Photographing Repaints

Discussion in 'Radicons Customs' started by frenzyrumble, Aug 7, 2007.

  1. frenzyrumble

    frenzyrumble Banned

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    Hi repainters,

    I'd like to know if anyone has suggestions or hints on how to best shoot pictures of a repaint. I've seen some work looks professionally photographed, though even with a 8meg digital camera, mine look muted and fuzzy.

    What's the best way with lighting? Should I turn off camera's flash? stuff like that.
     
  2. Sidecutter

    Sidecutter Evil Dealer Scum TFW2005 Supporter

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    Good light is paramount. Also, make sure you're using the appropriate White Balance settings, exposure (EV), and adjust your focus. You should be getting good, sharp pics out of an 8MP camera...
     
  3. Sidecutter

    Sidecutter Evil Dealer Scum TFW2005 Supporter

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    Good light is paramount. Also, make sure you're using the appropriate White Balance settings, exposure (EV), and adjust your focus. You should be getting good, sharp pics out of an 8MP camera...
     
  4. frenzyrumble

    frenzyrumble Banned

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    Any specific tpyes of bulbs or ...I've heard sunlight is the best lighting?
     
  5. frenzyrumble

    frenzyrumble Banned

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    Any specific tpyes of bulbs or ...I've heard sunlight is the best lighting?
     
  6. revlimiter

    revlimiter Bot Hacker

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    A camera with a macro setting that works is pretty important. But slightly less than that is a lightbox.

    [​IMG]
    The frame of my lightbox. It's just PVC pipe wedged together (no glue). The black thing on the top is a scrap of ABS plastic that allows me to clip on different backgrounds.

    [​IMG]
    The white stuff is a $2 vinyl shower curtain liner. This diffuses the light, yet lets more light thru than a bed sheet.

    [​IMG]
    Here's how I sometimes have it setup. The 3 lamps are Target clip lamps ($6 each) with high-watt compact fluorescent bulbs in them (like 25 watt). It provides pretty good light. The stand is just an old TV stand that I bought at a garage sale. A low stand like this is actually more comfortable to me than a table.

    and with a good, customizable light source like this, you can do stuff like this.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  7. revlimiter

    revlimiter Bot Hacker

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    A camera with a macro setting that works is pretty important. But slightly less than that is a lightbox.

    [​IMG]
    The frame of my lightbox. It's just PVC pipe wedged together (no glue). The black thing on the top is a scrap of ABS plastic that allows me to clip on different backgrounds.

    [​IMG]
    The white stuff is a $2 vinyl shower curtain liner. This diffuses the light, yet lets more light thru than a bed sheet.

    [​IMG]
    Here's how I sometimes have it setup. The 3 lamps are Target clip lamps ($6 each) with high-watt compact fluorescent bulbs in them (like 25 watt). It provides pretty good light. The stand is just an old TV stand that I bought at a garage sale. A low stand like this is actually more comfortable to me than a table.

    and with a good, customizable light source like this, you can do stuff like this.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  8. Lobo

    Lobo Well-Known Member

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  9. Lobo

    Lobo Well-Known Member

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  10. frenzyrumble

    frenzyrumble Banned

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    thanks for the input.
    I have a canon powershot..without a manuel anymore.

    there's a dial up top, I'm guessing for different types of shots. Gonna try them all to see what's best. maybe look up what each one actual does...heh
     
  11. frenzyrumble

    frenzyrumble Banned

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    thanks for the input.
    I have a canon powershot..without a manuel anymore.

    there's a dial up top, I'm guessing for different types of shots. Gonna try them all to see what's best. maybe look up what each one actual does...heh
     
  12. revlimiter

    revlimiter Bot Hacker

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    It's easy to download replacement manuals, especially Canon. I shoot a couple of Nikons, but my love for Canon point and shoots is pretty high. They're great little cameras. Fiddle with your white balance, shoot your toys with macro engaged (the little flower on most cameras), and build a lightbox. That one Lobo linked to is the inspiration for my own. You can also make one out of a cut-apart cardboard box!
     
  13. revlimiter

    revlimiter Bot Hacker

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    It's easy to download replacement manuals, especially Canon. I shoot a couple of Nikons, but my love for Canon point and shoots is pretty high. They're great little cameras. Fiddle with your white balance, shoot your toys with macro engaged (the little flower on most cameras), and build a lightbox. That one Lobo linked to is the inspiration for my own. You can also make one out of a cut-apart cardboard box!
     
  14. frenzyrumble

    frenzyrumble Banned

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    here's one I took now, just for an idea. It's not so great. I just downloaded the camera's manual, so I will post another pic once I get the camera optimized and lightbox.

    [​IMG]
     
  15. frenzyrumble

    frenzyrumble Banned

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    here's one I took now, just for an idea. It's not so great. I just downloaded the camera's manual, so I will post another pic once I get the camera optimized and lightbox.

    [​IMG]
     
  16. revlimiter

    revlimiter Bot Hacker

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    What's wrong with that photo? Looks pretty good to me.

    One thing: With a point-and-shoot, the way to get shallow field depth (only a small part in focus) is to engage macro and zoom to the edge of your macro's useful range. You'll end up with only a little bit of your toy in focus. Conversely, if you shoot in macro mode at the widest zoom setting (zoomed out as wide as possible), you'll have more of the toy in focus.

    If your camera has an Aperture Priority mode, use it and set the aperture to f5.6 or f8 or something like that. The smaller aperture will give you more depth of field and more of your toy will be in focus.
     
  17. revlimiter

    revlimiter Bot Hacker

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    What's wrong with that photo? Looks pretty good to me.

    One thing: With a point-and-shoot, the way to get shallow field depth (only a small part in focus) is to engage macro and zoom to the edge of your macro's useful range. You'll end up with only a little bit of your toy in focus. Conversely, if you shoot in macro mode at the widest zoom setting (zoomed out as wide as possible), you'll have more of the toy in focus.

    If your camera has an Aperture Priority mode, use it and set the aperture to f5.6 or f8 or something like that. The smaller aperture will give you more depth of field and more of your toy will be in focus.
     
  18. frenzyrumble

    frenzyrumble Banned

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    sweet thanks! I am currently reading 170 pages of it's manual (which i never thought was necessary until now)

    I don't see any specific area on "macro setting" but there is a way to change aperture
     
  19. frenzyrumble

    frenzyrumble Banned

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    sweet thanks! I am currently reading 170 pages of it's manual (which i never thought was necessary until now)

    I don't see any specific area on "macro setting" but there is a way to change aperture
     
  20. frenzyrumble

    frenzyrumble Banned

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    OK, now that i've got the camera optimized, I just need to work on lighting. I set the aperture to about 7 and adjusted the brightness, also shot in macro mode with the flower icon 'on'

    here's the result.
    [​IMG]

    next, I build a lightbox...
     

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