Painting without base-coating (would this last?)/Alclad and Future questions.

Discussion in 'Creative General Discussion' started by iuJacob, Jul 26, 2017.

  1. iuJacob

    iuJacob Well-Known Member

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    I am brand new to this. I've been reading through the tutorials here, and looking on YouTube, but some questions remain.

    I've started on a flakey old transmetal Rattrap. I completely disassembled him, stripped the paint, and I've basecoated with Alclad gloss black. Next step is Alclad Chrome (I have another question about this down below)....

    First question:

    In the meantime, there's some other figures I'd just like to spruce up a bit (without the rigorous process that Rattrap became (lots of heating of pins!...)). I came across some videos where this guy just throws the acrylic paint right on. No sanding, no priming or basecoating at all. He doesn't even appear to be clear coating them after.



    If I were to do this, I would personally be clear coating them, either with a standard Tamiya Clear Coat or Future.
    But how would they stand up to handling/the test of time?


    Second question:

    Regarding Alclad, I remember reading at some point that throwing Future on AFTER gloss black, THEN putting the Chrome on top would produce a shinier finish.

    However, I've also read NOT to use anything else in this process other than Gloss Black, Chrome, and then Alclad Aqua Gloss on top, as everything else (including Future) ruins the Chrome finish.

    Given the conflicting advice, I'm asking here where there's a ton of good pieces I've seen.

    Thanks guys. :) 


    EDIT: I think I may have posted this in the wrong section?
     
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  2. Agamus

    Agamus Not an Iguana

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    Yeah, this is a Creative General Discussion-type thread. Don't worry about it though, a mod will come by and move it sooner or later.
     
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  3. Effion

    Effion It's also a gun

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    You definitely CAN paint onto the bare figures like in the video and it will come out fine, depending on the colors and paints you're using. I wash all my figures before I paint em (even if I'm just adding details) to make sure any mould release is washed away and then put some paint to plastic. I think just about all of my custom figures are paint right onto the plastic (except for my Gen Windblade where I primed her black parts to add red).

    I didn't topcoat when I first started and the paint definitely wore away after a while. All my figures I've topcoated (with Future or Future + Tamiya Flat Base) still look just like when I'd finished them (with the exception of maybe some rub spots where friction wore things down, but they stand up fine to normal handling and whatnot).
     
    Last edited: Jul 26, 2017
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  4. DJsCustoms

    DJsCustoms Well-Known Member

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    Honestly you only want to do a base coat if you're going for either:
    - A massive redeco of a figure.
    - Adding any type of Chrome or metallic flake effects to the areas.

    A base coat is...a base coat. It's mostly to help make the figure consistent by the time you're done painting it with other colours.
    IE if I wanted to turn an Smokescreen into a Prowl, I'd run into the problem of smokescreen's blue/red colors interchanging or being striped on certain parts. If I just painted these to white/black, the parts where it used to transition from blue to red become slightly darker/lighter than areas right next to them and it just looks tacky.

    However, the megatron custom in the video isn't changing colours much from the base paintjob. A basecoat isn't REALLY needed for that.


    It's also important to remember that paint adds mass with each layer. Every coat thickens the surface of the figure, which makes it more prone to paint chipping during transformation or movement. So if you can avoid having to do a heavy basecoat, it will do wonders to preserve the paintjob.
    That's just my personal experience though.
     
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  5. iuJacob

    iuJacob Well-Known Member

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    Thank you for the helpful responses so far :) 

    Going to be using Tamiya paints for the most part. I was trying the Testors, and either I have an old batch or...? It simply doesn't seem to go on as nicely as the Tamiya stuff.

    (Both acrylic)
     
  6. DJsCustoms

    DJsCustoms Well-Known Member

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    That's just testors in general.
    Using Testors for hand-painted works is very VERY thick and frankly blob-like. There are times that's actually useful, but typically not as a solid coat.
    Using Testors as the airbrush it's meant to be can work VERY nicely...If you mix it with the right amount of Testor's enamel thinner/brush cleaner. How much should you mix? Good luck with that, it seems to vary from bottle to bottle and color to color. IE Purple takes quite a lot, whereas Red&Gold need very little(if any). That's just my experience with it though, someone may have better advice.
     

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