Customs: Okay, I'm an amateur.

Discussion in 'Creative General Discussion' started by UnicronFTW, Jul 26, 2011.

  1. UnicronFTW

    UnicronFTW Don't blink.

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    I've just gotten started in the custom buisness. I havn't painted anything, only done physical modification. But before I can really get into it, I need a nice long list from the pro's of the tools that are going to absolutely be necessary.
    Screwdriver - I got this covered. (I.G.T.C)
    Hammer - I need something smaller, more proportionate to the scale of toys.
    Wrench - IGTC
    Pliers - IGTC
    X-Acto Knife - IGTC
    Now those are pretty basic, pretty household object. What I need most are the specialties. A pin pusher, some kind of sculpting putty (and something that I can use for mockups, to see if something will work or fit the way I want to.). Paint. I need a dremel...
    Can the experienced ones give me the brand names that you use? Maybe tell me what the price range will be? I just want to be prepared for when I really get into this. Thanks ahead of time.
     
  2. QmTablit

    QmTablit Disguise: Check. Robot...

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    Dremel brand Dremel and bit set.

    Pin punch set.

    Several small screwdrivers, including one marketed for eyeglasses.

    I personally keep a piece of Christmas tree stump which I use to hammer my pins onto. Any block of wood could do. Better than sticking pins into your work desk. That and hammering on the floor doesn't shake up your entire work desk.

    You don't really need a smaller hammer. I use a 10 or 12 ounce one, and just let the hammer's weight and gravity do the work. Better than having force transfer to the plastic piece. You could also just use a rubber mallet.

    Other than that, some basic paint tools are of course brushes and trays.

    I also keep a couple jars from spaghetti sauce or pickles for when I soak parts in alcohol.
     
  3. hthrun

    hthrun Show accuracy's overrated

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    Here's a post in the tutorial section that lists a bunch of tools.

    The tool that I have found most useful is flush cutters. You can get them in the sewing section at Walmart. They make cutting plastic really easy, safe, and clean compared to my dremel. The only thing is it's not very precise on the non-flat side. If you're going to remove a lot of plastic from your cut, I highly recommend them.
     
  4. wildfly

    wildfly Lasers, 8 O'Clock, Day 1.

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    Automatic center punch?
     
  5. UnicronFTW

    UnicronFTW Don't blink.

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    Thank you so much for that, pretty much exactly what I was looking for.
     
  6. hthrun

    hthrun Show accuracy's overrated

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    Glad to help! Another thing I've found extremely useful for tightening joints and other things is clear finger nail polish. Just put in a drop and move the joint every so often...
     
  7. UnicronFTW

    UnicronFTW Don't blink.

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    I'm more then familiar with the finger nail polish trick. Love that stuff.
     

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