Customs: Milling Machines

Discussion in 'Creative General Discussion' started by Lobo, Dec 11, 2007.

  1. Lobo

    Lobo Well-Known Member

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  2. frenzyrumble

    frenzyrumble Banned

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    those aren't exactly necessary. There's a small vice you can attach to a table, then plug your drill/dremel into the top of it, you then are able to drill any specific degree angle into your material.
     
  3. Sculpt-bot

    Sculpt-bot So waddya want, a medal?

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    Hey Lobo!
    I had asked Griffith76 about how he had pulled off his HOS Optimus, and his WWI Optimus. This was his response in regards to the rapid prototyping.

    "Hi SB,

    I had difficulty in learning CAD programs after getting familiar with Maya. The machine I'm using is the Roland MSX-40(S11,000). Its functions are pretty limited and it'll take quite a bit more work to get things done the way you want it to, but it's affordable compared to other machines like 3D printers which gives very low resolution at a high price. If you only need to do smaller parts you can consider the MDX-15($3,000). And if you have money to spare then go for the MDX-540 which can mill out larger parts and save you quite a bit of time with its automatic tool changer ($20,000 or 30,000 with tool changer)

    3D printers cost from a minimum of $50,000 for a low end model if I didnt remember wrongly and the cartridges cost a bomb.

    Most RP machines nowadays do not require programming. You just export the stl or obj files into the software that comes along with the machine and it'll do the job on its own. But do take note that there are many considerations when you wanna purchase a RP machine. Every type of machine has its pros n cons and liitations. Ultimately its about cost, speed, maintenance, and how your designs are done to work around their limitations."
    These are the machines that I have been looking at, because it gives you the option of refining the part you are making (through CAD programs) and mass producing it. However for the purposes of doing a one off part, the machines you have posted look like they would work great. They do take some practice. The Dremel attachment that frenzy rumble was talking about works fine for smaller parts, but I find it has limitations when trying to do a bigger job.
    Hope this helps!
    -SB
     
  4. Lobo

    Lobo Well-Known Member

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    Is this what you're talking about?

    http://www.dremel.com/en-us/attachments-and-accessories/attachment-accessory-detail.htm?H=188575&G=69679&I=80470

    I'm a little shaky when it comes to using the Dremel by hand. Sanding, cutting, stuff like that I'm ok with. What I'm looking to do is precise detailing work. Something I can sketch on a piece of styrene and engrave the design.

    I have a Dremel drill press that I use quite a bit and I thought it would work but I would still need a XY table for it.

    That would be nice but a CAD machine setup like that is WAY beyond my means. :lol 
     
  5. frenzyrumble

    frenzyrumble Banned

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    ahh, looking at the photos...they look much like simple drill presses.

    I would check with your local sign shop. I worked in one once, which had a 15'x10' routing table. This system is similar to what Sculpt-Bot was mentioning.

    Basically, it's a CAD system that cuts your vector based artwork with a blade, into any substrate you choose. Some sign shops will cut a small set of files for pretty cheap, and it's as precise as you are gonna get.

    Basically, you need to create all your files in a vector format (outlines) the machine reads and the router cuts along those lines. In the past, we've cut steel, wood, plastic, even glass. We've cut letters or shapes from 1/8" inch in size all the way to 10 foot tall. Can cut 1/32 thick...all the way to 4-5 inches. They are very awesome machines.
     
  6. Boggs6ft7

    Boggs6ft7 TFW2005 Supporter

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    You might looking into renting a machine, it seems you could get them pretty cheap for a month or two, that way you at least got a chance to try it out without dumping a few grand.
     

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