Customs: Painting a custom using brushes

Discussion in 'Creative General Discussion' started by gambit020480, Jun 28, 2011.

  1. gambit020480

    gambit020480 Banned

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    What is the best method of removing brush strokes from a paint job? I have tried sanding and it appears to work some. Is this the most effective way?
     
  2. Satomiblood

    Satomiblood Prototype Black

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    VERY THIN coats of paint. Also, wait for the first coat to dry before applying the next one. May I also ask what paints you're using?
     
  3. gambit020480

    gambit020480 Banned

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    I am using testors paints. I am currently customizing a Ciffjumper from a RTS Bumblebee and a Ricochet from a RTS Jazz. The streaks are only visible on portions of the door panels and roof. I would assume because they are consistenly flat surfaces. I tried sanding using a 150 grit sanding block. It seemed to help. Any other tips?
     
  4. Treadshot A1

    Treadshot A1 Or just 'A1' for short...

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    As Satomi said, very thin coats of paint, and lots of them, applied after the last is dry.

    Also, sand the figure lightly before painting. That's about it.
     
  5. Satomiblood

    Satomiblood Prototype Black

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    I don't even bother sanding. Thin coats should do the trick, especially with testors. Did you prime the figures or are you just painting over the plastic?
     
  6. hXcpunk23

    hXcpunk23 The Chaos Bringer

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    Add a few drops of Future to help thin your paints (if they are the Testors Acrylics), stir/shake them well, then do thin coats (as mentioned in the above comments). Let each coat dry well, then do another. The key is patience.

    I would lightly sand the areas you've done that have brush strokes, then thin your paints and do light coats to match up to the areas that already came out well.
     
  7. CodeXCDM

    CodeXCDM Well-Known Member

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    Any recommendations on a decent brush set for starters? >_> Thanks.
     
  8. Superquad7

    Superquad7 We're only human. Super Mod

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    Using Future floor mixed in with paints is just awesome. What I do is instead of mixing it in the bottle, I have a separate reservoir to keep a small amount of Future in. I get enough paint on my brush, and mix it in the Future reservoir. The key is to build up, as if you use too much Future, it waters the paint down.

    The principle employed here is that Future is my thinner for the acrylics I use. If I were using enamels, paint thinner would have a similar effect. With oil paints, linseed oil does the same thing.

    Future is self-leveling, so if it's applied well, most of the brush strokes are thinned out simply by the Future drying.
     

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