2D Artwork: Pointillism Prime

Discussion in 'Transformers Fan Art' started by fiire_dragon_88, Sep 29, 2012.

  1. fiire_dragon_88

    fiire_dragon_88 Andimus Prime Time

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    So I started school this week, going for 3D animation, and first week is all about learning photo shop. I ended up shading a quarter of a picture in pointillism, which is using thousands of dots. I liked the way it looked so I did the whole picture. People called me crazy because of the sheer tolerance it takes, and it took 8 hours because the picture was 20 inches wide, but I think it came out good. I didn't free hand it though. I used the reference picture on a background layer and then did the piece on a layer above it, still hard work though.


    Here is the original. Artist unknown.


    And here is what I made
     

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  2. Altitron

    Altitron Commercial Artist

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    E. J. Su is the original artist.

    - Alty
     
  3. Yaujta

    Yaujta Broken. TFW2005 Supporter

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    Very nice! As a first foray into the world of pointillism, it turned out quite well.

    The technique takes practice. It was one of my favorite mediums in college, and I remember doing several pieces that took days to do.
    One 'pointer' I can give is to pay attention to groupings. There are some areas on your piece where it's easy to tell where you started and stopped for breaks. Not noticeable at first, but easy to catch if you're looking for them. In a way, those aspects of a piece are what I always kind of liked, but worked to get beyond in order to give the final piece a cleaner finish.
    Also, I used to use rapidiograph pens for any and all ink work. They're expensive, but you get less variance in the shape of the dots and an even ink flow.
     

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