I was using Krylon fusion, in very thin coats and letting it dry over 8 hours between coats.

    I've looked through some tutorials for advice, but there are many different suggestions, from dish soap to paint thinner. Thinking these tutorials may be out of date a bit, I thought I'd ask what your methods are for prepping a figure? Thanks, DP
     
  2. Satomiblood

    Satomiblood Prototype Black

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    I'll usually take an old toothbrush and scrub the figure with soap and warm water. I never use rubbing alcohol, although I have a bottle just in case I want to try it.
     
  3. frenzyrumble

    frenzyrumble Banned

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    (gets ready to duck)

    I pour some lacquer thinner onto a soft towel, and hand clean the entire figure. The areas where I can't reach with my towel, I use a brush, but am sure to remove any pools of the lacquer thinner. I am sure to gently rub every area. It is clear what areas I've covered because they are lusterless after this process. This technique seems to not only remove mold residue, but an extremely thin layer of plastic where the gloss is. I've done several tests using this method in 1 area, and the other methods (soap/water or alchohol/water) in other areas, hands down the lacquer thinner prepped areas seem to bond best with the paints.

    Keep in mind, there are areas where you'll want to stay away from with lacquer thinner, such as the rubbery parts and clear/translucent pieces.

    From there, I will base coat/prime with the color of that particular part. I usually base coat with a few "clicks" darker of the aimed hue for the final outcome. For example, I prime/base coat Powerglide with a brick red, but work the blending and drybrushing upwards in hue to a more bright/lighter shade of red.
     
  4. deliciouspeter

    deliciouspeter Back in Black TFW2005 Supporter

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    Thanks Satomi. I feel like I'm doing that now, with mixed results. Try the rubbing alcohol...just wear gloves!

    F_R...Do you do anything after you wipe it down to remove the thinner, or just let it evaporate and then paint?

    What scared me away from this was accidentally getting Universe Dinobot's dino arms with paint thinner....they melted like hot cheese.
     
  5. frenzyrumble

    frenzyrumble Banned

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    I only fix up the areas where there's potential rubbing issues. I have yet to run into these mystery cases where plastic melts or even gets damaged. Perhaps I have magic paint thinner hehe.
     
  6. deliciouspeter

    deliciouspeter Back in Black TFW2005 Supporter

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    AH! That makes sense. Something so simple. Just the rubbing areas! Thanks man!
     

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