Is there a book that teaches rudimentary math skills?

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Predaking, Dec 17, 2006.

  1. Predaking

    Predaking Well-Known Member

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    I am the type of person who despises numbers and math, and thus I lack some basic skills to calculate math on the fly. I mean I got calculators and all that but whenever I encounter a math problem on the job or everyday life my mind just go completely blank. Is there a book out there that helps people like me with fear of numbers to understand math? I'd love to be able to face those number problems head on and not have to stumble every time I face them. Thanks.

    And just FYI it's not I don't know how to solve them but want a kind of shorcut or basic steps I can take to get to the solution faster and without use of calculator.
     
  2. BigPrime3000

    BigPrime3000 Well-Known Member

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    How rudimentary are you talking about?

    I recently started playing darts quite often, and have found that my basic addition/subtraction/multiplication/division skills have increased from keeping score in dart games. A book might help, but doing something that forces you to use them will help you remember better and be faster with your math.
     
  3. fschuler

    fschuler Member TFW2005 Supporter

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    ^^ Yeah, practice will definitely speed you up.
     
  4. Predaking

    Predaking Well-Known Member

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    The kind of problems that give me trouble are usually involve percentage, fractions, ratio, and divisions.
     
  5. mblase

    mblase Well-Known Member

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    There's "Mathemagics" ( http://www.amazon.com/Mathemagics-Genius-Without-Really-Trying/dp/0737300086 ) and the dozens of variations on it available at amazon.com -- your local B&N or Borders should have a couple books like this in the Mathematics section. They're all guides to doing arithmetic in your head without necessarily using the techniques you learned in elementary school for doing them on paper.

    (Sorry, but I can't recommend or dis-recommend any of these from personal experience.)
     
  6. Boggs6ft7

    Boggs6ft7 TFW2005 Supporter

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    Unless you are doing math all the time, I really don't know of anything that can help you.

    Kinda like weight lifting, I can train myself and build up to a 350 lb bench press, but if I stop lifting, I wouldn't be able to do that ame weight 6 months later.

    I use math every day (physics teacher) so I stay pretty sharp in that department.
     
  7. Predaking

    Predaking Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the link. I may get those books to help me overcome my math problems.
     
  8. llamatron

    llamatron Shut up, Nigel. TFW2005 Supporter

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    The best way is just to keep doing lots of maths - the more you do the better you'll get. Force yourself to do some problems each day and soon you'll be able to just bust the fractions etc out like it's nobodies business.
     

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