Customs: Paint to water ratio

Discussion in 'Creative General Discussion' started by Fishdirt, Apr 3, 2011.

  1. Fishdirt

    Fishdirt Tin Toy Transformer

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    I think I have watered down my paint a bit much because the coats are many so far and still not a nice even color. So, after doing my search and finding nothing, what is a good ratio for water to paint for brush on paint?
     
  2. Ramrider

    Ramrider TF Art Lad

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    That kinda depends on the paint, really, and what consistency it is out of the bottle. I tend to say about the consistency of single cream or milk; you want it wet enough to flow well, but obviously not so watery that it doesn't cover anything and runs where you don't want it.
     
  3. Fishdirt

    Fishdirt Tin Toy Transformer

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    Well it was testors arcrylic but I had run into a problem with the testors black that I think is Enamel. It doesn't "take" the water. What would I use with this? Alcohol?
     
  4. Ramrider

    Ramrider TF Art Lad

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    Well, I'm not familiar with Testors specifically, but any acrylic should thin with water, though several brands (I'm pretty sure Tamiya does, but Testors probably does too) make their own thinners as well, which may well be alcohol-based.
    If it's enamel, then you'll definitely need a suitable paint thinner, which again, they'll have alongside the paints; white spirit or turpentine ought to do the job too.
     
  5. Superquad7

    Superquad7 We're only human. Super Mod

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    Ramrider is on it :rock 

    Yep, thinner is to enamel as water (or Future :D ) is to acrylic :) 
     
  6. Jaicen

    Jaicen Well-Known Member

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    That's not strictly true. Some Acrylics use oil based thinners.
    That said, i've never come across any in hobby shops, I think it's mostly for airgun use.
     
  7. Superquad7

    Superquad7 We're only human. Super Mod

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    Yep, this is true, though it's certainly not the norm. Just be sure to check the label of the paint you're using!
     
  8. Pimp My Toy

    Pimp My Toy AKA Jimster

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    And ideally use a thinner of the same brand as the paint. I have some Tamiya and Vallejo acrylics and a large bottle of Tamiya thinner (alcohol based). I tried thinning some Vallejo with the Tamiya thinner and the paint gunked up, ruining a perfectly good brush. There are slight differences between branded thinners and they aren't always compatible, so take care.

    I read somewhere that the Tamiya paint thinner is alcohol with a retarder so that the paint doesn't dry as quick, giving a bit more working time (similar to thinning with water).
     
  9. Pimp My Toy

    Pimp My Toy AKA Jimster

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    A quick PS...

    If you want it to thicken up again, leave the lid off and stir occassionally. The water should evaporate and the paint should thicken up. This is off of experience of thinning with alcohol, which evaporates much faster. The paint will thicken up and require a drop more thinner to be added as you work to get it back to the right consistency (thin enough not to drag the paint, but not thinned too much causing it to run).
     

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