Customs: Paint markers and colored plastic help

Discussion in 'Creative General Discussion' started by vm-01, Sep 22, 2011.

  1. vm-01

    vm-01 Well-Known Member

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    I have no painting experience and I want to paint some small parts using gundam markers. But I don't know what colors to use.

    The plastic is red. I want to paint it purple.

    Do I just use a purple marker? Do I use a blue marker? Do I use a white base first?
     
  2. SG hailstorm

    SG hailstorm JaAm aficionado

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    what type of markers for the gundams? paint markers or like sharpies?
     
  3. vm-01

    vm-01 Well-Known Member

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    paint
     
  4. SG hailstorm

    SG hailstorm JaAm aficionado

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    well, i'd start with a white base coat
     
  5. vm-01

    vm-01 Well-Known Member

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    Ok . Thanks!

    I'll get some white and purple then.
     
  6. SG hailstorm

    SG hailstorm JaAm aficionado

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    no prob ^_^ need any other tips or ways to go about stuff PM me i'd be glad to help out :thumb 
     
  7. vm-01

    vm-01 Well-Known Member

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    You've been very helpful. I'll take you up on that offer if needed.
     
  8. Satomiblood

    Satomiblood Prototype Black

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    Not sure how well this will turn out. Do people normally use paint markers for full-on repaints, or just detailing? I'd think the latter.
     
  9. vm-01

    vm-01 Well-Known Member

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    I've been looking for info on the past 2 days. And found very little.

    Spray painting is out of the question for me. I'd like to start with paint markers because I wouldn't have to mess with thinner and mixing and cleaning brushes. Then move on to brushes when I want to try getting better quality.

    I think I should be fine if I manage to track down markers with bigger points in the right colors. Otherwise I would stick to detailing. I'll also try using some clear coating.

    I have some KO's and accesories to experiment on. If I fail I'll just get some brushes and acrylic paint.
     
  10. Satomiblood

    Satomiblood Prototype Black

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    I'd personally resort to spray or brush, but you can try the paint marker method on a KO. I'd like it if you posted a thread so I could see the results.
     
  11. vm-01

    vm-01 Well-Known Member

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    Ok. I don't plan to start until christmas but I wanted to know which colors to order.

    I've also read that for wide areas I can bleed the marker and use a brush. Which is more expensive than tamiya but no mxing required.

    I guess I just need to start doing some tests until I figure some things out.
     
  12. destrongerlupus

    destrongerlupus #MoreSawBoss

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    Trust me, working with thinners (especially if you go with model grady acrylics and can just use water, or even better Future floor polish), is not as scary as it sounds.

    MOST of the time, honestly, you can more-or-less paint with the consistancy the paint comes out of the bottle. It won't be pro-level results, but it'll get the job done, and probably nicer and more cheaply than you will with paint parkers.

    Once you're ready to get even a little adventurous, and you want to go for the smoother "multiple thin coats" look, working with your thinner can be as simple as this:

    1. Open Jar of Paint
    2. Decant a small amount of thinner (water if you're doing acryls) into a cup
    3. Dip your brush in the paint jar
    4. Dip your brush in the thinner
    5. Apply paint to figure
    6. Repeat steps 3-5 until done
    You'll learn how to get the ratios right (and that's a lot more to do with personal preference than any standards) and learn control with time, but that will get you started!

    I like paint markers for a lot of things (I picked some up just the other day), but I've never had any good luck with trying to do a whole figure. The markers just DON'T get into the nooks or crannies very well, for instance. Not when I was new at this, and not with any recent experimentation (which, there has been some of!) either.

    You'll do better with brushes, I promise, and it'll be cheaper and more fun in the long run.

    D/L
     
  13. SG hailstorm

    SG hailstorm JaAm aficionado

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    same here
     
  14. vm-01

    vm-01 Well-Known Member

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    I was going to try using Future for a clear coat afterwards.

    Can it really be that easy? Just dip and dip with each stroke?
     
  15. destrongerlupus

    destrongerlupus #MoreSawBoss

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    Unless I'm going REALLY crazy trying to be perfect, yup, it can be JUST that easy. You can get a lot of control from just being mindful of how deep and how long you dip, if you agitate the brush while it's dipped etc. Just experiment, you'll find what works for you.

    DO DO DO DO DO, however, make sure that if you're "dipping" in Future (or any kind of thinner other than water), that you're dipping into a small cup of the stuff and not the main bottle. You don't want to pollute your main supply.

    You may also want to consider having multiple dip-cups one for each color you'll be using. I personally don't find that's usually neccessary, but it depends on which particular colors you're using and factors involving your specific technique.

    Hehe, I am SUCH a lazy painter, I KNOW how to go full bore and do it "right" and the results ARE that much nicer when you go the extra mile to be perfect, but it's a LOT of extra work, and if you're just learning, or doing aproject that's just a casual thing for yourself, you can get darn GOOD results pretty simply.

    There's too much to paint, so I try and keep it simple, mostly.

    D/L
     
  16. Superquad7

    Superquad7 We're only human. Super Mod

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    dl (along with the rest of you) has given some REALLY good advice. The appeal of the markers is the familiarity of the motor skills that come with years of us using pencils and pens. It's very alluring to not have to fool with overcoming that hurdle. However, learning a slightly new skill set is a great experience. In actuality, brushes don't handle much different than the other utensils we use.

    Every one of my own customs have had an extensive amount of brush work. Even though I switched to sprays not too much later after I had started out making customs (my main hold-up was location/environment (and actually still is a hindrance to an extent). I really wished I had discovered Future floor polish earlier on in my customs venture. The main things are that an artists learns his tools over time.

    Additionally, one can find way around the difficulties and obstacles presented. I can sometimes have mild hand tremors. Paint doesn't work like it should sometimes. A mess up may cause a removal of a whole coat only to start again. Life issues come up. The list is virtually endless.

    The good thing is that TFW2005.com/Radicons not only provides a place for our work, but really cool people to interact with. :) 

    Wishing you well on your venture, man :) 
     

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