Pirate-Slaying Censorship Bill gets unanimously Passed

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by RebelMan, Nov 19, 2010.

  1. RebelMan

    RebelMan Well-Known Member

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    The Combating Online Infringement and Counterfeits Act (COICA) sets up a system through which the US government can blacklist a pirate website from the Domain Name System, ban credit card companies from processing US payments to the site, and forbid online ad networks from working with the site. This morning, COICA unanimously passed the Senate Judiciary Committee.

    "We are disappointed that the Senate Judiciary Committee this morning chose to disregard the concerns of public-interest groups, Internet engineers, Internet companies, human-rights groups and law professors in approving a bill that could do great harm to the public and to the Internet," said Public Knowledge president Gigi Sohn, who pledged to craft a "more narrowly tailored bill" next year to deal with "rogue websites."

    But the content industries don't mind the current version. Bob Pisano, who runs the MPAA, trotted out the "2.4 million hard working, middle-class jobs in all 50 states" that his industry creates. "For these workers and their families, digital theft means declining incomes, lost jobs and reduced health and retirement benefits," he said. "Unfortunately, this means nothing to the operators of rogue websites who seek to benefit illegally from the hard work of others."

    The industry is well aware that "censorship" doesn't go down well with many Americans, so it has been playing up the "free speech protections" in the bill lately. RIAA CEO Mitch Bainwol made sure to stress the point again this morning.

    "With this first vote, Congress has begun to strike at the lifeline of foreign scam sites, while protecting free speech and boosting the legal online marketplace," he said. "Those seeking to thwart this bipartisan bill are protecting online thieves and those who gain pleasure and profit from de-valuing American property."

    That last jibe is the sort of comment made by those who can't understand why, say, people accused of horrific crimes still get defense lawyers. ("Why do you want murderers to go free?") It's sad to see Bainwol resort to it. As we noted earlier this week, we have concerns about this approach that are premised in large part on the content industries' almost comically misguided attempts to lock down or shutter innovative technologies and websites that turn out in fact to be legal and hugely useful—like the VCR, HD radio, MP3 players, HDTV, DAT, and YouTube.

    Giving that industry a special process, one that doesn't apply to sites that traffic in other sorts of illegal-in-the-US-activity, raises concerns that have nothing to do with a love of widespread piracy. COICA could censor even sites that "enable or facilitate a violation" of copyright, it mucks about with DNS, and it actually requires the US Attorney General to keep a list of "naughty" sites even though no action has been taken against them. There has to be a more careful approach.
     
  2. Tekkaman Blade

    Tekkaman Blade Professor of Animation

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    From my understanding the bill is dead for this year, they will have to represent it next year with the new congress.
    recent e-mail I got.

    big news! Yesterday the Senate Judiciary Committee voted unanimously to send the Internet blacklist bill to the full Senate, but it was quickly stopped by Sen. Ron Wyden (D-OR) who denounced it as "a bunker-buster cluster bomb" aimed at the Internet and pledged to "do everything I can to take the necessary steps to stop it from passing the U.S. Senate." Wyden's opposition practically guarantees the bill is dead this year -- and next year the new Congress will have to reintroduce the bill and start all over again. But even that might not happen: Dianne Feinstein (D-CA), Hollywood's own senator, told the committee that even she was uncomfortable with the Internet censorship portion of the bill and hoped it could be removed when they took it up again next year!

    Also it wouldn't work completely
    If you know the Internet Protocol address--the IP address for cnet.com, for instance, is currently 216.239.113.101--would still be able to connect to the Web site even if the computer that normally translates a domain name into its numeric address pretends not to know it.

    So while the domain name may be off the list, you could still access the website.


     
  3. Bumblethumper

    Bumblethumper old misery guts

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    that's a pretty blunt instrument. I had thought that the fight against internet piracy was a futile game of whack-a-mole, but this could be a game-changer.

    Presumably it's intended to target torrent sites and the like, but it could apply to so much else that you wonder where they'll draw the line.
     
  4. Valkysas

    Valkysas Attack Buffalo

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    They won't draw a line. I guarantee no one is even thinking about the possibility of lines.
     
  5. Zherbus

    Zherbus In Shogo Hasui, we trust.

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    So if this all happens, then people will just carefully manage their host lists and go to wherever they want to anyway?
     
  6. Murasame

    Murasame CHIMICHANGAS

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    Sad to hear that you've got a similar problem there overseas. Here politicians want to accomplish an infrastructure for censorship under the banner of fighting child pornography (although many people proved it is far more efficient to inform the provider to just delete the content, as it is illegal in most parts of the world).

    And then they want to spy on every citizen under the guise of fighting terror...
     
  7. Secretcode

    Secretcode Keeper of Encarta Veteran

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    Haha. A single country wants to censor the WORLD-wide web? Good-fucking-luck.

    Nice knowing that the US politicians are just as bad as Chinese Officials at this point.
     
  8. Bumblethumper

    Bumblethumper old misery guts

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    Well all domain names are registered with ICANN, which is in the US, which did invent the internet. So they can presumably block a website from its domain name.

    I'm sure there'll be ways around it, even if people have to create a whole other internet.

    Supposedly it's to protect businesses that create content, but just wait and see how long it takes for them to use this to go after places like Wikileaks instead.
     
  9. Murasame

    Murasame CHIMICHANGAS

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  10. Tekkaman Blade

    Tekkaman Blade Professor of Animation

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    also even if it passed the senate, it would have to go through the house as well and be signed in to law by the president before it would be official. Then even at that expect it to end up in the supreme court do to free speech issue.
     
  11. Darkwing48

    Darkwing48 Heroic Decepticon

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    But, I guess you missed the article that state's the Chinese hijacked the routing of military-bound packets for a whole 28 minutes.

    China Internet rerouting likely accidental, says security firm - Computerworld
     
  12. Kickback

    Kickback Proud father Administrator Super Mod News Staff

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    This is a huge victory for the RIAA and the movie companies, who calculate on made-up-numbers that they lose billions a year from Internet piracy. However, this bill impedes the First Ammendment and will be challenged and eventually destroyed.

    Then again, we got Government-forced Health Care, so what do I know?
     
  13. Gigatron_2005

    Gigatron_2005 President of Calendars

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  14. TheIncredibleHulk

    TheIncredibleHulk Find Gary Busey!

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    I got the same thing
     
  15. Gigatron_2005

    Gigatron_2005 President of Calendars

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    Yeah, that will learn me to only read the previous 4 posts, or provide a link. Anyway, next year is gonna be scary. I can see this getting through easily.
     
  16. Creaky

    Creaky King of Puppies

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    The US Government can stick it. The day they start telling me what I can and can't do is the day I switch over and illegally download everything I could ever want off freenet, just to spite them.
     
  17. KnightHawkke

    KnightHawkke A Man, Who Does Not Exist. TFW2005 Supporter

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    not the least bit shocked, the train ride to this wreck began the second napster first began those years ago.

    What does shock me is it took them this long to bring out the hammer like that, I expected it years ago. Whether the first version passes or not the gauntlet has been thrown down.

    This will not end pretty.
     
  18. Fishdirt

    Fishdirt Tin Toy Transformer

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    I remember when the day when less then 1000 people had the internet and used words like bbs. Ah, thems was the days.
     
  19. Dremare

    Dremare Had an Epiphany

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    This bill is already violating the First Amendment, even when it hasn't been passed yet.
     
  20. 03Mach1

    03Mach1 Reason Has No Voice

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    If I don't download media illegally does this even effect me?
     

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