Joint nomenclature and definitions

Discussion in 'Transformers Toy Discussion' started by ComicGuy89, Oct 23, 2009.

  1. ComicGuy89

    ComicGuy89 Well-Known Member

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    Hi guys, I haven't found a comprehensive guide anywhere for joints, just bits and pieces at various sites.

    So, I'd like to ask if you guys could list down the various types of joints in Transformers figures and give definitions and examples? So far, I know that there are:

    1) ball-joints =
    "a ball rotates in a socket, held in position by friction, and when used in a Transformer toy's limb or other flexible area it can allow a great range of motion, as long as parts don't get in the way, because it can both hinge on any axis and rotate." -tfwiki

    2) pin joints/single-axis hinges =
    "...they usually have a metal pin that connects the two parts" - mx-01 archon

    3) swivel joints =
    "...is a joint which couples two components together while allowing them rotary motion relative to each other." - tfwiki.
    "...are the type generally used for neck, bicep, thigh, wrist, etc. articulation. Also called rotational joints." - mx-01 archon. (Question: Are these the same as pin joints?)

    4) pegs =
    "...are a subset of swivel joints, relying on a peg (usually slightly mushroom-shaped, the parts from disconnecting too easily) and hole to provide rotational movement, but also allows the two parts to be disconnected to prevent breakage under high force." - mx-01 archon

    5) Ratchet =
    "...is one in which relative rotary motion is restricted or prevented in one or both directions by a member with one or more teeth (the "pawl") which presses against a toothed wheel (the "ratchet")" - tfwiki
    "The clicky type are "ratchet joints". A subclass of these is sometimes denoted as "soft ratchets". Those are they type that rely on irregularly shaped joints to perform a similar function to mechanical spring-type ratchets (sometimes the spring is substituted by a plastic tab), usually using squared-off joints and friction (as evident on the elbows, knees, feet, and tailfins of the Classics Starscream mold)." - mx-01 archon

    This list will be continually updated.

    The question marks indicate that I do not know what these joints are like. Do you know what those clicky joints in Revoltech and Leader Class figures are called? (Those that go click-click-click as you turn them)

    Finally, I'd like to know if MP Grimlock has those click-click-click joints? Thanks a lot guys!
     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2009
  2. DeathStorm

    DeathStorm Snoochie Boochies

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  3. thenatureboywoo

    thenatureboywoo Veteran

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    I'm not so smart, so I'm sorry if I am wrong, but aren't the click, click joints called ratchet joints.
     
  4. mx-01 archon

    mx-01 archon Well-Known Member

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    The clicky type are "ratchet joints". A subclass of these is sometimes denoted as "soft ratchets". Those are they type that rely on irregularly shaped joints to perform a similar function to mechanical spring-type ratchets (sometimes the spring is substituted by a plastic tab), usually using squared-off joints and friction (as evident on the elbows, knees, feet, and tailfins of the Classics Starscream mold).

    Pin joints are single-axis hinges, so called because they usually have a metal pin that connects the two parts.

    Swivel joints are the type generally used for neck, bicep, thigh, wrist, etc. articulation. Also called rotational joints.

    More complex forms of jointing are Universal Joints. They provide generally the same range of movement as ball joints, but are made of a combination of swivels and hinges. Larger figures usually use this set up in hips and shoulders, as opposed to the weaker ball joint connections.

    Peg joints are a subset of swivel joints, relying on a peg (usually slightly mushroom-shaped, the parts from disconnecting too easily) and hole to provide rotational movement, but also allows the two parts to be disconnected to prevent breakage under high force.
     
  5. ComicGuy89

    ComicGuy89 Well-Known Member

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    Thanks a whole lot, mx-01 archon! I have edited and updated the definitions. If you guys have anymore, please do come forward and help, I would really like to know all about the joints.

    So, does MP Grimlock have ratchet "clicky" joints? I always thought that these joints were stronger than simple single-axis-hinge joints.
     
  6. Sage o' G-fruit

    Sage o' G-fruit Critics gonna critique

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    This is a really good idea. Looking forward to seeing this list evolve. :thumb 
     
  7. ComicGuy89

    ComicGuy89 Well-Known Member

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    Thanks, but we'll need more posts to keep it going. Does anyone have MP Grimlock here? I really want to know whether he has ratchet (click-click) joints and how many of them he has.
     
  8. Bumblethumper

    Bumblethumper old misery guts

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    There's also other various other types of combination joints.

    A lot of figures have double-pinned elbow joints(Deluxe Skids + Mudflap for example).

    One of the more interesting/unusual combination joints I've come across is one I first noticed on Protoform Optimus. It's the hip-leg connection. It has the appearance of being a ball joint inside a ball joint. In reality it's a combination ball-joint and a swivel-joint. It's quite nifty. I suppose you might call it a ball & swivel joint.

    There would also be the various geared-joints and spring-loaded joints you get in figures with automorph and mech-alive features.

    One type of joint I haven't seen on a transformer would be elasticated string joints. They'd add a lot of flexibility and potential, but I'm not sure how well they'd age.
     
  9. Gingerchris

    Gingerchris Telly-headed Tyrant

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    If memory serves the Laser Rods like Electro had elasticated joints in places. As did the Actionmasters. Both for legs, I think. Might just be my old man brain playing tricks on me though.
     

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